Busy. Please wait.
or

show password
Forgot Password?

Don't have an account?  Sign up 
or

Username is available taken
show password

why


Make sure to remember your password. If you forget it there is no way for StudyStack to send you a reset link. You would need to create a new account.
We do not share your email address with others. It is only used to allow you to reset your password. For details read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.


Already a StudyStack user? Log In

Reset Password
Enter the associated with your account, and we'll email you a link to reset your password.
Don't know
Know
remaining cards
Save
0:01
To flip the current card, click it or press the Spacebar key.  To move the current card to one of the three colored boxes, click on the box.  You may also press the UP ARROW key to move the card to the "Know" box, the DOWN ARROW key to move the card to the "Don't know" box, or the RIGHT ARROW key to move the card to the Remaining box.  You may also click on the card displayed in any of the three boxes to bring that card back to the center.

Pass complete!

"Know" box contains:
Time elapsed:
Retries:
restart all cards
share
Embed Code - If you would like this activity on your web page, copy the script below and paste it into your web page.

  Normal Size     Small Size show me how

Loss, Death, Grief

Test #7

QuestionAnswer
Maturational losses are a form of necessary loss and include all normally expected life changes across the life span.
Situational loss sudden unpredictable external events
actual loss occurs when a person can no longer feel, hear or know a person or object
perceived losses are uniquely defined by the person experiencing the loss are less obvious to people
grief is the emotional response to a loss, manifested in ways unique to an individual, base on personal experiences, cultural expectations, and spiritual beliefs.
mourning the outward, social expressions of grief and the behavior associated with loss
bereavement captures both grief and mourning and includes the emotional responses and outward behaviors of a person experiencing loss.
normal or uncomplicated grief is most common reaction to death
complicated grief the grieving person has a prolonged or significantly difficult time moving forward after a loss
anticipatory grief the unconscious process of disengaging or "letting go" before the actual loss or death occurs, especially in situation of prolonged or predicted loss
denial a person acts as though nothing has happened and refuses to accept the fact of the loss
bargaining cushions and postpones awareness of the loss by trying to prevent it from happening
depression individuals feel overwhelmingly sad, hopeless, and lonely.
acceptance the person incorporates the loss into life and finds ways to move forward.
numbing the shortest phase of mourning, may last from a few hours to a week or more.
disorganization and despair a person endlessly examines how and why the loss occurred or expresses anger at anyone who seems responsible for the loss.
reorganization which usually takes a year or more, begins to accept change, assume unfamiliar roles, acquire new skills and build new relationships.
yearning and searching emotional outbursts of tearful sobbing and acute distress characterize the second bereavement phase.
hope multidimensional component of spirituality, energizes and provides comfort to individuals experiencing personal challenges.
denial a person acts as though nothing has happened and refuses to accept the fact of the loss
bargaining cushions and postpones awareness of the loss by trying to prevent it from happening
depression individuals feel overwhelmingly sad, hopeless, and lonely.
acceptance the person incorporates the loss into life and finds ways to move forward.
numbing the shortest phase of mourning, may last from a few hours to a week or more.
disorganization and despair a person endlessly examines how and why the loss occurred or expresses anger at anyone who seems responsible for the loss.
reorganization which usually takes a year or more, begins to accept change, assume unfamiliar roles, acquire new skills and build new relationships.
yearning and searching emotional outbursts of tearful sobbing and acute distress characterize the second bereavement phase.
hope multidimensional component of spirituality, energizes and provides comfort to individuals experiencing personal challenges.
denial a person acts as though nothing has happened and refuses to accept the fact of the loss
bargaining cushions and postpones awareness of the loss by trying to prevent it from happening
depression individuals feel overwhelmingly sad, hopeless, and lonely.
acceptance the person incorporates the loss into life and finds ways to move forward.
numbing the shortest phase of mourning, may last from a few hours to a week or more.
disorganization and despair a person endlessly examines how and why the loss occurred or expresses anger at anyone who seems responsible for the loss.
reorganization which usually takes a year or more, begins to accept change, assume unfamiliar roles, acquire new skills and build new relationships.
yearning and searching emotional outbursts of tearful sobbing and acute distress characterize the second bereavement phase.
hope multidimensional component of spirituality, energizes and provides comfort to individuals experiencing personal challenges.
spiritual integration occurs when an individual comes to terms with his or her life and puts life's pieces together in a way consistent with one's entire life.
palliative care is the prevention, relief, reduction or soothing of symptoms of disease or disorders throughout the entire course of an illness
hospice care is a philosophy and a model for the care of terminally ill clients and their families.
organ and tissue donation a specially trained professional will talk to a family about organ donation
postmortem care the care of the body after death. Above all, a human body deserves the same respect and dignity as a living person, and needs to be prepared consistent with client's cultural and religious beliefs.
Kubler-Ross Stages of Dying denial a person acts as though nothing has happened and refuses to accept the fact of the loss. The person shows no understanding of what has occured
Kubler-Ross Stages of Dying Anger a person expresses resistance ans sometimes feels intense anger at God, other people, or a situation
Kubler-Ross Stages of Dying bargaining cushions and postpones awareness of the loss by trying to prevent it from happening. Grieving or dying people make promises to to prevent self, God, or loved ones that they will lived differently if they can be spared the dreaded outcome.
Kubler-Ross Stages of Dying Depression when person realizes full impact of the loss
Kubler-Ross Stages of Dying Acceptance the perswon incorporates the loss into life and find ways to move forward.
Bowelby's attachment theory Numbing the shortest phase of mourning, may last from a few hours to a week or more. The grieving person describes this phase as feeling "stunned"
Bowelby's Attachment theory Yearning and searching Emotional outbursts of tearful sobbing and acute distress.
Bowelby's Attachment Theory disorganization and despair a person endlessly examines how and why the loss occurred or expresses anger at anyone who seems responsible for the loss.
Bowelby's attachment theory reorganization which usually takes a year or more, the person begins to accept change, assume unfamiliar roles, acquire new skills, and build new relationships.
Worden's tasks of mourning Task 1 Accept the reality of the loss. It means accepting the person or object is gone and will not return.
Worden's tasks of mourning Task 2 Work through the pain of grief. People react with sadness, loneliness, despair or regret and will work through painful feelings.
Worden's tasks of mourning Task 3 Adjust to the environment in which the deceases is missing.
Worden's tasks of mourning Task 4 Emotionally relocate the deceased and move on with life.
Factors influencing loss and grief Human Development Client age and stage of development affect the grief response.
Factors influencing loss and grief personal relationships loss involves another person, the quality and meaning of lost relationship influences the grief response.
Factors influencing loss and grief nature of the loss exploring the meaning of loss has for a client helps the nurse better understand the impact of the loss on the client's behavior, health and well-being
factors influencing loss and grief coping strategies life experiences shape the coping strategies a person uses to deal with the stress of loss. emotional disclosure has been viewed as an important way to cope with loss.
factors influencing loss and grief socioeconomic status socioeconomic status influences a person's ability to access support and resources for coping with loss and physical responses to stress.
factors influencing loss and grief culture and ethnicity a person's culture and other social structures influence the interpretations of loss, establish acceptable expressions of grief, and provide stability and structure i the midst of chaos and loss.
factors influencing loss and grief spiritual and religious beliefs the care of seriously ill clients usually involves medical interventions to restore or maintain health.
factors influencing loss and grief hope a multidimensional component of spirituality energizes and provides comfort to individuals experiencing personal challenges/ gives a person the ability to see life as enduring or having purpose.
Hope for terminally ill focus on milestones, significant events, or relief of pain or other symptoms.
End of Life Decisions most deaths are negotiated so everyone know the end-of-life decisions: withdrawal of life support, DNR, palliative or aggressive care.
Nurses experience with grief being professional is knowing when to get away from the situation to care for yourself.
Promoting hope hope; an energizing resource for patient affective dimension;show empathy cognitive dimension; offer information behavioral dimension; assisting patient to return to healthy behaviors
facilitating mourning help survivor accept loss, support efforts to adjust, encourage new relationships, allow time to grieve, interpret normal behavior, provide continuing support, and be alert for signs of ineffective, potentially harmful coping mechanisms.
palliative care to prevent, relieve, reduce, or soothe symptoms without cure
hospice care an alternative with less than 6 months to live, family focused
care after death patient gets treated with dignity and respect. each facility is required to develop policies for postmortem care. specially trained professional talk to family about organ donation. Respect cultural and religious customs
Created by: azchic1973