Busy. Please wait.
or

show password
Forgot Password?

Don't have an account?  Sign up 
or

Username is available taken
show password

why

Make sure to remember your password. If you forget it there is no way for StudyStack to send you a reset link. You would need to create a new account.

By signing up, I agree to StudyStack's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.


Already a StudyStack user? Log In

Reset Password
Enter the associated with your account, and we'll email you a link to reset your password.

Remove ads
Don't know
Know
remaining cards
Save
0:01
To flip the current card, click it or press the Spacebar key.  To move the current card to one of the three colored boxes, click on the box.  You may also press the UP ARROW key to move the card to the "Know" box, the DOWN ARROW key to move the card to the "Don't know" box, or the RIGHT ARROW key to move the card to the Remaining box.  You may also click on the card displayed in any of the three boxes to bring that card back to the center.

Pass complete!

"Know" box contains:
Time elapsed:
Retries:
restart all cards




share
Embed Code - If you would like this activity on your web page, copy the script below and paste it into your web page.

  Normal Size     Small Size show me how

DU PA LRI

Duke PA Lower Respiratory Tract Infections

QuestionAnswer
lower respiratory tract starts below what anatomic structure vocal chords
diagnosed by new infiltrate on exam or x-ray pneumonia
#1 cause of death from infectious diseas in the US is from pneumonia
hospital aquired pneumonia is defined as symptom onset >___ hours after hospital admission 48
most common bacterium associated with pneumonia world wide Streptococcus pneumoniae
pneumococcus colonizes ____% of healthy adults 5-10
May have associated non-respiratory syndromes (CNS, immune hemolytic anemia) Mycoplasma pneumoniae
the original atypical pneumonia organism, although it is present in up to 1/3 of cases Mycoplasma pneumoniae
‘Discovered’ in 1976 during an outbreak of pneumonia. Found in aquatic environments Legionella pneumophilia
50% of 20 year olds have serologic evidence of past infection. Organism is associated with chronic inflammatory diseases (atherosclerosis) Chlamydia pneumonia
may cause necrotizing infiltrates or pneumatoceles Staphylococcal pneumonia
may cause necrotizing infiltrates or pneumatoceles gram negative
Inhalation of oropharyngeal or gastric contents (volume-dependent) aspiration pneumonia
may cause necrotizing infiltrates or pneumatoceles aspiration pneumonia
what is a factor that increases risk of infection with a drug resistant-pneumococci recent beta lactam therapy (withing the past 3 months)
what is a factor that increases risk of infection with a drug resistant-pneumococci >65 years of age
factor that increases the risk for gram negative infection residence in a nursing home
factor that increases the risk for enteric gram negative infection underlying cardiopulmonary disease
factor that increases the risk for infection with pseudomonas aeruginosa Corticosteroid therapy (> 10 mg/d of prednisone)
factor that increases the risk for infection with pseudomonas aeruginosa Structural lung disease (bronchiectasis)
factor that increases the risk for infection with pseudomonas aeruginosa Broad-spectrum antibiotics (> 7 d in past month)
Advanced generation macrolide azithromycin or clarithromycin
Respiratory quinolone Moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, or gemifloxacin
Outpatient therapy for pneumonia in otherwise healthy patients Advanced generation macrolide
Outpatient therapy for pneumonia in otherwise healthy patients azithromycin or clarithromycin
Outpatient therapy for pneumonia in otherwise healthy patients if patient is allergic to macrolides doxycycline
Outpatient therapy for pneumonia in patients with cardiopulmonary disease and/or other modifying factors Anti-pneumococcal fluoroquinolone
Outpatient therapy for pneumonia in patients with cardiopulmonary disease and/or other modifying factors macrolide PLUS b-Lactam (oral cefpodoxime, cefuroxime, high-dose amoxicillin, amox/clavulanate; or parenteral ceftriaxone followed by oral cefpodoxime
rates of influenza has _____ compared to previous decade, possibly due to aging population and/or change in predominating viral strains (H3N2) doubled
influenza has an incubation period of ___ days 1-4
Fever, myalgia, headache, malaise, nonproductive cough, sore throat, rhinitis are all symptoms of influenza
Resolution in ___ days, though cough and malaise can persist for over 2 weeks 3-7
Children with influenza may present with otitis media, nausea, vomiting
Viral cultures are optimal from ______ specimens and require specific viral culture media nasopharyngeal
Only _______ effective against both Influenza A and B ostelmavir and zanamivir
Who needs annual influenza vaccinations Long term aspirin therapy
Who needs annual influenza vaccinations pregnancy
Who needs annual influenza vaccinations Chronic medical conditions (pulmonary, cardiac, metabolic, renal, neurologic, immunodeficiency, hemoglobinopathy)
Who needs annual influenza vaccinations nursing home residents
Who needs annual influenza vaccinations Age 6 months-18 years or >50 yr
Radiographic findings include infiltrates in mid or lower lung fields, hilar adenopathy, cavitation tuberculosis
Cough, weight loss, fever, night sweats, hemoptysis, fatigue, decreased appetite, chest pain can be the clinical presentation of _____ reactivated tuberculosis
CXR with upper lobe infiltrates, particularly the apical and posterior segments, cavitation common reactivated tuberculosis
Created by: bwyche