Busy. Please wait.
or

show password
Forgot Password?

Don't have an account?  Sign up 
or

Username is available taken
show password

why

Make sure to remember your password. If you forget it there is no way for StudyStack to send you a reset link. You would need to create a new account.

By signing up, I agree to StudyStack's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.


Already a StudyStack user? Log In

Reset Password
Enter the associated with your account, and we'll email you a link to reset your password.

Remove ads
Don't know
Know
remaining cards
Save
0:01
To flip the current card, click it or press the Spacebar key.  To move the current card to one of the three colored boxes, click on the box.  You may also press the UP ARROW key to move the card to the "Know" box, the DOWN ARROW key to move the card to the "Don't know" box, or the RIGHT ARROW key to move the card to the Remaining box.  You may also click on the card displayed in any of the three boxes to bring that card back to the center.

Pass complete!

"Know" box contains:
Time elapsed:
Retries:
restart all cards




share
Embed Code - If you would like this activity on your web page, copy the script below and paste it into your web page.

  Normal Size     Small Size show me how

ADHI Ch7

Capitalization

QuestionAnswer
give distinction, importance, or emphasis to words fundamental role of capitalization
most words are capitalized to emphasize their identities as entities of significance
require capitalization to set them off from text around them, often to indicate introduction of new thought/concept first/opening words
capitalize __ __ of every sentence first word
capitalize __ question w/in sentence independent
capitalize first word of quoted sentence when quoted material represents independent clause or complete sentence
do not capitalize first word of quoted material when it represents phrase/subordinate clause
do not capitalize first word after __ if material that follows is subordinate & cannot stand alone as sentence colon
capitalize first word after colon if it is __ __ or other word that is automatically capitalized proper noun
capitalize first word of independent clause after colon to express special emphasis or formal rule/instruction
capitalize first word after colon when material following colon consists of 2/more sentences
capitalize first word after colon when material preceding colon is short introductory word, such as Note, Caution, Wanted
capitalize each item in __ or __, even when items in list represent single words, phrases, or clauses list; outline
when sentence/independent clause set off by dashes/parentheses w/in another sentence, do not capitalize first word following opening dash/parentheses
do not capitalize first word, when into within parentheses/dashes represents word, phrase, or subordinate clause
capitalize __ __ in titles & designations major words
when preceding personal names all personal, executive, professional, civic, military, & religious titles should be capitalized
when preceding personal names, but follows appositive set off by commas, all personal, executive, professional, civic, military, & religious titles should not be capitalized
do not capitalize general __ __ when they precede personal names occupational titles
occupational titles __ be used with a personal name when it stands alone cannot
official titles __ be used with a personal name when it stands alone can
do not capitalize __ titles when they follow personal name or are used in its place official
retain capitalization for all __ national officials, state officials, foreign dignitaries, & international figures high-ranking
capitalize all official titles when in __ __ direct address
capitalize all family titles (mother, sister, father, etc.) when they are followed by a personal name & when they stand alone
do not capitalize family titles when they are preceded by __ __ possessive pronoun
do not capitalize family titles when they are __ by an article, such as the preceded
capitalize all literary & artistic titles except articles, short conjunctions, & short prepositions unless they occur as 1st/last word of title
do not capitalize word the when it __ a title unless it is part of __ precedes; title
titles of articles take __ __ only when they are used in a reference/source citation initial capitals
treat unique documents & forms within medical facility as you would an article, meaning generic references would not be capitalized
when specific form/document could be confused for common noun/phrase, best to __ __ __ for name of form being referenced use initial capitals
document/form uniquely created & named by facility should be capitalized when it is referenced within document
capitalize abbreviated forms for __ __, especially when they follow personal name professional credentials
do not capitalized credentials that are __ __ when they are generally referenced in sentence, unless they __ personal name as a formal title spelled out; follow
do not capitalize academic degrees used in general description or classification
do capitalize academic degrees that follow personal name as formal title
only capitalize the word __ when referring to its levels, only when a number follows it but not when number precedes it grade
do capitalize general references to __ __ unless full formal name of law/document is referenced legal terms
capitalize all __ nouns or __ names of person, place, or thing proper; official
do not capitalize proper nouns or official name when they function as common nouns
capitalize __ prefix in names that contain it as well as letter that follows apostrophe O'
when common noun used in place of full name, do not capitalize __ __ unless special emphasis is required or when common noun is personified short form
capitalize abbreviated forms of company, corporation, incorporated, & limited when business name incorporates those abbreviations in its formal name/title
eponyms or words named after a person __ __ capitalized should be
extremely common in medical language, where name diseases, signs, syndromes, tests, procedures, instruments, & surgical equipment names are named after inventor, creator, discoverer eponyms
do not __ adjectival or verbal forms derived from eponyms capitalize
capitalize adjectival forms of words derived from proper nouns that are __ __, most of which represent geographic designations not eponyms
when expressed as general reference common organizational terms (department, division, committee, etc.) should not be capitalized
organizational terms unique to clinic/acute care setting (clinic, laboratory, emergency room, intensive care unit, etc) do not get capitalized
clinic, laboratory, emergency room, intensive care unit, etc should be treated as __ nouns common
common organizational terms should be capitalized when they are part of formal name, including part of federal government agency name
anesthesia, pathology, surgery, etc. should be capitalized when functioning in sentence as organizational entity
anesthesia, pathology, surgery, etc. should not be capitalized when it is their primary/common meaning being referred to in sentence
when functioning as organizational entity (anesthesia, pathology, surgery, etc.) will be able to identify them by personification or departmental entity
when identifying words, such as anesthesia, pathology, surgery, etc., can be helpful to substitute word definition/full departmental entity in place of word to see which makes sense in context
anesthesia, pathology, surgery, etc. look for the word __ which would required no capitalization; specimen sent for pathology for
anesthesia, pathology, surgery, etc. look for the word __ which would required capitalization; specimen sent to Pathology to
brand names, trade names, & trademark names will require capitalization
in order to confirm brand status (brand names, trade names, & trademark names) you should always refer to reputable pharmacology reference or resource
many pharmacological brand names use __, or mixed, capitalization in their names idiosyncratic
those that use idiosyncratic capitalization should be transcribed that way; capitalized portions of terms many time represent acronyms that identify specific protocols chemotherapy protocols & investigational agents
generic name, aka nonproprietary name, is __, __ name for a drug established; official
in US, generic name of drugs are created by US Adopted Names (USAN) Council
internationally, generic name of drugs are created by World Health Organization (WHO)
generic drug names are public domain, use is unrestricted & __ __ __ capitalization do not require
when generic & brand names of medication sound a like, use __ __ generic name
when generic & brand names of medication sound a like, use brand name only if specifically being referenced
always refer to reputable pharmacology reference or resource to confirm generic status
illegal/illicit drugs names, or their street references, should __ __ capitalized not be
do not capitalize medicinal __ __ used in alternative medicine herb names
do capitalize proper nouns __ __ medicinal herb names used in alternative medicine; i.e. St. John's wort, St. James weed that accompany
be careful not to confuse medicinal herb names w/their genus/species names; genus __ __ capitalized would be
be careful not to confuse medicinal herb names w/their genus/species names; species __ __ not capitalized
always capitalize genus name & their __ __ when they are accompanied by species name; i.e. Staphylococcus aureus, S aureus abbreviated forms
do not capitalize __ names used in plural & adjectival forms; i.e. staphylococci; strep throat/staph infection genus
do not capitalize genus names when used in __; i.e. staphylococcal infection vernacular
do not capitalize genus names when they __ __ (without a species name); i.e. staphylococcus stand alone
suffixes -osis & -iasis indicate disease caused by particular class of infectious agents/types of infections, & __ require capitalization don't
countries, cities, towns, counties, continents, islands, streets, buildings, parks, airports, peninsulas, bodies of water, monuments, forests, canyons, dams, mountains, & regions will require capitalization when they name specific location by proper name
countries, cities, towns, counties, continents, islands, streets, buildings, parks, airports, peninsulas, bodies of water, monuments, forests, canyons, dams, mountains, & regions will not require capitalization when described by common nouns in general reference
common geographical name is not capitalized in compound expressions
some common geographic names, i.e. the Hill (Capital Hill), the Village (Greenwich Village), etc., are capitalized purely because of their __ __ w/particular place but only when completely unambiguous in context clear association
city is capitalized only when it is part of name of city or is nickname of that city
names of races, languages, nationalities, ethnicities, tribes, political parties, religions, & religious denominations are always capitalized
when referring to race you would not capitalize a(n) designation of white/black; i.e. single white female
references to general religious observances, i.e. baptism, seder, etc., would not be capitalized unless they are formed from proper nouns
special & historical events, i.e. Civil War, should be capitalized, but not common nouns that accompany them; i.e. era
names of awards, medals, & honors __ __ capitalization always require
formal titles of acts, laws, bills, & treaties require capitalization but not common nouns used in place of them
to determine designated capitalization of programming languages & operating systems always refer to reputable source when they are written in all capitals
there are reputable resources for software applications that are expressed as compound nouns requiring capital letter at beginning of each statement
when dealing w/computer commands, functions, or features use initial capitals
capitalize north, south, east, west, & words derived from these terms when they identify specific region or are part of proper names
do not capitalize north, south, east, west, & words derived from these terms when they are expressed as general direction/location
days of week, months, holidays, & religious days __ __ capitalization will demand
names of seasons are not capitalized unless they are personified
names of programs, movements, or concepts (social security check, civil rights activist, etc.) are not capitalized when used in general reference
names of programs, movements, or concepts (Social Security Administration, civil Rights Act, etc.) are capitalized when used as part of proper names
when heading is referred to in body of report, use initial capitals for __ __ in heading to clearly delineate reference as proper heading & not common noun/phrase each word
when heading is referred to in body of report, use initial capitals for each word in heading except for articles & prepositions
when a heading is formatted in all capitals, reference to heading elsewhere in report should not be expressed in all capitals
when clear in context that physician is not referencing specific section of report, but is using phrase as general reference do not capitalize or delineate as formal title
do not capitalize words from which __ or __ is derived unless words are official name, title, or proper nouns acronyms; initialism
when case studies, protocols, or clinical trials are given acronyms that do not always represent initialism, do not use unusual capitalization to indicate how study name was derived
nouns functioning in __ role in sentence should be capitalized, in order to differentiate it from its common noun usage personified
nouns are said to be personified when they are assigned human qualities
refers to concept of giving inanimate object, human/animated qualities personification
capitalize only those elements of __ __ that are proper nouns or proper adjectives when they occur within a sentence hyphenated words
capitalize only the __ __ of hyphenated word when it occurs at beginning of sentence first element
when hyphenated compounds occur in headings, titles, subtitles, or tables, do not capitalize __ __ of hyphenated compound if either part is hyphenated prefix/suffix, or if commonly read as unit second part
when hyphenated compounds represent words that are commonly read as unit & carry equal weight in compound, both parts should be capitalized when used in headings, titles, etc.
Created by: lfrancois