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Surgical Sutures

Sutures & Needles

QuestionAnswer
Plain Gut, absorbable or non absorbable? absorbable
Plain Gut, what color is the packaging? yellow
Plain Gut, what color is the suture strand? yellow or tan
Plain Gut, monofilament or multifilament? monofilament
Plain Gut, what is it stored in? alcohol
Plain Gut, tensile strength? decreased in 7-10 days, 0% in 2-3 weeks
Plain Gut, absorption rate? enzymatic digestion complete within 70 days (faster in presence of infection)
Plain Gut, common usage? superficial hemostasis, tissue with rapid healing time, ligate small vessels
Plain Gut, what is it made of? submucosa of sheep intestine or serosa of beef intestine
Chromic Gut, absorbable or nonabsorbable? absorbable
Chromic Gut, monofilament or multifilament? monofilament
Chromic Gut, what color is the packaging? beige or tan
Chromic Gut, what color is the suture strand? brown
Chromic Gut, absorption rate? enzymatic digestion complete within 90 days (faster in the presence of infection)
Chromic Gut, what is it made of? collagen, submucosa of sheep intestine or serosa of beef intestine
Chromic Gut, what is it treated with and why? treated with chromic salts to delay rate of absorption
Chromic Gut, tensile strength? significant decrease in 21 days
Chromic Gut, common usage? internal ligation, may be used on peritoneum and fascia and infected or contaminated areas, biliary or urinary tract
Maxon, absorbable or nonabsorbable? absorbable
Maxon, monofilament or multifilament? monofilament
Maxon, color of the packaging? silver
Maxon, color of the suture strand? green, blue
Maxon, is made up of what? synthetic fiber
Maxon, absorption rate? minimal for approximately 60 days and complete within 6 months
Maxon, tensile strength? 70% remains at 2 weeks and 55% remains at 3 weeks. Tissue reaction is minimal
Maxon, common usage? general soft tissue approximation, pediatric cardiovascular tissue, and peripheral vascular tissue
PDSII, absorbable or nonabsorbable? absorbable
PDSII, monofilatment or multifilament? monofilament
PDSII, color of packaging? silver
PDSII, color of suture strand? dyed: violet undyed: clear
PDSII, what is it made of? synthetic fiber from petroleum by products
PDSII, absorption rate? hydrolyzed in 180-240 days
PDSII, tensile strength? 50% retained at 4 weeks, 25% retained at 6 weeks. minimal tissue reaction
PDSII, common usage? tissue that requires long term tensile strength, fascia, surgery on geriatric patients, smaller sizes used on opthalmic tissue
Monocryl, absorbable or nonabsorbable? absorbable
Monocryl, monofilament or multifilament? monofilament
Monocryl, color of packaging? coral or peach
Monocryl, color of suture strand? dyed: violet undyed: clear
Monocryl, tensile strength? 50-60% remains at 1 week, 20-30% remains at 2 weeks. Slight tissue reaction.
Monocryl, absorption rate? completed at 91-119 days by hydrolysis
Monocryl, common usage? general soft tissue approximation and/or ligation, subcuticular closure, general, gynecologic, urologic, and plastic surgery
Prolene, absorbable or nonabsorbable? nonabsorbable
Prolene, monofilament or multifilament? monofilament
Prolene, what is it made of? synthetic fiber
Prolene, tensile strength? excellent tissure reaction is less than any other synthetic material
Prolene, color of packaging? deep blue
Prolene, color of suture strand? blue, clear
Prolene,common usage? tissue that requires long-term strength, general, cardiovascular, plastics, continuous fascia closure, commonly used on mesh
Nylon, absorbable or nonabsorbable? nonabsorbable
Nylon, monofilament or multifilament? monofilament
Nylon, color of packaging? mint green
Nylon, color of suture strand? black, clear
Nylon, tensile strength? degrades 15-20% per year minimal tissue reaction
Nylon, common usage? skin closure, retention suture, small sizes are used for microsurgery and opthalmic procedures
Stainless steel, monofilatment or multifilament? monofilament
Stainless steel, tissue reaction? very little tissue reaction
Is stainless steel difficult to handle and if so, why? yes, because it is metal
Does stainless steel have a great knot security? yes
Is stainless steel the strongest among all the nonabsorbable sutures? yes
Can stainless steel suture cut through tissue? yes
Will stainless steel harbor bacteria? no
Vicryl, absorbable or nonabsorbable? absorbable
Vicryl, monofilament or multifilament? multifilament
Vicryl, color of packaging? violet
Vicryl, color of suture strand? dyed: violet undyed: beige, or off white
Vicryl, tensile strength? 50% retained in 21 days
Vicryl, absorption rate? minimal for 40 days, completed in 60-90 days
Vicryl, is made of what? synthetic, braided material
Vicryl, common usage? tissue that requires long-term tensile strength and absorbable tissue suture. General soft tissue approximation/ligation skin or mucosa
Can Vicryl be used in a contaminated wound? yes, unlike other multifilaments
Which suture is most commonly used today? Vicryl
Surgical silk, absorbable or nonabsorbable? nonabsorbable
Surgical silk, monofilament or multifilament? multifilament
Surgical silk, is made of what? natural fiber from silkworm cocoons
Surgical silk, tensile strength? high, most lost in 1 year tissue reaction: less than gut, more than synthetic
Surgical silk, common usage? serosa of gastrointestinal tract and fascia in absence of infection, frequently used for suture ligatures
Surgical silk, color of packaging? baby blue
Surgical silk, color of suture strand? black
Nurolon, absorbable or nonabsorbable? nonabsorbable
Nurolon, monofilament or multifilament? multifilament
Nurolon, color of packaging? mint green
Nurolon, color of suture strand? dyed: violet, green undyed: beige
Nurolon, is made of what? it is a braided nylon
Nurolon, tensile strength? very high minimal tissue reaction
Nurolon, common usage? general soft tissue approximation where continued strenth is necessary, commonly used for neurosurgical closures
Mersilene, absorbable or nonabsorbable? nonabsorbable
Mersilene, monofilament or multifilament? multifilament
Mersilene, color of packaging? turquoise
Mersilene, color of suture strand? green
Mersilene, what is it made of? braided polyester fiber
Mersilene, tensile strength? very high, no significant change known to occur
Mersilene, common usage? general soft tissue approximation where continued strength is necessary, respiratory tract and cardiovascular procedures
Suture sizes, large to small? #5 #4 #3 #2 #1 #0 2-0 3-0 4-0 5-0 6-0 7-0 8-0 9-0 10-0 11-0 bigger-----------------------------smaller
What should be identified on a suture packaging? order code, length , needle symbol, color, absorbable/nonabsorbable, suture size, name of suture
Swaged needle? less traumatic, more expensive, sterile
Taper (point) atraumatic, internal organs
Cutting (point) cutting edge on inside of circle, traumatic, skin
Reverse Cutting (point) cutting edge on outside of circle, skin, less traumatic than cutting
Shapes of needles 3/8 circle 1/2 circle straight specialty
Created by: SSpotwood