Busy. Please wait.
or

show password
Forgot Password?

Don't have an account?  Sign up 
or

Username is available taken
show password

why

Make sure to remember your password. If you forget it there is no way for StudyStack to send you a reset link. You would need to create a new account.

By signing up, I agree to StudyStack's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.


Already a StudyStack user? Log In

Reset Password
Enter the associated with your account, and we'll email you a link to reset your password.

Remove ads
Don't know
Know
remaining cards
Save
0:01
To flip the current card, click it or press the Spacebar key.  To move the current card to one of the three colored boxes, click on the box.  You may also press the UP ARROW key to move the card to the "Know" box, the DOWN ARROW key to move the card to the "Don't know" box, or the RIGHT ARROW key to move the card to the Remaining box.  You may also click on the card displayed in any of the three boxes to bring that card back to the center.

Pass complete!

"Know" box contains:
Time elapsed:
Retries:
restart all cards




share
Embed Code - If you would like this activity on your web page, copy the script below and paste it into your web page.

  Normal Size     Small Size show me how

Biomechanicss

Test 1

QuestionAnswer
What is biomechanics? application of mechanical principles in the study of living organisms.
Mechanics= analysis of the action of force.
What are the sub branches of biomechanics? statics, dynamics, kinematics, and kinetics.
What is statics? study of systems in constant motion, (including zero motion).
What is dynamics? study of systems subject to acceleration.
What is kinematics? study of the appearance or description of motion.
What is kinetics? study of the actions of forces.
What is kinesiology? the study of human movement.
What is sports medicine? an umbrella term that encompasses both clinical and scientific aspects of exercise and sport.
What is qualitative? pertaining to quality (without the use of numbers).
What is quantitative? involving numbers.
Superior is what? closer to the head.
Inferior is what? farther away from the head.
Anterior is what? toward the front of the body.
Posterior is what? toward the back of the body.
Medial is what? toward the midline of the body.
Lateral is what? away from the midline of the body.
Proximal is what? closer to the trunk.
Distal is what? away from the trunk.
Superficial is what? toward the surface of the body.
Deep is what? inside the body away from the surface.
Sagittal plane is what? in which forward and backward movements occur.
Frontal plane is what? in which lateral movements occur.
Transverse plane is what? in which rotational movements occur.
Sagittal= left and right.
Frontal= front and back.
Transverse= top and bottom.
Movements that occur in the sagittal plane? flexion and extension.
Movements that occur in the frontal plane? adduction and abduction.
Movements that occur in the transverse plane? external and internal rotation.
What is the mediolateral axis? around which rotations in the sagittal plane occur.
What is the anteroposterior axis? around which rotations in the frontal plane occur.
What is the longitudinal axis? around which rotational movements occur.
What are the forms of motion? linear, rectilinear, curvilinear, angular, and general.
Linear motion is what? motion along a line.
Rectilinear motion is what? motion along a straight line.
Curvilinear motion is what? motion along a curved line.
Angular motion is what? rotation around an axis.
General motion is what? a combination of linear and angular motion (includes most human motion).
What is a mechanical system? a body or portion of a body that is deliberately chosen by the analyst.
What is spatial reference systems useful for? standardizing descriptions of human motion.
The coordinate grid is most commonly called what? Cartesian coordinate system.
When doing a video you should plan for what? performer attire, lighting conditions, background, and use of video.
Mass is represented by what? m
Force is represented by what? F
Acceleration is represented by what? a
What is mass? quantity of matter composing a body.
What is units of mass? kg
What is acceleration? a change in motion.
F= ma
a= F/m
What are the units of acceleration? m/s2
What is force? a push or a pull.
What is the units for force? Newtons (N)
What is a vector? a vector is a visual representation of a force (typically using an arrow).
What is a net force? the single resultant force delivered from the vector composition of all the acting forces.
What is inertia? the tendency to resist change in state of motion.
What are the units for inertia? there are none!
What is momentum? a quantity of motion.
M= mv
The bigger the object the more? inertia it has.
The bigger the object the more? momentum it has.
What is torque? the rotary effect of a force.
T= Fd(perpendicular)
What is the center of gravity? point around which a body's weight is equally balanced in all directions.
What is weight? attractive force that the earth exerts on a body.
wt.= ma(gravity)
What is gravity? -9.8m/s2
What is the units of weight? N
What is pressure? force per unit of area over which the force acts.
What are the units for pressure? N/m2
What is stress? force per unit of area over which the force acts.
Pressure is usually used to describe force within distribution within what? a fluid.
Stress is usually used to describe force distribution within what? a solid.
What are the units for stress? N/m2
What is volume? space occupied by a body.
What are the three dimensions of volume? width, height, and depth.
What are the units for volume? m3 and cm3
What is density? mass per unit of volume.
How is density represented? rho (p).
What are the units of density? kg/m3
How much matter is in a certain object compared to its size is what? density.
What is specific weight? weight per unit of volume.
p= m/vol
y= F/vol
Specific weight is represented by what? gamma (y).
What are the units for specific weight? N/m3
What is impulse? the product of force and the time over which the force acts.
What are the units of an impulse? Ns
What are the types of stress? compression, tension, shear, bending, torsion, deformation, and repetitive and acute loading.
What is compression? pressing or squeezing force directed axially through a body.
What is tension? pulling or stretching force directed axially through a body.
What is shear? force directed parallel to a surface.
What is bending? asymmetric loading that produces tension on one side of a body's longitudinal axis and compression on the other side.
What is torsion? load producing twisting of a body around its longitudinal axis.
What is deformation? change in shape.
What is vector composition? process of determining a single vector from two or more vectors by vector addition.
A vector is what? it has a direction and a magnitude usually represented by the length of the arrow.
Vector resolution is what? operation that replaces a single vector with two perpendicular vectors such that the vector composition of the two perpendicular vector yields the original vector.
Prior to "boxing in your answer" after solving a problem, what should you do? make a "common sense" check of the answer.
What is considered the starting point for all body segment movements? anatomical position.
A girl riding a bicycle down a straight road is an example of what type of motion? general.
What type of spacial reference system uses body joint centers labeled with x and y coordinates? Cartesian coordinate system.
What two data bases are useful when looking up exercise science related articles? pubmed/medline and sport discus.
What is measured with the units "m/s"? velocity or speed.
What is inversely proportional to mass? acceleration.
If a force is further from an axis than the resistance, it is said to have a(n) what? mechanical advantage.
What is also called the center of mass? center of gravity.
What is -9.8 m/s2? acceleration of gravity.
True or False. More massive objects fall faster due to gravity? false.
A person wearing a high heel shoe will apply more what to the ground vs. a tennis shoe? stress.
Impulse= Ft
Inertia is proportional to what? mass.
When a runner steps into a deep hole, what kind of force is applied to the tibia? bending.
What is the zone called when a deformed object still returns to its original shape after the load is removed? elastic.
True or False. An object's deformation curve is set and does not change. False, it may change with the rate of loading.
A dislocated shoulder is usually the result of what type of loading? acute.
Tennis elbow is usually the result of what type of loading? repetitive.
When using vectors, how do you tell which force is the greatest? it will have the greatest length.
What is the units for force? Newtons (N)
What is a vector? a vector is a visual representation of a force (typically using an arrow).
What is a net force? the single resultant force delivered from the vector composition of all the acting forces.
What is inertia? the tendency to resist change in state of motion.
What are the units for inertia? there are none!
What is momentum? a quantity of motion.
M= mv
The bigger the object the more? inertia it has.
The bigger the object the more? momentum it has.
What is torque? the rotary effect of a force.
T= Fd(perpendicular)
What is the center of gravity? point around which a body's weight is equally balanced in all directions.
What is weight? attractive force that the earth exerts on a body.
wt.= ma(gravity)
What is gravity? -9.8m/s2
What is the units of weight? N
What is pressure? force per unit of area over which the force acts.
What are the units for pressure? N/m2
What is stress? force per unit of area over which the force acts.
Pressure is usually used to describe force within distribution within what? a fluid.
Stress is usually used to describe force distribution within what? a solid.
What are the units for stress? N/m2
What is volume? space occupied by a body.
What are the three dimensions of volume? width, height, and depth.
What are the units for volume? m3 and cm3
What is density? mass per unit of volume.
How is density represented? rho (p).
What are the units of density? kg/m3
How much matter is in a certain object compared to its size is what? density.
What is specific weight? weight per unit of volume.
p= m/vol
y= F/vol
Specific weight is represented by what? gamma (y).
What are the units for specific weight? N/m3
What is impulse? the product of force and the time over which the force acts.
What are the units of an impulse? Ns
What are the types of stress? compression, tension, shear, bending, torsion, deformation, and repetitive and acute loading.
What is compression? pressing or squeezing force directed axially through a body.
What is tension? pulling or stretching force directed axially through a body.
What is shear? force directed parallel to a surface.
What is bending? asymmetric loading that produces tension on one side of a body's longitudinal axis and compression on the other side.
What is torsion? load producing twisting of a body around its longitudinal axis.
What is deformation? change in shape.
What is vector composition? process of determining a single vector from two or more vectors by vector addition.
A vector is what? it has a direction and a magnitude usually represented by the length of the arrow.
Vector resolution is what? operation that replaces a single vector with two perpendicular vectors such that the vector composition of the two perpendicular vector yields the original vector.
Prior to "boxing in your answer" after solving a problem, what should you do? make a "common sense" check of the answer.
What is considered the starting point for all body segment movements? anatomical position.
A girl riding a bicycle down a straight road is an example of what type of motion? general.
What type of spacial reference system uses body joint centers labeled with x and y coordinates? Cartesian coordinate system.
What two data bases are useful when looking up exercise science related articles? pubmed/medline and sport discus.
What is measured with the units "m/s"? velocity or speed.
What is inversely proportional to mass? acceleration.
If a force is further from an axis than the resistance, it is said to have a(n) what? mechanical advantage.
What is also called the center of mass? center of gravity.
What is -9.8 m/s2? acceleration of gravity.
True or False. More massive objects fall faster due to gravity? false.
A person wearing a high heel shoe will apply more what to the ground vs. a tennis shoe? stress.
Impulse= Ft
Inertia is proportional to what? mass.
When a runner steps into a deep hole, what kind of force is applied to the tibia? bending.
What is the zone called when a deformed object still returns to its original shape after the load is removed? elastic.
True or False. An object's deformation curve is set and does not change. False, it may change with the rate of loading.
A dislocated shoulder is usually the result of what type of loading? acute.
Tennis elbow is usually the result of what type of loading? repetitive.
When using vectors, how do you tell which force is the greatest? it will have the greatest length.
Biomechanics is heavily used to treat and prevent sports-related injuries. True or False. True.
Space flight has special problems with it. After a long space flight what would you start to loose? bone mass, muscle mass, and cardiovascular performance.
This the branch of mechanics dealing with systems in a constant state of motion (could be at rest=no motion) statics.
What is the branch of mechanics dealing with systems subject to acceleration? dynamics.
This is a measurement term and is related to the dimensions and weights of body segments anthrometrics.
Most human motion is what? general.
What is an example of angular motion? merry-go-round.
What is an example of linear motion? slide tackling someone on the soccer field but the player ins't slide tackling from an angle so just straight on, in a straight line.
During all human angular motion, the axis or rotation is always through the body of the athlete. True or False. False.
Created by: danreid