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New PME V1

NCOA

QuestionAnswer
1.2 What is wrong with the position that any given broadly defined occupation is either a profession or it is not? 1.2 Only Dr not nurses are mbrs of the med prof. Only offcrs not enlisted are profs in the POA.The characteristics which determine an occupation's place on the Professions Continuum is not prestige or salary, but rather the 3 criteria already discussed.
1.1 When the dictionary definitions and the philosophical descriptions of the term "profession" are combined, what are the criteria for an occupation to be described as a profession? 1.1 A profession is an occupation that strongly exhibits the following characteristics: 1) A body of theory and specialized knowledge. 2) A service orientation. 3) A distinct sub-culture.
1.3 List unprofessional actions that should not be exhibited by NCOs. 1.3 1) Coasting through a career. 2) Considering oneself only a technical expert. 3) Discrimination. 4) Ignoring direction from your superiors and then asking for forgiveness later.
1.3 List unprofessional actions that should not be exhibited by NCOs. 1.3 5)Inflating EPRs. 6) Lack of self development. 7) Neglecting weak skill areas such as writing. 8) Only focusing upon one area of your job or responsibilities. 9) Poor Attitude 10) Purposely rushing to miss reveille and retreat.
1.3 List unprofessional actions that should not be exhibited by NCOs. 1.3 11) Seeing discipline violations and not correcting. 12) Sexual harassment. 13) Shabby wear of the uniform (rag bag syndrome) 14) Shying away from additional responsibility 15) Taking advantage of no supervision
1.3 List unprofessional actions that should not be exhibited by NCOs. 1.3 16) Understanding role model responsibilities. 17) Using personal bias in the evaluation process 18) Weak performance feedback or no performance feedback 19) Whining or complaining about everthing.
1.4 What motivates NCOs to choose to behave in a professional manner? 1.4 1) Are serious about the commitment and obligation sworn to in the oath of enlistment. 2) Associate with those with very high standards. 3) Have a sense of urgency. 4) Have had several good professional supervisors.
1.4 What motivates NCOs to choose to behave in a professional manner? 1.4 5) Have patriotic undertones driving personality. 6) See military service as serving a cause higher than self. 7) See themselves as serving a cause higher than themselves.
1.4 What motivates NCOs to choose to behave in a professional manner? 1.4 8) View the POA/military as a profession. 9) View themselves as more than a technician. 10) View themselves as profesional.
1.5 What is the impact of unprofessional behaviors upon the Air Force? 1.5 Degraded mission effectiveness; decrease in organizational efficiency; lack of subordinate growth and development; no mentorship; perpetuates a "just a job" attitude; discipline and morale suffer.
1.6 Why is it imprtant that we continue to move along the professional continuum? 1.6 If we all don't aspire to improve or enhance our level of performance and abide by the same core values and responsibilities everyday, then there is no way the profession as a whole can advance along the continuum of occupations.
1.6 Why is it imprtant that we continue to move along the professional continuum? 1.6 In other words, a weak link here and a weak link there will cause the entire organization to lose status. A continual move toward professionalism helps increase public trust of the military.
2.1 Give examples of how today's enlisted corps is significantly different than our predecessors in the areas of higher level responsibilities and education? 2.1 Enlisted mbrs are assuming tasks once exclusively reserved for mbrs of the offcr corps. Increased tasks, both tech & supervisory, are executed more capably cause the enlisted indvls involved have firm basis of prof understanding based on lvls of educ
2.2 How does the Profession of Arms subject area broaden our perspective of the military profession? 2.2 Bldg an apprec of our mmbrship in the POA. Providing info about events & issues that dictate mil missions. Teaching us about our history & culture. Ensuring we know the stands of our prof. Providing the foundation for NCO mentorship of subord.
2.3 What are the primary sources for our continued study and improvement? 2.3 1) CMSAF Professional Reading List. 2) AFM 10-100, Airman's Manual. 3) PFE 4) Various applicable AFIs, AFPs, AFMs, and AFDDs. 5) AF web sites and the various news and publication links it contains.
2.3 What are the primary sources for our cintinued study and improvement? 2.3 6) The Enlisted Heritage Research Institute web page. 7) The Air University Library web page. 8) The AFPC Personnel Issues web page.
3.1 What three core objectives steer our national strategy process? 3.1 Enhancing our own security, promoting democracy abroad, and bolstering America's economic prosperity.
3.2 What is the primary focus of National Security Strategy? 3.2 Focuses on the myriad of military threats that the nation must confront. Formulating a good strategy is placing emphasis on reducing and managing risk.
3.3 When was Airlift first used as a mechanism for National Security? 3.3 Maj Hazdra mentions in his book that airlift was first used as a tool of National Security through the Berlin Airlift. Airlift has now grown to deliver passengers, cargo, and fuel to operations worldwide in support of National Security.
3.4 Which command solely provides Air Mobility for the United States? 3.4 Air Mobility Command (AMC) si the single organization that performs air mobility for the United States.
3.5 How is National Security beneficial to National Security? 3.5 National Security Strategy, then, is an extension of National Security. National Security is utilizing air mobility resources effectively by adhering to the National Security Strategy.
3.5 How is National Security beneficial to National Security? 3.5 By doing this, we are preventing and limiting terrorist activity. National Security is the preservation of the United States as a free and independent nation with its fundamental institution intact.
3.6 Identify the three categories relative to determining a nation's needs and interests? 3.6 Military strategists focus primarily on three categories: relative interests, their intensity, and the risks involved.
3.7 Who is responsible for determining the nation's needs and interests? 3.7 Strategists must weigh heavily the nation's needs and interest.
3.8 Identify the four levels of intensity. 3.8 1) Survival 2) Vital 3) Major 4) Peripheral
4.1 How does National Power support National Security? 4.1 Strategy makers must match the instruments of power to the interests of the state. They must consider the interests and the instruments in existence to pursue those interests, which are matters of public policy choices.
4.1 How does National Power support National Security? 4.1 The choices are made in the political realm. Strategists must determine to what ends will the allocation of scarce or abundant resources be dispersed. Several other factors complicate the task of developing strategies for particular instruments.
4.1 How does National Power support National Security? 4.1 First, the instruments are highly interrelated and cannoth be viewed in solitude or isolation. A great example was noted in the book, Making Strategy An Introduction to National Security Processes and Problems.
4.1 How does National Power support National Security? 4.1 Mil spending is a significant part of the American economy, & the nation's economic health depends to some degree on diplomatic skill in negotiating favorable trade agreements with foreign gov'ts. To complete the circumference, diplomatic success depe
4.1 How does National Power support National Security? 4.1 In other words, treating the various instruments of power in isolation or solitude oversimplifies reality. The definitions of the instruments power were described candidly and in-depth by Col. Drew and Dr. Snow in their book.
4.2 Identify and explain the responsibilities for each instrument of power. 4.2 1)Mil Instrument is the extent to which a nation's armed forces can be employed to achieve nat'l ends.The potential use of the mil. instrument, even when its app is not threatened, always lurks in the background to condition internation relationships.
4.2 Identify and explain the responsibilities for each instrument of power. 4.2 2) Economic instruments of power- The degree to which the US government can manipulate economic assistance is limited by the comparatively small and static size of its assistance budget.
4.2 Identify and explain the responsibilities for each instrument of power. 3) Diplomatic instruments of power- The ability to meditate successfully and to produce unique and mutually acceptable solutions to complex issues without application of military or economic power is the essence of the diplomatic instrument.
4.3 Explain the relationship between each instrument of power. 4.3 Each of the instruments of power is, in fact, a combination of multiple factors, and any one factor can be crucial ina given situation. The diplomatic, political and economic instruments include the military instrument.
4.4 When do the strategists determine which instrument of power to utilize? 4.4 It is difficult to identify any index of mil pwr that allows prediction of a clash between 2 equal, or not so equal foes because many factors comprise mil prowess. The amt of manpwr and firepwr avail to any contestant, influences may prove critical.
4.4 When do the strategists determine which instrument of power to utilize? 4.4 Some factors are tangible, such as the length & security of supply lines, & others are more difficult to measure precisely, like morale, ldrship, strat & tactical soundness, compatibility between phys capabilities & political objectives & mere luck.
4.4 When do the strategists determine which instrument of power to utilize? 4.4 To a great extent, military history is a chronicle of calculation and miscalculation in comparing military history is a chronicle of calculation and miscalculation in comparing military instruments and their capacities to serve national ends.
5.1 Explain how National Strategy pricesses support National Security. 5.1 After identifying and assessing national objectives, the strategist must determine which instruments of national power are necessary to achieve the objectives and how those instruments are to be used.
5.1 Explain how National Strategy pricesses support National Security. 5.1 Grand Strategy is the art & science of coord the dvlpment & use of those instruments to achieve Nat'l Security obj. Political scientists often refer to Grand Strategy as policy.
5.2 What is the first step towards implementing a National Security Strategy? Why? 5.2 Strategists, also referred as policy makers, must ensure their decisions are concrete, defined, consistent, & supported by some degree of nat'l consensus. The U.S. (& its Allies) sought the surrender of the Axis powers-total & unconditional surrender.
5.2 What is the first step towards implementing a National Security Strategy? Why? 5.2 Such a stark objective formed a solid foundation on which to base strategy decisions, a fact underscored by the straightforward instruction given to Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower to enter the continent of Europe and destroy the German armed forces.
5.3 What is the difference between military strategy and operational strategy? 5.3 Military strategy sets in motion the actions required to develop a military force structure (i.e., planning; procuring weapon systems and material; and recuriting, training, and sustaining personnel) and then deploys that force structure.
5.3 What is the difference between military strategy and operational strategy? 5.3 Operational strategy employs the forces provided by mil strategy. Define operational strategy as the art & science of planning, orchestrating, & directing mil campaigns w/n a theater or ops to achieve Nat'l Security obj.
5.4 Differentiate between tactics and higher levels of strategy relative to battlefield strategy. 5.4 The classic differentiation between tactics & higher levels of strategy remains relevant in the sense that tactics govern the use of forces on the battlefield while grand strategy, mil strategy, & operational strategy bring forces to the battlefield.
5.4 Differentiate between tactics and higher levels of strategy relative to battlefield strategy. 5.4 One can also add some clarity to the situation by stating that tactics are concerned with doing the job "right" and higher levels of strategy are concerned with doing the "right" job.
6.1 How are national decisions defined? 6.1 Decisions about the content of grand strategy and the resources available to implement that strategy are products of political processes within the federal government.
6.2 What elements comprise the coordination of military strategy? 6.2 Comprised of employment, development, and deployment
6.3 Explain the coordination process. 6.3 Coordination is geared primarily to relationships between instruments of power at the grand strategy level and refers to relationships within the military instrument of power. The strategists attempt to coordinate the elements of military strategy.
6.3 Explain the coordination process. 6.3 The strategists must consider elements as how should the risks be managed; should they prepare for the worst case or the most likely case; & can one prepare for both possibilities, or would that raise the specter of not being prepared for either case.
7.1 How does Major Regional Conflict (MRC) affect National Security? 7.1 They pose a heavy demand on US forces and definitely drive most force requirements.
7.2 Identify the four phases of the department planning framework for MRC. 7.2 The four phases are identified as halting the invasion, force buildup, counter offensive, and ensuring postwar stability.
7.3 When does regional conflict exist? 7.3 Regional conflict exists anytime the use of military power by force is contemplated or activated.
8.1 Define terrorism. 8.1 "...unpredictable violence against gov'ts, publics, or individuals to attain a poltcl obj. It's been used by poltcl orgs w/ both rightist & leftist obj's, by nat'listic & ethnic grps, by revolutionaries, & by the armies & secret police of gov'ts.
8.2 Identify two terrorist groups. 8.2 The Baader-Meinhof gang of West Germany, the Japanese Red Army, Italy's Red Brigades, the Puerto Rican FALN, al-Fatah and other Palestinian organizations, the Shining Path of Peru, and France's Direct Action.
8.3 How do terrorist groups finance their violent activities? 8.3 Drug trafficking is at the top of their list of illegal money raising activities, followed by robbery, extortion, kidnapping, blackmailing and arms smuggling.
8.4 What is the responsibility of the HIDTA Program? 8.4 The HIDTA Program implemented to reduce the production, manufacturing, distribution, transportation and chronic use of illegal drugs, as well as the attendant money laundering of drug proceeds.
8.5 Which drug does the intelligence community believes has been the primary narcotics threat since 1985? 8.5 Cocaine
8.6 Which drug is the most widely abused and readily available, illicit drug in the United States? 8.6 Marijuana
8.7 How does international organized crime negatively impact our nation? 8.7 Drugs, terrorism, and organized crime are far better financed and more disciplined than previously suspected. Drug cartels have the ability to move literally hundreds of billions of dollars in and out of legitimate financial systems.
8.7 How does international organized crime negatively impact our nation? 8.7 Organized crime groups, particularly in Russia, now have almost a choke hold on the country's vast natural resources, & their banks and media. Russia has been described recently by the press as a kleptocracy from top to bottom, a semicriminal State.
8.7 How does international organized crime negatively impact our nation? 8.7 terrorist groups, including one's in Iran & Iraq, which are recruiting nuclear scientists to obtain nuclear weapons. These areas can cause our economy to weaken financially & reduce Nat'l Security while placing the U.S. in a vulnerable position.
9.1 What is the fundamental purpose of the US nuclear arsenal? 9.1 A fundamental purpose of the US nuclear arsenal is to deter an enemy's use of its nuclear arsenal or other weapons of mass destruction (WMD).
9.2 What three inter-related factors are viewed as the formula that produces deterrence? 9.2 Deterrence can be viewed as a product (not a sum) of three inter-related factors: capability, will (intent), and perception.
9.3 "One which has manufactured and exploded a nuclear weapon or other nuclear explosive device prior to January 1967" would be the definition of what key nuclear deterrence concept? 9.3 The NPT, opened for signature July 1, 1968, defined a Nuclear Weapon State (NWS), provided security for Non Nuclear Weapon States (NNWS), and provided incentives to sign.
9.3 "One which has manufactured and exploded a nuclear weapon or other nuclear explosive device prior to January 1967" would be the definition of what key nuclear deterrence concept? 9.3 Article IX, paragraph 3, of the NPT defines a NWS as "one which has manufactured and exploded a nuclear weapon or other nuclear explosive device prior to 1 January 1967."
9.4 Weapons system reliability and individual reliability are two key components of reliability when referring to nuclear weapons. How are each of these components implemented in the Air Force? 9.4 Weapons systems reliability is implemented through a comination of mechanical means, security programs, and different rules based on capabilities. Individual reliability has two key programs to enhance nuclear surety.
9.4 Weapons system reliability and individual reliability are two key components of reliability when referring to nuclear weapons. How are each of these components implemented in the Air Force? 9.4 The Personnel Reliability Program (PRP) ensures that only throse persons whose behavior demonstrates integrity, reliability, trust worthiness, allegiance, and loyalty to the U.S. shall be allowed to perform duties associated with nuclear weapons.
10.1 What does Information Warfare (IW) consists of? 10.1 Information Warfare (IW) consists of "actions taken to achieve info superiority in support of nat'l mil strategy by affecting adversary information and information systems while leveraging and protecting our own information and information systems.
10.1 What does Information Warfare (IW) consists of? 10.1 This formulation is intended to encompass military and non-military actions as well as offensive and defensive aspects. It also encompasses all levels of war from the tactical to strategic, and applies to peacetime and wartime conditions.
10.2 Describe the emphases of Offensive Information Warfare? 10.2 Offensive Information Warfare (IW) emphasizes the manipulation of electronic information systems to influence an adversary's perceptions and behavior.
10.2 Describe the emphases of Offensive Information Warfare? 10.2 This might, for example, involve disabling military and civilian telecommunication systems through computer viruses or electromagnetic pulse devices.
10.2 Describe the emphases of Offensive Information Warfare? 10.2 Infiltration is, however, the "maneuver of choice" since an enemy, unaware that his information sources have been compromised, will continue to trust them, creating opportunities for deception.
10.2 Describe the emphases of Offensive Information Warfare? 10.2 Offensive IW also emphasizes the use of direct broadcast satellites, the commercial media, and "visual stimulus and illusion" technologies such as holgraphy to conduct propaganda and subversion.
10.3 What does Defensive Information Warfare entail? 10.3 Defense Information Warfare (IW) requires an ability to detect & thwart attempts to tamper with one's own sources of info. In the military sphere, this entails assuring the integrity of command & control, communications, & intelligence systems.
10.3 What does Defensive Information Warfare entail? 10.3 Critical elements of the civilian infrastructure such as power grids, financial networks, and telecommunications systems must also be protected.
10.4 What is the American information infrastructure vulnerable to? 10.4 The American information infrastructure, which the US defense communications depends, is highly vulnerable to infiltration and sabotage.
10.5 Identify the nine critical issue areas of an infrastructure? 10.5 1) Fragmentation of responsibility 2) Technology 3) Architectural framework 4) People 5) Facilities 6) Data bases 7) Network Control 8) Threat and risk 9) Security in a global infrastructure.
10.6 What are the three keys to protecting the nations information infrastructure? 10.6 Provide the ability to protect the system from attack; detect an event when it is occurring & decide if it is an attack, a failure mode, or an isolated hacker; & react to the event in a way that minimizes the impact & restores & maintains capability
10.6 What are the three keys to protecting the nations information infrastructure? Protect! Detect! React!
11.1 How does MOOTW support National Security? 11.1 Military Operations Other Than War focus on deterring war, resolving conflict, promoting peace, and supporting civil authorities in response to domestic crisis.
11.2 What does Combat Operations of MOOTW include? 11.2 Typically, MOOTW involve combat operations entailing protection of shipping, enforcement of exclusion zones, counter air interdiction attack.
11.2 What does Combat Operations of MOOTW include? 11.2 MOOTW involving combat, such as peace enforcement, may have many of the same characteristics of war, including active combat operations and employment of most combat capabilities.
11.3 What is the goal of MOOTW during Noncombat? 11.3 As in war, the goal is to achieve national objectives as quickly as possible and conclude military operations on terms favorable to the United States and its allies.
11.3 What is the goal of MOOTW during Noncombat? 11.3 The purposes of conducting MOOTW may be multiple, with the relative importance or hierarchy of such purposes changing or unclear.
11.4 When is overlapping operations of MOOTW prevalent? 11.4 Overlapping Operations of MOOTW is demonstrated when combat MOOTW and noncombat MOOTW is conducted simultaneously.
12.1 How do space operations support National Security? 12.1 Space operations supports National Security by eliminating the use of hostile forces ability to disrupt navigation signals.
12.2 What responsibilities lie within space systems structure? 12.2 Space forces provide military leaders, operators and planners with enormous force enhancement products and services that are essential in achieving rapid dominance of the battle space.
12.2 What responsibilities lie within space systems structure? 12.2 Today's space systems provide key information via global communications, navigation, weather, warning, and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) to achieve full spectrum dominance across the range of military operations.
12.2 What responsibilities lie within space systems structure? 12.2 In addition, it affords a commanding view of operations and provides an important military advantage.
13.1 What is the EAF concept? 13.1 EAF is intended to improve our ability to rapidly deploy light, lean and lethal elements of air and space forces anywhere on the globe, while providing predictability and stability for all airmen.
13.1 What is the EAF concept? To meet this challenge, the AF assigned people and equipment from active-duty, Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve units into 10 Air and Space expeditionary forces, two crisis-response Air and Space expeditionary wings and five lead mobility wings.
13.2 What is the goal of the EAF? 13.2 The goal of the Expeditionary Air Force is to provide an integrated total force that is organized, trained and equipped to provide rapid responsive, tailored air and space forces in supprt of the global engagement mission.
13.2 What is the goal of the EAF? 13.2 It is designed to cope with the high tempo of operations experienced since the Gulf War.
13.3 Explain the deployment process of AEF? 13.3 Under the AEF concept almost all of the Air Force--active, Reserve and Guard--will be divided into 10 force packages, each with a cross-section of Air Force weapon systems drawn from geographically separated units.
13.3 Explain the deployment process of AEF? 13.3 Each AEF will have about 175 a/c, & each will be more formidable than the AFs of most nations. AEF pckgs will respond w/in 72hrs of any unexpected contingency and will be trained and tailored to meet CC's needs in a wide range of contingency ops.
13.3 Explain the deployment process of AEF? 13.3 Each AEF will be on call to handle continguency operations for about 90 days every 15 months. And two will be on call at all times. About half of each AEF to wait on call at home bases during the 90-day window and about half to deploy.
13.4 How does EAF/AEF support National Security? 13.4 EAF org & its AEF tool support Nat'l Security by increasing moral & retention among Amn, decreasiing the neg. effect that high op'l tempo has on Amn & presenting an organized, trained & equipped force to deal w/ threats to Nat'l Security.
14.1 What is the purpose of joint warfare and the desired outcome? 14.1 The purpose of joint operations is to combine forces and resources under organized leadership to maintain National Security. Joint warfare does not require that all forces participate in a particular operation merely because of their availability.
14.1 What is the purpose of joint warfare and the desired outcome? 14.1 Joint warfare operations were designed to ensure that military objectives are achieved in the most effective and efficient manner possible.
14.2 What is considered the bedrock of US military doctrine? 14.2 The principles of war are identified as the bedrock of US military doctrine.
14.3 What do the principles of war provide? 14.3 The principles of war provide the basis for the fundamentals of joint warfare and for the Services to develop their respective doctrine, tactics, techniques and procedures.
15.1 What was the name of the Berlin Airlift operation and its significance to air transport? 15.1 What was the name of the Berlin Airlift operation and its significance to air transport?
15.1 What was the name of the Berlin Airlift operation and its significance to air transport? 15.1 It brought valuable experience in operational techniques, air traffic control, and maintenance and reconditioning of aircraft. The airlift proved the future of military air transport lay in the development of larger cargo aircraft.
15.2 What air power lessons learned in World War II were further developed in the Korean War? 15.2 The experiences of the Korean War served to affirm some of the basic lessons learned about air power during World War II. The techniques and air tactics initiated during that war were developed further in Korea.
15.2 What air power lessons learned in World War II were further developed in the Korean War? 15.2 Namely, the Air Force's first use of jet aircraft in combat, the F-80 Shooting Star, and efficiency of air strikes through enhanced development of tactical air control.
15.3 What was the most significant use of air power during the Vietnam War? Why? 15.3 One of the most significant uses of air power during the Vietnam War was LINEBACKER II. LINEBACKER II was a precise and a highly concentrated attack on areas that had before been sanctuaries for North Vietnamese military effort.
15.3 What was the most significant use of air power during the Vietnam War? Why? 15.3 There was little doubt that the offensive played a key part in bringing about the North Vietnamese decision to sign the peace agreement on 15 Jan 1973.
15.4 What was the final analysis of air power from Desert Storm? 15.4 In the final analysis, in its swiftness, decisiveness, and scope, the coalition's victory came from the wise and appropriate application of air power. Air power found, fought, fixed, and finished the Iraqi military.
16.1 What significant contribution did the following individuals makie to Air Force enlisted heritage? 16.2 (1) Corporal Edward Ward - was the first enlisted man of the Aeronautical Division of the US Army Signal Corps, established 1 August 1907. As a balloon pilot, Corporal Ward was one of America's earliest aviation pioneers.
16.1 What significant contribution did the following individuals makie to Air Force enlisted heritage? 16.1 ((2) Corporal Frank S. Scott - First enlisted man to lose his life in an airfield accident (3) Corporal Eugene Bullard - The first black pilot and fighter pilot
16.1 What significant contribution did the following individuals makie to Air Force enlisted heritage? 16.1 (4) SSgt Esther M. Blake - 1st women in the AF, enlisted in the 1st minute of the 1st hr of the 1st day regular AF duty was auth for women. (5) CMSgt Grace E. Peterson - the first women to be promoted to the highest noncommissioned office grade.
Created by: Domo2007