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anatomy - joints

Anatomy terms and definitions related to joints

TermDescription
synarthroses (immovable articulations).—Synarthroses include all those articulations in which the surfaces of the bones are in almost direct contact, fastened together by intervening connective tissue or hyaline cartilage, and in which there is no appreciable motion,
Sutura Sutura.—Sutura is that form of articulation where the contiguous margins of the bones are united by a thin layer of fibrous tissue; it is met with only in the skull (Fig. 296).
Amphiarthroses (slightly movable articulations).In these articulations the contiguous bony surfaces are either connected by broad flattened disks of fibrocartilage, of a more or less complex structure, as in the articulations between the bodies of the vertebræ; or are u
Diarthroses freely movable articulations).—This class includes the greater number of the joints in the body. In a diarthrodial joint the contiguous bony surfaces are covered with articular cartilage, and connected by ligaments lined by synovial membrane (Fig. 299). T
Ginglymus or Hinge-joint In this form the articular surfaces are moulded to each other in such a manner as to permit motion only in one plane, forward and backward The best examples of ginglymus are the interphalangeal joints and the joint between the humerus and ulna; the knee-
Trochoid or Pivot-joint (articulatio trochoidea; rotary joint).—Where the movement is limited to rotation, the joint is formed by a pivot-like process turning within a ring, or a ring on a pivot, the ring being formed partly of bone, partly of ligament. In the proximal radioulna
Enarthrosis (ball-and-socket joints).—Enarthrosis is a joint in which the distal bone is capable of motion around an indefinite number of axes, which have one common center. Examples of this form of articulation are found in the hip and shoulder.
Created by: kermit12