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T1 Anatomy Quiz 2

NWCC Winter 2011 Anatomy Quiz 2

QuestionAnswer
What are the four muscles of the posterior thigh compartment? Semitendinosus; Semimembranosus; Biceps Femoris (Long and Short Head); Popliteus
The Semitendinosus muscle is in the ___ portion of the posterior thigh. Medial
Semitendinosus is medial to what muscle? Biceps Femoris
What is the origin of the Semitendinosus muscle? Ischial Tuberosity
What is the insertion of the Semitendinosus muscle? Anterior Proximal Tibial Shaft
The functions of the Semitendinosus are ____ of the femur; ___ of the knee; ___ rotation of the tibia when the knee is flexed. Extension; flexion; medial.
What nerve innervates the Semitendinosus muscle? Sciatic - Tibial division
The Semimembranosus muscle is deep to what muscle? Semitendinosus
Semimembranosus lies in the ___ portion of the posterior thigh. Medial
What is the origin of the Semimembranosus muscle? Ischial Tuberosity
What is the insertion of the Semimembranosus muscle? Posterior Medial Condyle of the Tibia
The functions of the Semimembranosus are ____ of the femur; ___ of the knee; ___ rotation of the tibia when the knee is flexed. Extension; flexion; medial.
What nerve innervates Semimembranosus? Sciatic - Tibial division
The Biceps Femoris has two heads; what are they? Which is more superficial? Long Head and Short Head. Long head.
Biceps femoris-long head originates where? Ischial Tuberosity
Where are insertions of biceps femoris-long head Lateral head of the Fibula; Lateral Condyle of the Tibia
The actions of biceps femoris-long head are ___ of the knee; ___ rotation of the tibia when the knee is ____; and ____ of the femur. Flexion; Lateral; flexed; Extension.
What nerve innervates biceps femoris-long head? Sciatic - Tibial division
Where is the origin of the Short Head of the Biceps Femoris? Linea Aspera of the Femur
Where is the insertion of the short head of the Biceps Femoris? Lateral head of the Fibula; Lateral Condyle of the Tibia
The action of the short head of the biceps femoris is ____ of the knee; and ___ rotation of Tibia when the knee is ____. Flexion; lateral; flexed.
The innervation of biceps femoris-short head is what? Sciatic - Fibular division
The Popliteus muscle is on the posterior ____ thigh. Inferior
The origin of the Popliteus muscle is where? Lateral Condyle of the Femur
The insertion of the Popliteus muscle is where? Posterior Proximal Tibial Shaft
The Popliteus muscle is involved in ___ rotation of the femur to 'unlock' the ____ knee to initiate knee _____. It also assists in ____ rotation of the tibia when the knee is ____." Lateral; extended; flexion. Medial; flexed.
What innervates the popliteus? Tibial Nerve
Sciatic nerve divides into what two branches? Tibial Nerve; Common Fibular.
The Common Fibular Nerve eventually divides into what two branches? Superficial Common Fibular; Deep Fibular
The Femoral Artery goes through the Adductor ___ and it becomes the ____ . It then splits deep to the ____ muscle into the Anterior and Posterior ____ . The Posterior ____ artery then branches off into the ____. Hiatus; Popliteus Artery. Soleal; Tibial Artery. Tibial; Fibular Artery.
What are the 6 muscles in the Posterior Leg? Gastrocnemius; Plantaris; Soleus; Tibialis Posterior; Flexor Digitorum Longus; Flexor Hallucis Longus
The Gastrocnemius muscle has what two heads? Medial and Lateral
Gastrocnemius is the most ___ muscle of the posterior leg. Superficial
What is directly below the Gastrocnemius muscle? Soleus
Where is the origin of the Medial head of the Gastrocnemius? Medial Epicondyle of the Femur
Where is the origin of the lateral head of the Gastrocnemius? Lateral Epicondyle of the Femur
Where is the insertion of both heads of gastrocnemius? Calcaneus via the Calcaneal tendon
What is another name for the Calcaneal tendon? Tendo Achilles
The action of the Gastrocnemius is _____ of the ankle and assists ____ of the knee. Plantarflexion; Flexion
The innervation of the Gastrocnemius is what? Tibial Nerve
The Soleus muscle is deep to what muscle? It is superficial to what three muscles? Gastrocnemius. Flexor Hallucis Longus; Flexor Digitorum Longus; Tibialis Posterior Muscle
What are the 3 origins of the Soleus muscle? The soleal line of the Tibia; Posterior Head of the Fibula; Upper Shaft of the Fibula
The insertion of the Soleus is where? Calcaneus via the Calcaneal Tendon
What innervates the soleus? Tibial Nerve.
What are the actions of the soleus? Plantarflexion of the ankle
The Plantaris muscle originates where? Lateral Epicondyle of the Femur
Plantaris inserts where? Calcaneus via the Calcaneal Tendon.
Plantaris assists ___ of the ankle and ____ of the knee. Plantarflexion; flexion
What innervates plantaris? Tibial Nerve
What 3 muscles attach to the Calcaneal Tendon? Gastrocnemius; Soleus; Plantaris
What are the origins of the Tibialis Posterior muscle? Posterior Tibia; Posterior Fibula; Interosseous Membrane
What are the two insertions for Tibialis Posterior? Navicular Tarsal Bone; Adjacent tarsals and metatarsals on plantar surface
What are the actions of Tibialis Posterior? Inversion of the foot; assists in Plantarflexion of the ankle
What is the nerve that inervates tibialis posterior? Tibial Nerve
What is the origin of the Flexor Digitorum Longus? The Posterior Tibia
What is the insertion for the Flexor Digitorum Longus? Distal Phalanges of 4 lateral toes (PLANTAR SURFACE)
The Flexor Digitorum Longus muscle is involved in the ____ of the 4 lateral toes at the ____ joints. Flexion; IP
Flexor digitorum longus assists____ of 4 lateral toes at ____ joints. Flexion; MP
Flexor digitorum longus also assists ____ of the ankle. Plantarflexion
What innervates flexor digitorum longus? Tibial Nerve
What is the origin of the Flexor Hallucis Longus? Posterior Fibula
What is the insertion of the Flexor Hallucis Longus? Distal Phalanx of great toe; plantar surface
What 3 actions does flexor hallucis longus have? Flexion of the great toe at MP joint; Flexion of great toe at IP joint; Assists Plantarflexion of ankle.
What is the nerve for flexor hallucis longus? Tibial Nerve
What are the 2 muscles of the lower leg lateral compartment? Fibularis Longus; Fibularis Brevis
The origin of the Fibularis Longus is what? Head and lateral shaft of Fibula (2/3)
What is the insertion of the Fibularis Longus? Base of 1st metatarsal (plantar surface) and medial cuneiform tarsal bone (plantar surface).
What is the action of fibularis longus? Eversion of the foot; assists in plantarflexion of the ankle
What is the nerve of fibularis longus? Superficial Fibular Nerve (L5; S1)
The Fibularis Brevis muscle originates where? Lateral shaft of the fibula
The insertion of fibularis brevis is? Base of the 5th metatarsal (lateral surface)
What 2 actions does fibularis brevis have? Eversion of the foot; Assists Plantarflexion of the ankle
What is the nerve of fibularis brevis? Superfical Fibular N (L5;S1)
The most superficial muscle in gluteal region is what muscle? Gluteus Maximus
Immediately deep to gluteus maximus is what muscle? Gluteus Medius
The third deepest muscle that makes up the gluteal group is what muscle? Gluteus Minimus
The 3 origins of the Gluteus Maximus are? Posterior Sacrum; Ilium (sacrotuberous lig.); Posterior (Superior) Gluteal Line of the Ilium
What are the 2 insertions of the Gluteus Maximus? Gluteal Tuberosity of femur; Iliotibial Tract
What are the 2 actions of the Gluteus Maximus? Extension of the femur; lateral rotation of the extended hip
What is the nerve for gluteus maximus? Inferior Gluteal Nerve (L5; S1; S2)
What are the 2 origins of the Gluteus Medius muscle? Iliac Crest; Illium (between superior and anterior gluteal lines)
What is the insertion of the Gluteus Medius muscle? Greater trochanter of the femur
What are the 2 actions of the Gluteus Medius? Abduction of the femur; ANTERIOR FIBERS-medial rotation of femur
What is the nerve of gluteus medius? Superior Gluteal Nerve
What is the origin of the Gluteus Minimus? Between what two lines? Posterior Ilium; between the anterior (middle) and inferior gluteal lines
Where is the insertion of gluteus minimus? Anterior surface of the greater trochanter of the femur
What are the 2 actions of gluteus minimus? Abduction; medial rotation of the femur
What is the nerve for gluteus minimus? Superior Gluteal Nerve
The Tensor Fasciae Latae originates where? Iliac crest-posterior to anterior iliac spine
Where does tensor fasciae latae insert? Iliotibial tract
Where does the Iliotibial tract eventually attach? Lateral condyle of the tibia
The actions of the Tensor Fascia Latae are ___ of the femur; ____ of the femur; ____ rotation of the femur; stability of the ___ knee in standing and ambulation; and ___ of the knee. Flexion; abduction; medial; extended; extension.
The nerve of tensor fasciae latae is? Superior Gluteal Nerve
The Quadratus Lumborum originates where? Iliac Crest of the Ilium (internal lip)
What are the two insertions for quadratus lumborum? Inferior margin of 12th rib; 1-4 Transverse Processes of lumbar vertebrae
Actions of quadratus lumborum are lateral ___ of trunk to same side. ____ of pelvis to same side if thorax and vertebral column are fixed. Stabilization of ___ rib during inspiration. Flexion. Elevation. 12th
Quadratus lumborum is innervated by what branches? T12; L1-L4 spinal nerves
L1-L4 spinal nerves are given what specific name? Ventral Rami
How many deep lateral rotators of the femur do we have? 6
Name 6 deep lateral rotators from superior to inferior. Piriformis; Superior Gemellus; Obturator Internus; Inferior Gemellus; Obturator Externus; Quadratus Femoris
The Piriformus muscle originates where? Pelvic surface of the sacrum
Piriformis inserts where? Greater trochanter of the femur
The nerve for piriformis? Sacral Plexus
The actions of piriformis? Laterally rotate the hip joint; abduction when the hip is flexed
The Superior Gemellus originates where? Spine of the Ischium
Superior gemellus inserts where? Greater trochanter of the femur
What is the nerve of superior gemellus? Sacral Plexus
What are the actions of superior gemellus? Laterally rotate the hip joint; Abduction when the hip is flexed
The Obturator Internus lies between what two muscles? Superior and Inferior Gemellus
Obturator internus originates at what two places? Interal or pelvic surface of the obturator membrane; margin of the obturator foramen.
Obturator internus inserts where? Greater trochanter of the femur
What is the nerve for obturator internus? Sacral Plexus
What are the actions of obturator internus? Laterally rotate the hip joint; abduction when the hip is flexed
The inferior Gemellus orginates where? Ischial Tuberosity
Inferior gemellus inserts where? Greater Trochanter of the femur
The nerve of inferior gemellus? Sacral Plexus
What are the actions of inferior gemellus? Laterally rotate the hip joint; abduction when the knee is flexed
The Obturator Externus originates at what two places? Rami of pubis and ischium; external surface of the obturator membrane
Obturator externus inserts where? Greater trochanter of the femur
What innervates obturator externus? Obturator Nerve
What are the actions of obturator externus? Lateral rotate the hip joint; ADDUCTION of hip joint
The Quadratus Femoris originates where? Ischial Tuberosity
Quadratus femoris inserts where? Quadrate Line
What innervates quadratus femoris? Sacral Plexus;
What are the actions of quadratus femoris? Laterally rotate the hip joint; adduction of the hip joint
The Sacrotuberous ligament is situated at the lower and back part of the ___. Pelvis
It runs from the ___ to the ___. Sacrum; Ischial Tuberosity
The Pes Anserinous is the insertion of 3 tendons from 3 muscles onto the ____ surface of the proximal tibia. What 3 muscles? Anteromedial. Sartorius; Gracilis; SemiTendinosus.
The ___ muscle is the longest muscle in the body. Sartorius
The origin of sartorius is where? Anterior Superior Iliac Spine
The insertion of sartorius is where? Upper medial shaft of the tibia
Sartorius assists ____ of femur; ____ of the femur; ___ rotation of the femur; ___ of the knee and assists ___ rotation of the tibia when the knee is ____ and foot is unweighted. Flexion; abduction; lateral; flexion; medial; flexed
Sartorius is innervated by what nerve? Femoral Nerve
The Quadriceps Femoris is made up of what 4 muscles? Rectus Femoris; Vastus Medialis; Vastus Intermedius; Vastus Lateralis.
The common action for the quadriceps femoris muscles is what? Extension of the knee
The Rectus Femoris is the most ____. It crosses both the ____ joint and the ___ joint. It is involved in ____ (action). Superficial. Knee joint and hip joint. Walking.
The origins of rectus femoris are the anterior ____ iliac spine and the ilium at the upper rim of the ____. Inferior; acetabulum.
The insertions of rectus femoris are what two things? Patella and Tibial Tuberosity (via the Patellar ligament).
The two actions of rectus femoris are? Extension of the knee; assists in flexion of the femur.
The nerve for rectus femoris? Femoral Nerve
The Vastus Medialis is medial to the ______. Rectus Femoris.
Vastus medialis originates at what two places? Linea Aspera and Intertrochanteric line of the femur
Vastus medialis inserts at what two places? Patella; Tibial Tuberosity via the Patellar Ligament
What is the action of vastus medialis? Extension of the knee
What is the nerve for vastus medialis? Femoral Nerve.
The Vastus ___ is deep to the Rectus Femoris and between the Vastus Medialis and Vastus ___. Intermedius. Lateralis.
Vastus intermedius originates where? Anterior and lateral femoral shaft.
Vastus intermedius inserts at what two places? Patella and Tibial Tuberosity via the Patellar Ligament.
Vastus intermedius' action is what? Extension of the knee
What innervates vastus intermedius? Femoral Nerve.
The Vastus Lateralis originates at what two places? Linea Aspera of the femur and Greater Trochanter of the femur.
Vastus lateralis inserts at what two places? Patella and Tibial Tuberosity via the Patellar Ligament
Vastus lateralis' action is what? Extension of the knee
The nerve of vastus lateralis? Femoral Nerve.
The iliopsas is made up of what two muscles? Psoas Major and the Iliacus
The Psoas Major originates at what transverse processes? At what vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs? Lumbar 1-5. T12-L5.
Psoas major inserts where? Lesser trochanter of the femur
The actions of the Psoas Major are ___ of the femur; ___ of the trunk at the lumbar spine; and assists ____ flexion of the trunk at the Lumbar spine. Flexion. Flexion. Lateral.
The nerves of psoas major? L2 L3 spinal nerves.
The Iliacus originates where? Iliac fossa of the Ilium.
Iliacus inserts where? Lesser trochanter of the femur
The action of iliacus? Flexion of the femur
Iliacus is innervated by what? Femoral Nerve
The Pectineus muscle is medial to the ____ and lateral to the ______. Iliopsoas. Adductor Longus.
Pectineus originates at the ___ ramus of the ____ pubis. Superior; Anterior
Pectineus inserts where? Pectineal line of the femur
The actions of pectineus are ___ of the femur; ____ of the femur; ___ rotation of the femur. Flexion; adduction; medial
The nerve for pectineus? Femoral N
The _________ muscle is not found in everyone. Psoas Minor
Psoas minor originates where? 12th thoracic vertebra
Psoas minor inserts where? Pelvic Rim
The nerve of psoas minor? L1 spinal nerve
What are the 4 muscles of the medial thigh? Gracilus; Adductor Longus; Adductor Brevis; Adductor Magnus.
The Gracilus originates at the ___ ramus of the anterior ___. Inferior; pubis.
Gracilus inserts where? Medial proximal tibia
Actions of gracilus are ___ of the femur; assists ___ of the knee; and ____ rotation of the tibia when the knee is flexed. Adduction; flexion; medial.
The nerve for gracilus? Obturator Nerve
Gracilus is the only ___ muscle to cross both the ___ and ___ joints. Adductor. Knee and hip.
The Adductor Longus originates where? Anterior Pubis
Adductor longus inserts where? Linea Aspera of the Femur
Actions of adductor longus are ____ of the femur; and assists in ___ of the femur. Adduction; Flexion.
Adductor longus is innervated by? Obturator N
The Adductor Brevis originates where? Anterior pubis (body and inferior ramus).
Adductor brevis inserts at what two places? Linea Aspera and Pectineal Line of femur
Adductor brevis has what two actions? Adduction of femur; Flexion.
What is the nerve for adductor brevis? Obturator
The Adductor Magnus has what two heads? Anterior Head and Posterior Head
The anterior head of adductor magnus originates where? Inferior ramus of the pubis
Adductor magnus-anterior head inserts where? Linea aspera of the femur
Adductor magnus-anterior head assists what 3 motions? Flexion and medial rotation of femur. Adduction of femur.
Adductor magnus-anterior head is innervated by what nerve? Obturator N
The adductor magnus-posterior head originates at what two places? Ischial Tuberosity and Ramus of Ischium
Adductor magnus-posterior head insertion is where? Adductor tubercle of femur
What 3 actions are associated with adductor magnus-posterior head? Extension of femur; lateral rotation of femur. Adduction.
The nerve for adductor magnus-posterior head? Sciatic N
What are the four muscles of the anterior leg? Tibialis Anterior; Fibularis Tertius; Extensor Digitorum Longus; Extensor Hallucis Longus
The common action for all 4 muscles of the anterior leg is what? Dorsiflexion of the foot
The common nerve for all four muscles of the anterior leg is what? Deep Fibular Nerve
The Tibialis Anterior muscle originates at what three places? Lateral condyle of the tibia; Lateral shaft of the tibia; Interosseus membrane
Tibialis anterior inserts at what two places? Base of the first metatarsal and the medial cuneiform (on plantar side)
What muscles insert at the base of the first metatarsal and medial cuneiform (on plantar side)? Tibialis posterior and Tibialis anterior
What are the two actions for Tibialis anterior? Inversion of the foot and Dorsiflexion of the ankle
What is the nerve for Tibialis anterior? Deep Fibular Nerve
The Fibularis Tertius originates where? Distal Anterior Fibula
Fibularis Tertius inserts where? Base of the 5th metatarsal on the lateral side
What muscles insert at base of the 5th metatarsal on the lateral side? Fibularis Tertius and Fibularis Brevis
What are the two actions of Fibularis Tertius and Fibularis Brevis? Eversion of the foot; Dorsiflexion of the ankle
What is the nerve of Fibularis Tertius and Fibularis Brevis? Deep Fibular Nerve
The Extensor Digitorum Longus originates at what two places? Lateral condyl of the tibia; proximal 2/3 of anterior fibular shaft
Extensor Digitorum Longus inserts where? Middle and distal phalanges of the 4 lateral toes
Extensor Digitorum Longus actions are what? Dorsiflexion of the ankle; extension of the 4 lateral toes at the MP joints
The nerve for Extensor Digitorum Longus? Deep Fibular Nerve
The Extensor Hallucis Longus originates at what two places? Anterior shaft of the fibula; Interosseus Membrane
Extensor Hallucis Longus inserts where? Base of the distal phalanx of the great toe
Extensor Hallucis Longus actions are what? Dorsiflexion of the ankle; extension of the great toe at the IP and MP joints
The nerve for Extensor Hallucis Longus? Deep Fibular Nerve
Rectus abdominus originates at what 2 places? Pubic Symphysis and Pubic Crest
Rectus abdominus inserts where? Ribs 5-7 costal cartilages and Xiphoid Process
The actions of Rectus Abdominus are ___ of the trunk; and compression and support of abdominal ___. Flexion; Viscera.
The nerve for Rectus Abdominus? Thoracoabdominal nerves T7-11
The External oblique's originate where? Ribs (5-12)
External oblique's insert at what three places? Linea Alba; Pubis; Anterior Iliac Crest.
The actions for External oblique's bilaterally are ___ of the trunk and compression and support of _______. Flexion; abdominal viscera
Unilaterally; External oblique's actions are ___ flexion of trunk and ____ of trunk to opposite side. Lateral; rotation.
The nerves for External obliques? Thoracoabdominal nerves (7-11) and subcostal nerve T12.
The internal oblique's originate on the ___ ligament; ____ iliac crest; and thoracocolumbar ____. Inguinal; Anterior; Aponeurosis
Internal oblique's insert at the lower ___ ribs (# ___ thru ___); abdominal ____; and the Linea ____. 4 (9-12); aponeurosis; Alba.
Actions bilaterally for internal obliques are ____ of trunk; compression and support of the abdominal viscera. Flexion.
Unilaterally; internal oblique's actions are ____ flexion of trunk and ____ of trunk to SAME side. Lateral. Rotation.
The nerves for internal obliques? Thoracoabdominal nerves T7-T12; L1.
The Transverse abdominus originate on the ___ ligament; the ___ crest; the ____ aponeurosis and ribs ___ thru ___. Inguinal; iliac; thoracolumbar; 7 thru 12.
Transverse abdominus inserts on the ___ aponeurosis; the ___ alba; and the ____. Abdominal. Linea. Pubis.
Action of Transverse abdominus? Compression and support of the abdominal viscera.
Nerves for Transverse abdominus? Thoracoabdominal nerves T7-12 and L1.
The longest muscle in the body is what? Sartorius
What is the most superficial muscle of the thigh? Sartorius
What is the strongest hip flexor? Iliopsoas
What muscle of the quadriceps femoris is the only one to originate on the pelvis and cross both the hip and knee joint? Rectus Femoris
Which of the three vastus muscles is the largest? Vastus Lateralis
What is the only hip adductor that is supplied by the femoral nerve? Pectineus
Of the adductor group; what is the largest; deepest; and most powerful of the group? Adductor Magnus
The Gluteus Maximus muscle is mostly used for what? Power
Which muscle prevents controlateral hip drop while walking? Gluteus Medius
The arrangement of the hamstrings at the distal end of the thigh from lateral to medial is what? Biceps Femoris; Semitendinosus; Semimembranosus
Which muscle is the strongest of the dorsiflexors? Tibialis Anterior
Shin splits result from overuse of what muscle? Tibialis Anterior
What muscle raises the heel during running and jumping? Gastrocnemius
Triceps Surae refer to what muscles? Gastrocnemius and Soleus
What are the muscle, artery, and nerve components around the lateral malleolus? Tibialis Posterior; Flexor Digitorum Longus; Posterior Tibial ARTERY; Tibial NERVE; Flexor Hallucis Longus
What is the deepest muscle of the posterior leg? Tibialis Posterior
The Plantaris muscle lies between what two muscles? Gastrocnemius and Soleus
Plantaris is ____ on the posterior knee Superficial
What is the deepest muscle on the posterior knee joint? Popliteus
Popliteus is the key that _____ the knee joint. UNLOCKS
How many layers of muscles are in the foot? 4
What muscles are in the first layer of the foot? Abductor Hallucis; Flexor Digitorum Brevis; Abductor Digiti Minimi
What muscles are in the 2nd layer of the foot? Lumbricals; Quadratus Plantae
What muscles are in the 3rd layer of the foot? Flexor Hallucis Brevis; Adductor Hallucis; Flexor Digiti Minimi Brevis
What muscles are in the 4th layer of the foot? Dorsal Interossei (4 of them)
What are the 8 flexors of the femur? Psoas Major/Iliacus; Pectineus; Tensor of Fasciae Latae; Adductor Brevis; Adductor Longus; Adductor Magnus (Anterior Head); Rectus Femoris; Sartorius
What are the 5 extensors of the femur? Gluteus Maximus; Biceps Femoris (long head); Semitendinosus; Semimembranosus; Adductor Magnus (posterior head)
What are the adductors of the femur? Adductor Brevis; Adductor Longus; Adductor Magnus; Gracilus; Pectineus
What are the abductors of the femur? Gluteus Medius; Gluteus Minimus; Tensor of Fascia Latae; Sartorius
Lateral Rotators of the Femur? Piriformis; Superior Gemellus; Obturator Internus; Inferior Gemeullus; Obturator Externus; Quadratus Femoris; Gluteus Maximus; Sartorius; Adductor Magnus (posterior head)
Medial rotators of the femur? Gluteus Medius (anterior fibers); Gluteus Minimus; Tensor of Fascia Latae; Adductor Magnus (anterior head); Adductor Longus; Pecinteus
Flexors of the knee? Biceps Femoris; Semitendinosus; Semimembranosus; Sartorius; Gracilus; Gastrocnemius; Plantaris; Popliteus
Extensors of the knee? Vastus lateralis; Vastus intermedius; Vastus lateralis; Rectus femoris; Tensor of fasciae latae
Medial rotators of the knee; rotates tibia when knee is flexed. Semitendinosus; Semimembranosus; Popliteus; Gracilius; Sartorius
Lateral rotators of the knee; rotates femur when knee is extended. Popliteus
Lateral rotators of the knee; rotates tibia when knee is flexed Biceps Femoris
Dorsiflexors of the ankle? Tibialis Anterior; Extensor Digitorum Longus; Extensor Hallucis Longus; Fibularis Tertius
Plantarflexors of the ankle? Gastrocnemius; Plantaris; Soleus; Tibialis Posterior; Flexor Digitorum Longus; Flexor Hallucis longus; Fibularis Longus; Fibularis Brevis
Invertors of the foot? Tibialis Anterior; Tibialis Posterior
Evertors of the foot? Fibularis Longus; Fibularis Brevis; Fibularis Tertius
The Femoral nerve has what specific branches? L2; L3; L4
The femoral nerve passes through the ___ ____ muscle; then runs deep to the ____ ligament and just lateral to the ___ artery. Adductor Magnus; Inguinal Ligament; Femoral Artery
After entering the thigh; the femoral nerve sprays out into its distributing branches; how many groups of branches? 3
What are the 3 different groups of femoral nerve distributions? Muscular Branches; Cutaenous Branches; Articular Branches
The Muscular Branches of the femoral nerve go to the ___ within the abdomen and to the ____ compartment of the thigh; what muscles specifically? Iliacus; anterior. Quadriceps Femoris; Pectineus; Sartorius.
What are the 3 Cuteaneous branches of the femoral nerve? Medial cutaneous nerves; intermediate cutaneous nerves; saphenous nerve
The medial and intermediate cutaneous nerves of the thigh go to the ____ of the anterior thigh. Skin
The Saphenous nerve passes through the ____ ____ to supply the skin of the ___ leg; ankle; and foot to the great ____. Adductor canal; medial; toe.
The Articular branches go to what joints? Knee and hip joints
The Obturator nerve has what specific branches? L2; L3; L4
The obturator nerve emerges from the medial border of the ___ ___ muscle. It then passes inferiorly and anteriorly (deep to the internal ____ vessels) and enters the ___ ____. Psoas Major. (Iliac). Obturator Foramen.
Obturator nerve passes through the foramen along with the ____ vessels to supply the ___ thigh. Here; it divides into an anterior branch (anterior to the ___ ____) and a posterior branch (poster to the ___ ____). Obturator. Medial. Adductor Brevis. Adductor Brevis.
The muscular branches of the obturator nerve innervate the ___ compartment of the thigh muscles; which are what specific muscles? Medial; adductors; obturator externus; gracilis.
The cutaneous branches of the obturator nerve supply the ____ of the ___ thigh. Skin; medial.
The articular branches supply the __ and ____ joints. Knee and hip joints.
What are the specific branches of the Sciatic Nerve? L4 L5 S1 S2 S3
Sciatic nerve is the ___ nerve of the body. Largest
Proximally; sciatic nerve is flat and ____. Distally; it becomes ____. Wide. Round.
Sciatic nerve emerges from the greater ____ foramen; which is inferior to the ____ and deep to the ___ ____. Sciatic. Piriformis. Gluteus Maximus.
Sciatic nerve crosses the posterior surface of the _____; tendon of the obturator ____; and quadratus femoris muscles. It then descends on the ___ ____ muscle. As it passes downward; it lies deep to the ___ muscles. Gemelli. Internus. Adductor Magnus. Hamstrings.
The sciatic nerve has two divisions; what are they? Tibial and Common Fibular Nerve.
Usually; visible separation of tibial and common fibular nerve occur ___ ; but it may vary anywhere from the ____ area to mid-thigh. Mid-thigh. Gluteal.
The distribution of the sciatic nerve is to the ___ compartment of the thigh muscles or ___ muscles; and adductor ____. Posterior. Hamstring. Magnus.
All the muscular branches of the sciatic nerve except the one to the ____ head of the biceps femoris arise from the ____ division of the sciatic nerve. The short head is supplied by the ___ ____ division. Short. Tibial. Common Fibular.
All the muscular branches except the ___ head originate from the ___ side of the nerve; so its ___ side is the side of least risk in penetrating wounds to the thigh. Short. Medial. Lateral.
Penetrating ___ thigh wounds may easily injure the sciatic nerve. Since the nerve travels just posterior to the ____; it is vulnerable to injury from a ___ dislocation of the hip resulting from a posterior lip fracture of the ____. Posterior. Acetabulum. Posterior. Acetabulum.
The specific branches of the Tibial nerve are what? L4 L5 S1 S2 S3
The Tibial nerve is the ____ of the branches from the Sciatic nerve. As it travels through the ___ fossa; it lies just ___ to the popliteal artery and vein. Largest. Popliteal. Posterior.
The tibial nerve descends immediately deep to the ___ muscle along with the ____ tibial vessels; passes with them behind the ____ malleolus; and ends by dividing within the ___ foot into the ___ and ___ plantar nerves. Soleus. Posterior. Medial. Plantar. Medial and Lateral.
The muscular branches within the popliteal fossa go to the ____ compartment leg muscles; what four muscles? Posterior; Popliteus; Gastrocnemius; Soleus; Plantaris.
The cutaneous branch of the tibial nerve is called the ___ nerve. This passes down the ___; posterior to the ___ malleolus; then to the ___ toe. Thus the nerve innervates ___ of the lateral side of the leg; foot; and fifth toe. Within the ___ fossa; it re Sural. Calf. Lateral. 5th. Skin. Popliteal. Communicating. Fibular.
The articular branches supply the ___ joint. Knee.
The tibial nerve supplies 3 additional posterior leg compartment muscles; what are they? Tibialis Posterior; Flexor Hallucis Longus; Flexor Digitorum Longus.
Plantar ___ and intrinsic plantar ___ muscles are supplied by its terminal branches: the medial ___ nerve and the lateral ___ nerve. Skin. Foot. Plantar. Plantar.
The common fibular nerve has what specific branches? L4 L5 S1 S2
The common fibular nerve is ____ than the tibial nerve branch of the sciatic nerve. The common fibular nerve passes downward from the sciatic nerve through the upper part of the ___ ____; just medial to the tendon of the ___ ____. Smaller.Popliteal Fossa. Biceps Femoris.
It then travels around the neck of the ____ and into the ___ ____ muscle. Here it ends by dividing into its terminal branches; the ____ and _____ ____ nerve within the ___ ___ muscle. Fibula. Fibularis Longus. Deep and Superficial Fibular. Fibularis Longus.
In the ___ fossa; the common fibular nerve gives off the lateral ___ ___ nerve to the skin of the upper lateral calf. It gives the ___ communicating branch to the ___ nerve and ____ branches to the knee joint. Popliteal. Sural cutaneous. Sural. Sural. Articular.
The ___ fibular nerve passes into the ___ compartment of the leg; deep to the ___ ____ ___ muscle. It then descends along with the ___ ___ vessels on the anterior surface of the ____ membrane and ankle. Deep. Anterior. Extensor Digitorum Longus. Anterior Tibial. Interosseus.
The muscular branches of the deep fibular nerve go to the muscles of the ___ leg; what are they? (5). Anterior. Tibialis Anterior; Extensor Hallucis Longus; extensor Digitorum Longus; Fibularis Tertius; Extensor Digitorum Brevis.
The cutaneous branches go to the skin web where? Between 1st and 2nd toes.
The superficial fibular nerve descends in the ____ compartment of the leg. Lateral.
The muscular branches supply what muscles? Fibularis Longus and Fibularis Brevis.
The cutaneous branches go to the skin of lower ____ of the lateral ____ leg and to the ___ of the foot. 2/3; anterior; dorsum.
The common fibular nerve is exposed to possible injury as it passes around where? Neck of the Fibula.
The common fibular nerve is vulnerable to ____ injuries of the knee or pressure from a leg cast or tight bandage. Pressure
Signs of injury to the common fibular nerve are ____ of the foot caused by paralysis of ____ compartments that evert the foot and ___ ____ due to paralysis of anterior compartment muscles that dorsiflex the foot. Inversion. Lateral. Foot drop.
There is skin ____ of the lateral and anterior leg and the ___ of the foot. However; because the skin of the medial leg is suppled by the ____ branch of the femoral nerve; it is ____ affected. Anesthesia. Dorsum. Saphenous. NOT.
An Anastomosis is an area where there is ____ circulation; which means there is more than one route available to do what? Collateral; to get blood to an area
3 places in the body where anastomoses are lacking; what are they? Body; Brain; Kidneys
The Aorta branches into the ___ iliac at what vertebra? Common; L4
The common iliac branches into what two branches? External and Internal
The internal iliac supplies what cavity? The Pelvic Cavity
The external iliac reaches the ____ ligament and becomes the ___ artery. Inguinal; Femoral
The upper border of the Femoral Triangle is what? Inguinal Ligament
The lateral border of the femoral triangle is the medial border of the ___ muscle. Sartorius
The medial border of the femoral triangle is the medial border of the __ ___ muscle. Adductor Longus
The roof of the femoral triangle is __ ___. Fascia Lata
The floor of the femoral triangle is made up of what four muscles? Iliopsoas; Pectineus; Adductor Longus; Adductor Brevis
The apex of the femoral triangle leads to what? Adductor Canal
From lateral to medial; what are the components of the femoral triangle? Femoral Nerve; Femoral Artery; Femoral Vein; Femoral Lymphatics
The femoral artery terminates at the ___ ___; which is an opening into what muscle? Adductor Hiatus; opening to Adductor Magnus Muscle
The most proximal branch of the femoral artery is the superficial _____ artery. This is located above the ____ ligament. This artery supplies the inguinal ___ ___ and the skin above the ___ ligament. Epigastric. Inguinal. Lymph Nodes. Inguinal.
The Superficial ____ Iliac Artery runs ____ to the inguinal ligament to the ___ ___. This supplies the ___ inguinal lymph nodes and skin. Circumflex. Parallel. Iliac Crest. Superficial.
The Superficial External ____ artery is a ___ branch of the femoral artery. It supplies the ___ of the lower abdomen and the external ____. Pudendal. Medial. Genitalia.
The ___ External _____ artery is deeper than the superficial external pudendal artery. It passes across the ____ muscle and the ____ ___ muscle. It supplies the external ___ Deep; Pudendal. Pectineus; Adductor Longus. Genitalia.
The Muscular Branches of the femoral artery supply the ___ and ____ compartments of the ___. Give some muscle examples. Anterior; medial. Thigh. Quadriceps; Adductors.
The ____ femoris is the deepest branch of the femoral artery. Profunda
The medial femoral ____ is a medial branch off of the ____. It winds around the ___ side of the femur. It forms an ____ with the ____ femoral circumflex artery; the ___ gluteal artery; and the first ____ branch. This is called the ____ anastomosis. Circumflex; Profunda artery. Medial. Anastomosis. Lateral; Inferior; perforating. Cruciate.
What are the four parts to the cruciate anastomsis? Medial Femoral Circumflex; Lateral Femoral Circumflex; Inferior Gluteal artery; first perforating branch.
What muscles are supplied by the medial femoral circumflex artery? Adductors; obturator externus; acetabulum; head of the femur.
The Lateral Femoral ____ artery is a lateral branch off of the ___ artery. It winds around lateral side of the ____; contributes to the ___ anastomosis. Supplies what specific muscle? Circumflex; Profunda. Femur. Cruciate. Vastus Lateralis.
The perforating arteries that branch off of the femoral artery usually come with ___ in number. They perforate the __- ___ muscle. The ___ perforating contributes to the cruciate ____. This artery supplies what muscles? Three. Adductor Magnus. First. Anastomosis. Gluteus maximus. Adductors. Hamstrings.
The Popliteal Artery is located in the ___ fossa. Popliteal
This is the continuation of the ___ artery. It begins at the ___ ____ and ends at the inferior border of ____ where it bifurcates into the anterior and posterior ___ artery. Femoral. Adductor Hiatus. Popliteus. Tibial.
The Popliteal Artery supplies the distal parts of the ___ magnus and hamstrings. It also supplies the superficial 3 muscles of the posterior leg; what are the 3? Adductor. Gastrocnemium; Soleus; Plantaris.
The Popliteal Artery supplies the skin over what? Popliteal Fossa
The Genicular Arteries are branches off of the ___ artery. Popliteal
The Genicular Artery supplies the ___ joint; ligaments; and the ____. Knee; Popliteus.
How many branches off of the genicular arteries? 5
What are the names of 5 genicular branches? Superior medial genicular; Inferior medial Genicular; Middle Genicular; Superior lateral; Inferior Lateral
The posterior tibial artery begins at the bifurcation of the ____ artery and passes downward along the posterior leg to divide into medial and lateral ____ arteries. Popliteal. Plantar arteries.
The posterior tibial artery provides what two compartments with a blood supply? Posterior and Lateral compartments.
A major branch off of the posterior tibial artery is the ___ artery. This supplies what two compartments? Fibular; Posterior and Lateral Muscle compartments.
The Medial Plantar Artery supplies the medial side of the ___ and the first ___. Foot. Toe.
The lateral plantar artery along with the deep plantar branch of the ___ pedis forms the ___ arch. Dorsalis; Pedis.
The Anterior Tibial Artery penetrates the _____ membrane; then runs on the membrane's anterior surface with the ___ ____ nerve. Interosseus; Deep Fibular
The anterior tibial artery supplies the ____ compartment muscles of the leg. Anterior
The Anterior Tibial Artery has two important branches off of it; what are they? Anterior Medial Malleloar Artery; Anterior Lateral Malleolar Artery.
The Anterior Medial Malleolar Artery supplies what? Medial ankle
The Anterior Lateral Malleolar Artery supplies what? Lateral ankle
The Dorsalis Pedis Artery is the continuation of what artery? Anterior tibial artery
Pedis artery passes anteriorly from the ankle joint; along the ___ side of the dorsum of foot to the proximal part of ____ intermetatarsal space where it divides into what 3 branches? Tibial. First. Arcuate Artery; 1st Dorsal Metatarsal artery; Deep Plantar Branch
The Arcuate Artery gives off the dorsal ____ arteries which then turn into the dorsal __ arteries. Metatarsal; digital arteries
The Deep Plantar Branch of the ___ pedis artery penetrates the ____ surface and with the lateral ___ artery forms the ____ arch. Dorsalis; plantar. Plantar. Plantar
Veins are divided into ____ and ____ groups that anastomose quite freely with each other. Superficial and deep.
___ veins lie in superficial fascia; just under the ___. Superficial; Skin.
___ veins accompany the arteries. Deep
What are the 2 superficial veins we are required to know? Great Saphenous Vein; Small Saphenous Vein.
The longest vein in the body is what? Great Saphenous Vein
Great saphenous vein is on the ___ aspect of the lower limb. It ends by passing through the saphenous ___; which is an opening in the ___ ____. It then drains into the ____ vein. Medial. Hiatus. Fascia Lata. Femoral.
The great saphenous vein drains sole and ___ of foot (via the digital; dorsalmetatarsal; and ____ ___arch) and thigh. Dorsum. Dorsal venous.
The small saphenous vein passes behind what? Lateral malleolus
Small saphenous vein drains the ___ foot and ____ leg. It ends as a tributary to the ____ vein. Lateral. Posterior. Popliteal vein.
Deep veins accompany the corresponding ____ and are in pairs called ___ ____. One member being on each side; they ____ at intervals across the artery. Artery; Venae Comitantes. Communicate.
Know the 7 deep veins. Of the 7; ___ are single veins; not venae comitantes. Three
The 7 deep veins we need to know are the ____ digital veins; the posterior ___ vein; ____ (peroneal) vein; Anterior ____ vein; Popliteal vein; Femoral vein; and ____ femoris vein. Plantar; Tibial; Fibular; Tibial; Profunda.
Arteries carry blood ____ from the heart. USUALLY it is ____ blood. Give an exception. AWAY. Oxygenated. Pulmonary artery (deoxygenated blood)
Veins carry blood ___ the heart. USUALLY it is ____ blood. Give an exception. TOWARDS. De-oxygenated. Pulmonary vein (oxygenated blood).
What are the processes coming off an artery called in which the blood flows in a different direction? Blood is ____ the main vessel. Branches. Leaving.
What are the processes on veins called in which blood flows in the same direction? Blood is flowing ____ the main vessel. Tributaries. INTO.
What is endomysium? CT that surrounds individual muscle cells
Endomysium holds what in place? Muscle cells; Capillaries; Nerve fibers
The ____ is CT which surrounds and holds groups of muscle fibers together into a unit. Parimysium
A group of muscle fibers is called a ____. Fasicle
___ are the smallest muscle unit visible to the naked eye. Fasicles
Fasciles are termed "____" by gross anatomists. Fibers
____ is the outer CT covering of an individual muscle. Epimysium
Epimysium holds muscle ____ in place and together to form the complete muscle. Fasicles
Epimysium s sometimes called ____ _____. Muscle fascia
___ ____ is external to the epimysium. Sometimes it is even ____ with it. Deep Fascia. Fused.
Epimysium invests body ____. For example; deep fascia of the thigh is called ___ ___ of the thigh. Portions. Fascia Lata
Epimysium provides intermusclar ____ which arrange muscles into ____ compartments. For example it separates the posterior thigh from the anterior thigh. Septa. Functional.
Epimysium also surrounds individual ____ and separates them from their neighbors so they can do what? Muscles; move freely.
The ____ fasica is a fatty layer deep to the ___. Superficial. Skin.
There are ___ different ways that a muscle may be attached. 4
Attachment of a muscle directly to the ___ of a bone via ___ ___. Periosteum; connective tissue (CT).
An example of periosteum muscle connection would be what? Vastus Lateralis.
A muscle may attach to a bone via a ____ which merges with the ____. Tendon; Periosteum.
An example of tendon attachment is the ___ tendon. Achilles
A muscle may attach to a ___ sheet of fibrous CT called ______. The ____ then connects the muscle to another ____ or a ____. Flat; Aponeurosis. Aponeurosis; Muscle or bone.
An example of when the Aponeurosis connects the muscle to a bone is the ___ ____. Latissimus Dorsi.
An example of when the aponeurosis connects the muscle to another muscle is the ___ ____. External Obliques.
A muscle may attach to another muscle via a ____; which is a line of union between two _____ muscles. Raphe; different.
An example of a raphe connection is the _____ muscle. Mylohyoid.
The origin of a muscle is the ____ end of a muscle. It is the attachment of a muscle to an area of the body which does ____ move. Fixed. NOT
The insertion of a muscle is the ____ end of a muscle. It is the attachment of a muscle to an area of the body which ____ move. Moveable. DOES.
In the limbs; the origin is ____. The insertion is ____. Proximal. Distal.
Sometimes there can be reversal of the origin and insertion. This means that the ____ is now moveable and the ____ is now fixed. Origin. Insertion.
The range of contraction is determined by the ____ of the muscle ____. Length; fasicles
When the _____ contracts; it decreases the length by ___%. Fasicles; 57%
Longer fasciles have ____ range of contraction. Greater
They have the same ____ of contraction; but ____ fasicles have a greater ____ of contraction. Percentage; longer; range
The strength of contraction depends on the total ___ ____ area of the fasciles and their relation to the ____ axis of the muscle. Cross sectional. Long.
A stronger muscle has ___ fasicles. More.
The easiest way to increase the # of fasciles without increasing the bulk of the muscle is to add the fasciles at an ____ to the line of pull. Angle.
Muscles with parallel fibers have a ____ range of contraction; but less ____. Greater; strength.
Muscles with pinnate fibers have ___ range of contraction but are ____. shorter; stronger.
Range of contraction and ____ of contraction vary ____. Strength; inversely.
___ ____ muscle fibers are the ___ but have a ____ range of contraction. Multi Pennate. Strongest. Short.
____ is the mechanical power resulting from a lever. Leverage
Leverage enters into the ____ and ____ of the movement produced by a muscle crossing a joint. Strength and range
Maximal strength/leverage and maximal range of joint movement vary ____. Inversely.
Taking a pennate biceps muscle unattached; we have strength but ____ range of movement… so sticking it on the body; we can get the range of motion back by inserting it ____ to the joint. Short. Close.
Nervous system cells have what two unique properties? Irritability and Conductivity.
Irritiability is what? A response to a stimulus with the initiation of a nervous impulse
Conducitivity is what? Transmission of the nervous impulse
There are two kinds of cells involved in the nervous system; what are they? Neurons and Glial Cells
The cells that are carrying the nervous impulse and are the structural and functional units of the nervous system are what? Neurons
Glial cells are found where? They have what kind of function and with what? CNS. Supportive function for the neurons.
The CNS consists of what parts of the body? The PNS consists of what? CNS= Brain and Spinal cord. PNS= anything outside the brain and spinal cord.
The two main parts of a neuron are what? Neuron cell body and neuron cell fibers
A group of neuron cell bodies located in the CNS is called a ____. A group of neuron cell bodies located in the PNS is called a ___. Nucleus. Ganglion.
A neuron cell fiber that conducts the nervous impulse TOWARDS the neuron cell body is the ____. Dendrite.
A neuron cell fiber that conducts the nervous impulse AWAY from the neuron cell body is called what? Axon.
An exception to the axon conductivity are ____ axons of ____ neurons. They are ____ ____ neurons of the dorsal root ganglia. Dendritic; pseudounipolar.
Afferent cell fibers carry ___ information; impulses TO the CNS. Sensory
Efferent cell fibers carry ____ information; impulses _____ from the CNS. Motor; AWAY
A ____ is a group of neuron fibers in the PNS. Nerve.
A ____ is a group of neuron fibers in the CNS. Tract.
What are the four main functions of the nervous system? Sensation of environmental changes; motor functions; coordination of the activities of various body structures; and thought.
What are the four types of sensations detected by the body? Changes in basic sensations; changes in spatial orientation; changes in body function; changes in internal environment
What are the two kinds of basic sensations? Special sensations; general sensations
What are the four special sensations? Vision; hearing and equilibrium; taste (gustation); smell (olfaction)
Why are special sensations called special? Because they require a special sense organ
What are the 5 general sensations? Touch; temp; pressure; proprioception; pain
The 5 general sensations are general why? Because they are found all over the body. They are generalized.
Changes in spatial orientation are called ____. This is an awareness to changes in the ____ forces to various parts of the body. This is also knowing body position in space at any time. Proprioception. Gravitational.
The body can sense changes in body function of both ____ and musculo-skeletal origin. Visceral.
An example of visceral and musculo-skeletal sensation would be what? Stomach ache (visceral) and joint ache (musculo-skeletal origin).
Internal changes in the body could be what? Hydration; internal temp; oxygen and electrolyte levels; blood pressure
What are the ONLY two motor functions that can occur? Muscular contraction and glandular secretion
The nervous system is divided into two branches based on structure; what are they? CNS and PNS
The CNS includes what? Brain and spinal cord
The PNS includes what? 12 pairs of cranial nerves; 31 pairs of spinal nerves; autonomic nerves of ANS
The nervous system is divided into two branches based on function; what are they? VNS (voluntary nervous system) and INS (involuntary nervous system)
The VNS includes the brain; corticospinal and other spinal ____. Also the cranial and spinal nerves; except those parts in the ____. Tracts; INS.
The INS includes the ___ (involuntary areas) and certain spinal ____. It includes the sympathetic (____) of the ANS and the parasympthathetic (______) of the ANS. Brain; tracts. Thoracolumbar. Craniosacral.
The simplest # of anatomical parts required for a function in the nervous system? 4
The stimulus of a nervous segment is an _____ change. environmental
The three steps following an environmental stimulus in the simplest sequence are? sensory neuron. Motor neuron. Effector.
A neuron has an adapted region called a ____ for detecting a certain type of stimulus. It responds by ____ to start an impulse. Receptor. Depolarizing.
A motor neuron responds to the nervous impulse from another neuron and passes the impulse to the ___. Effector.
The effector are cells of muscles or glands which respond to impulse and change the activity of body to the stimulus; what potential results? Muscle contraction or glandular secretion.
Sensory fibers are ____ fibers. Afferent
Sensory fibers are found in the ____; ____; and _____ nerves. Spinal; cranial; and autonomic
Sensory nerve fibers run from the ____ and go to the CNS. Receptor
The cell bodies for sensory nerve fibers are in a ____ root/spinal _____ or cranial ____. Dorsal; ganglion. Ganglion.
Sensory fibers are classified according to type and location of ____. Receptor
What are the two kinds of sensory receptors? Somatic and visceral
The three kinds of somatic receptors are what? Teleceptors; exteroceptors; proprioceptors
Somatic receptors are located where? In the body wall
Teleceptors sense things that are ___. Distant
These are any fibers with info from ___ or hearing. Vision
These are called SSA fibers; what does this mean? Special Somatic Afferent Fibers
The exteroceptors are found in the skin and ____ tissues of the body wall. Deep
Exteroceptors carry info about what 4 things? Touch; temperature; pain; pressure
Exteroceptor fibers are called GSA fibers; what does this mean? General Somatic Afferent Fibers
Proprioceptors are found in ___ muscles (called muscle _____) and tendons; called ( ___ ____ ____). Skeletal; spindles. Golgi Tendon Apparatus.
True or false: Proprioceptors detect position and movements of body via stretch in muscles and tendons and stretch or compression in joints. TRUE
Proprioceptor fibers are called what? General Somatic Afferent
What are the two kinds of visceral receptors? Interoceptors; chemoreceptors
Interoceptors are found where? In viscera
Interoceptors deal with ___ sensations (pain caused by distention etc); also SENSES smooth muscle contraction and secretory activity of glands. Visceral
Interoceptor fiber is called what? General Visceral Afferent Fiber
Chemoreceptors are found in the ___ and ____ mucosae. Nasal and tongue
Chemoreceptors sense what two things? Smell and taste
Chemoreceptors are called what fibers? Special Visceral Afferent fibers
Created by: sdschwartz