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FIRST AID

Introduction to Health Occupations

QuestionAnswer
FIRST AID First aid is immediate care administered to a victim of an injury or illness to minimize (decrease) the effect of the injury or illness until experts can take over.
First aid technique include: 1. Remain calm because anxiety is contagious (catchy).
First aid technique include: 2. Call for help by dialing 911 on the telephone or directing another to call 911.
Information necessary when telephoning for help includes: a. Your exact location including the street name, number and nearby cross street.
Information necessary when telephoning for help includes: b. The number of people involved.
Information necessary when telephoning for help includes: c. The assistance required such as police, fire rescue, or animal control.
Information necessary when telephoning for help includes: d. Describing the situation and any actions taken.
Information necessary when telephoning for help includes: e. Your name and telephone #.
Do not hang up until: help arrives.
First aid techniques include: 3. Assessing (evaluating) the environment to determine if it is safe to approach the emergency by looking, listening and smelling.
You should look, listen, and smell for: a. Smoke.
You should look, listen, and smell for: b. Fire.
You should look, listen, and smell for: c. Gasoline.
You should look, listen, and smell for: d. Electric wires.
If the environment is dangerous, do not approach. Instead you should: call for help and wait.
First aid techniques include: 4. Determining if the victim is conscious by gently tapping on them or calling to them.
Conscious (consciousness) means: awake, alert and aware.
First aid techniques include: 5. Asking the conscious victim for their consent which means permission.
If the victim is under age 18, ask the child's parent(s): for consent (permission).
If there is no one authorized to consent, permission is implied which means: allowed.
First aid techniques include: 6. Never moving a victim unless there is:
First aid techniques include: a. A dangerous environment which means surroundings.
First aid techniques include: b. The need for CPR which stands for cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
First aid techniques include: 7. Moving a victim while keeping their head, neck and back immobilized.
Immobilized (immobilization) means: no movement.
A supine victim that starts to vomit should be turned on their side without bending their vertebrae called: logrolling.
Supine means: lying on their back.
Vertebrae are aka: the spinal column (back bones).
First aid techniques include: 8. Assessing (evaluating) ABC which stands for airway, breathing and circulation.
The airway is assessed by: listening to the breath sounds.
Breathing is assessed by: watching the chest rise and fall.
Circulation is assessed by: a. Palpating (feeling) body temperature.
Circulation is assessed by: b. Palpating (feeling) their pulse in bpm which stands for beats per minute.
Circulation is assessed by c. Observing (looking) at the color of the victim's lips and toes and fingers.
Airway and breathing are assessed by: Listening to the breath sounds.
Airway and breathing are assessed by: Observing (looking) at the chest rise and fall.
First aid techniques include: 9. Asking the conscious (awake and aware) victim the following questions:
First aid techniques include: a. Do you have any allergies?
First aid techniques include: b. Do you ake any medications?
First aid techniques include: c. Do you have any illnesses?
First aid techniques include: d. How are you feeling now?
First aid techniques include: 10. Determining if the victim is wearing a medial alert bracelet or medical alert necklace.
First aid techniques include: 11. Giving the victim truthful reassurance such as "Help is on the way" and "I will stay with you".
First aid techniques include: 12. Not administering (giving) the victim anything to eat or drink unless the emergency is caused by heat cramps or heat exhaustion or if a diabetic victim asks for sugar.
If the patient complains of polydipsia (excessive thirst) use a wet cloth to: moisten the lips.
First aid techniques include: 13. Keeping the victim warm without overheating.
The warmth of the victim can be assessed (evaluated) by; palpation which means feeling.
First aid techniques include: 14. Not verbalizing a diagnosis or discussing the victim's condition with observers at the scene.
BLEEDING EMERGENCIES: Any injury is called a: wound.
A break in the skin is called an: open wound (injury).
Damage to underlying tissue without a break in the skin is called a: closed wound (injury)
Arterial bleeding usually: spurts.
Arterial bleeding causes: hemorrhagia which means rapid flow of blood.
Arterial bleeding is life threatening and must be: controlled quickly.
Venous bleeding is: slower and oozes.
Venous bleeding is more common and: easier to control.
Before attempting hemostasis; don examination (exam) gloves.
Hemostasis means: stop or control bleeding.
METHODS TO CONTROL BLEEDING: 1. Direct pressure.
METHODS TO CONTROL BLEEDING: 2. Elevation.
METHODS TO CONTROL BLEEDING: 3. Pressure bandage.
METHODS TO CONTROL BLEEDING: 4. Pressure points.
DIRECT PRESSURE: Direct pressure means: pushing against a bleeding wound.
Protective material to cover a wound (injury) is called a: dressing.
Dressing material can include: prepackaged sterile gauze sponges or clean towels.
If blood soaks through a dressing you should: apply another dressing on top.
A dressing is: protective material to cover a wound.
Do not remove applied dressings because you can disturb formed: thrombi aka clots.
Direct pressure will: stop or control most bleeding called hemostasis.
ELEVATION Elevation means: raising a bleeding extremity (limb) above the level of the heart.
Elevation slows bleeding because of an: invisible force called gravity.
Direct pressure and elevation should be used: together.
Direct pressure means: pushing against a bleeding wound.
To prevent additional injury, do not elevate a suspected extremity (limb) fracture which stands for: fracture aka a broken bone.
PRESSURE BANDAGE: A bandage is material to secure (hold) a: dressing in place.
A dressing is a protective material to cover: a wound (injury)
A pressure bandage means placing an additional dressing on top of the existing dressing and securing (holding) with a long bandage strip (roll) wrapped around and around the dressing called a: roller bandage.
A pressure bandage can be secured by tying the ends of the roller bandage or applying (placing): tape.
Secured means: held.
A bandage is material to secure (hold) a: dressing in place.
Items that can be used to secure a pressure bandage include: 1. A shirt with sleeves.
Items that can be used to secure a pressure bandage include: 2. Socks.
Items that can be used to secure a pressure bandage include: 3. A bra.
Items that can be used to secure a pressure bandage include: 4. Shoe laces.
Items that can be used to secure a pressure bandage include: 5. A belt
After application of a pressure bandage on an extremity (limb), you should assess the blood flow below the pressure bandage called: distal circulation.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of impaired (decreased) circulation include: 1. Pallor which means pale skin color.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of impaired (decreased) circulation include: 2. Cyanosis which means blue skin color.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of impaired (decreased) circulation include: 3. Pulse that is absent which means missing.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of impaired (decreased) circulation include: 4. Pulse that is thready (feeble) which means weak.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of impaired (decreased) circulation include: 5. Paresthesia which means numbness and /or tingling.
If you cannot palpate (feel) the distal pulses or if discoloration occurs: slowly loosen the pressure bandage.
PRESSURE POINTS: Pressure point means (extremity) hemostasis by applying firm direct pressure on the arteries above the: wound.
Hemostasis means: stop or control bleeding.
Pressure points include: 1. Arteries located at the antecubital spaces called brachial arteries.
Pressure points include: 2. Arteries located at the medial aspect (part) of the superior (upper) thighs called femoral arteries.
Pressure points include: 3. Arteries located posterior to (behind) the patellae called popliteal arteries.
Pressure points are used when direct pressure and elevation and pressure bandage were: ineffective.
Direct pressure and elevation and pressure bandage should be continued while applying firm direct pressure to a: pressure point.
A constricting hemostasis device placed around an extremity (limb) between a bleeding wound and the heart is called a: tourniquet.
Use a tourniquet for hemostasis only as a last resort, if bleeding cannot be stopped and the situation is: life threatening.
Items used as tourniquets include a: 1. Sphygmomanometer (BP) cuff.
Items used as tourniquets include a: 2. Roller bandage.
Items used as tourniquets include a: 3. Rope.
A tourniquet is a: constricting hemostatic device
SHOCK: Shock is a medical emergency resulting from any condition that causes deficient: blood volume (amount) and/or blood flow.
Types of shock include: 1. Shock caused by a deficient blood volume (amount) called hypovolemic shock.
Types of shock include: 2. Hypovolemic shock can be caused by a rapid flow (loss of) blood called hemorrhage.
Hypovolemic shock can be caused by dehydration from: a. Chronic (persistent) N+V which stands for nausea and vomiting.
Hypovolemic shock can be caused by dehydration from: b. Ten (10) or more loose watery stools in 24 hours called severe diarrhea.
Hypovolemic shock can be caused by dehydration from: c. Diaphoresis which means profuse (excessive) sweating.
Hypovolemic shock can be caused by dehydration from: d. Third degree burns aka full thickness burns.
Types of shock include: 2. Shock caused by damage to the central nervous system (CNS) causing vasodilation and extreme hypotension (low blood pressure) called neurogenic shock.
The CNS consists of (contains) the brain and spinal cord.
Neurogenic shock can be caused by: a. TBI which stands for traumatic brain injury.
Neurogenic shock can be caused by: b. SCI which stands for spinal cord injury.
Types of shock include: 3. Shock caused by a life threatening allergic response called anaphylactic shock.
Types of shock include: 4. Shock caused by extensive (excessive) myocardial damage called cardiogenic shock.
The myocardium is the: muscle layer of the heart.
Types of shock include: 5. Shock caused by sepsis resulting in extreme hypotension (low blood pressure) called septic shock.
Sepsis means: life threatening infection.
Signs and symptoms of shock include: 1. General weakness an disorientation which means confusion.
Signs and symptoms of shock include: 2. Pallor which means paleness.
Signs and symptoms of shock include: 3. Anxiety which means nervousness.
Signs and symptoms of shock include: 4. Tactile coolness which means cool to the touch.
Signs and symptoms of shock include: 5. Blue skin called cyanosis.
Cyanosis is commonly seen first in the: fingers and/or toes and/or lips.
Signs and symptoms of shock include: 6. Polydipsia which means excessive thirst.
Signs and symptoms of shock include: 7. Diaphoresis which means profuse (excessive) sweatiness.
Signs and symptoms of shock include: 8. Tachycardia which means fast (rapid) pulse (heart)
Signs and symptoms of shock include: 9. A weak pulse called thready or feeble.
Signs and symptoms of shock include: 10. Tachypnea (hyperpnea) which means fast (rapid) breathing.
Signs and symptoms of shock include: 11. Hypotension abbreviated LBP which stands for low blood pressure.
Signs and symptoms of shock include: 12. N+V which stands for nausea and vomiting.
Signs and symptoms of shock include: 13. LOC which stands for loss of consciousness.
Treatment for shock includes. 1. Assessing (evaluating) ABC which stands for: airway breathing circulation and calling 911.
Treatment for shock includes. 2. Placing the victim in a supine (lying on the back) position if there is no indication (sign) of a neck or spinal trauma (injury).
Treatment for shock includes. 3. Raising the victim's legs twelves (12) inches to provide additional blood from the legs to the heart and brain
Do not raise the victim's legs with a: head injury.
Treatment for shock includes. 4. Placing the victim in a sitting position if they have a head injury or dyspnea which means difficulty breathing.
Treatment for shock includes. 5. Keeping the victim warm without overheating.
Shock is a medical emergency resulting from any condition that causes : deficient blood volume (amount) and/or blood flow.
DRUG AND MEDICATION FIRST AID: Any nonfood chemical substance that affects (changes) the mid or body is called a drug.
A drug administered (given)for its therapeutic (beneficial) effect is called a: medicine or medication.
A drug or medication (medicine) dose (amount) large enough to cause harm to the body is abbreviated OD which stands for: overdose.
An overdose (OD) can occur (happen) suddenly when a large amount of drug or medication (medicine) is taken: one (1) at a time.
An overdose (OD) can occur (happen) gradually as a drug or medication (medicine) builds up in the body: over time.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of a drug or medication overdose (OD) include: 1. Dyspnea which means difficult ventilation (breathing).
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of a drug or medication overdose (OD) include: 2. Staggering which means unsteady gait (walking).
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of a drug or medication overdose (OD) include: 3. Mental sluggishness (listlessness) called lethargy (lethargic).
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of a drug or medication overdose (OD) include: 4. Grand mal seizures aka convulsions.
Treatment (Tx) for a drug or medication overdose (OD) includes: 1. Assessing (evaluating) ABC which stands for airway, breathing, circulation and calling 911.
Treatment (Tx) for a drug or medication overdose (OD) includes: 2. Place the victim on their side and provide treatment (Tx) for signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of shock.
Treatment (Tx) for a drug or medication overdose (OD) includes: 3. Determine (discover) the name(s) of the drug(s) or medication(s) taken, how much was taken and when.
Treatment (Tx) for a drug or medication overdose (OD) includes: 4. Give all drug or medication container(s) to emergency personnel.
Mental Health + Substance Abuse services are available at: www.hernandocares.org
POISON: Poison (toxin) is a substance capable of causing: illness or death.
Poisoning can happen to any individual, regardless of: age.
Poisoning can be caused by: 1. Swallowing a toxin (poison).
Poisoning can be caused by: 2. Inhaling a toxin (poison).
Poisoning can be caused by: 3. Injection of a toxin (poison).
Poisoning can be caused by: 4. Skin contact with a toxin (poison).
Treatment (Tx) for poisoning includes: 1. Assessing (evaluating) ABC which stands for airway, breathing, circulation and calling 911.
Treatment (Tx) for poisoning includes: 2. Determining (discovering) the name of the toxin (poison).
Treatment (Tx) for poisoning includes: 3. Contacting Poison Control.
If Poison Control directs (tells) you to induce (cause) vomiting, give the conscious (consciousness) awake, alert, aware victim: Syrup of ipecac.
Other techniques to induce (cause) vomiting include: 1. Drinking warm saline aka salt water.
Other techniques to induce (cause) vomiting include: 2. Tickling the back of the victim's throat.
Vomiting MUST NOT be induced (caused) for: 1. Victims who are unconscious which means asleep or unaware.
Vomiting MUST NOT be induced (caused) for: 2. Victims who have swallowed an acid or alkali.
Vomiting MUST NOT be induced (caused) for: 3. Victims who have burns on the lips or mouth.
Vomiting MUST NOT be induced (caused) for: 4. Victims who have swallowed petroleum products such as gasoline or diesel.
Vomiting MUST NOT be induced (caused) for: 5. Victims who are convulsing (convulsions) refers to a Sz which stands for seizure.
If poison occurs (happens) from inhalation (inspiration or breathing in) of dangerous gases, the victim must be immediately: removed from the area.
If poisoning occurs (happens) from contact with the victim's skin: 1. Remove the victim's clothing and/or jewelry containing the poison.
If poisoning occurs (happens) from contact with the victim's skin: 2. Irrigate (flush) the skin with large amounts of clean water.
POISONING BY INJECTION: If poisoning occurs from an injection by an insect bite or sting or snakebite, and an arm or leg is affected, position the arm or leg: below the level of the heart.
An embedded (driven) bee stinger should be removed immediately and the area should be: washed with soap and water.
Depending on the amount of venom injected, the brown recluse spider bite can cause tissue necrosis which means: death of the tissue.
Treatment (Tx) for a brown recluse spider bite includes: 1. Washing the injection area with soap and water.
Treatment (Tx) for a brown recluse spider bite includes: 2. Covering the injection area with a sterile dressing.
Treatment (Tx) for a brown recluse spider bite includes: 3. Seeking medical attention immediately and if possible bring a picture of the spider.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of a black widow spider bite include: 1. Anxiety which means nervousness.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of a black widow spider bite include: 2. Cephalgia which means head pain.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of a black widow spider bite include: 3. Diaphoresis which means profuse (excessive) sweatiness.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of a black widow spider bite include: 4. N + V which stands for nausea and vomiting.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of a black widow spider bite include: 5. Painful spasms which are involuntary no control) muscle contractions.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of a black widow spider bite include: 6. Hypertension (HTN) abbreviated HBP which stands for high blood pressure.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of a black widow spider bite include: 7. Dyspnea which means difficulty breathing.
Life threatening reactions to the black widow spider venom are generally seen only in: small children and the elderly.
Medical attention is required if the victim of a black widow spider bite has more than: minor pain.
Treatment (Tx) for a snakebite includes: 1. Positioning the extremity lower than the heart.
Treatment (Tx) for a snakebite includes: 2. Washing the injection area with soap and water.
Treatment (Tx) for a snakebite includes: 3. Covering the injection area with a sterile dressing.
Treatment (Tx) for a snakebite includes: 4. Seeking medical attention immediately and if possible bring a picture of the snake.
Treatment (Tx) for a snakebite DOES NOT include: 1. Cutting a snakebite wound.
Treatment (Tx) for a snakebite DOES NOT include: 2. Sucking out the venom.
Treatment (Tx) for a snakebite DOES NOT include: 3. Applying ice to the snakebite wound.
Treatment (Tx) for a snakebite DOES NOT include: 4. Applying a tourniquet.
An exaggerated allergic reaction is called: anaphylaxis.
Life threatening anaphylaxis is called: anaphylactic shock.
Anaphylactic shock requires: immediate medical attention.
Signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis include: 1. Generalized (affecting much or all) pain and pruritus which means itching.
Signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis include: 2. Patchy erythematous (red) and edematous (swollen) skin rash called urticaria aka hives.
Urticaria (hives) are usually raised called: welts or wheals.
Signs and symptoms of anaphylactic shock include:
Signs and symptoms of anaphylactic shock include: 2. Dysphonia which means difficulty making vocal sounds.
Signs and symptoms of anaphylactic shock include: 3. Dysphagia which means difficulty swallowing.
Signs and symptoms of anaphylactic shock include: 4. Dyspnea which means difficulty breathing.
Anaphylactic shock means: life threatening anaphylaxis (exaggerated allergic reaction).
Signs and symptoms of anaphylactic shock include: 5. Rhonchi which means wheezing.
Signs and symptoms of anaphylactic shock include: 6. Tachycardia which means fast (rapid) pulse (heart).
Signs and symptoms of anaphylactic shock include: 7. Vertigo which means dizziness.
Signs and symptoms of anaphylactic shock include: 8. LOC which stands for loss of consciousness.
Treatment (Tx) for anaphylactic shock includes subcutaneous (Sub Q) or intramuscular (IM) injections of: adrenaline aka epinephrine (EpiPen)
BURNS: A burn is a: thermal wound (injury) caused by heat.
Burns (thermal wounds) can be caused by: 1. Combustion aka fire.
Burns (thermal wounds) can be caused by: 2. Caustic compounds which means chemicals that burn.
Burns (thermal wounds) can be caused by: 3. High energy waves or rays called radiation such as ultraviolet (UV) or microwaves or X-rays.
Burns (thermal wounds) can be caused by: 4. Electrical current (flow) called electricity.
TYPES OF BURNS: Types of burns (thermal wounds) include: 1. A first degree burn aka a superficial burn.
A first -degree (superficial) burn causes damage to: the epidermis which is the 1st (outer) layer of skin.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of a first degree (superficial) burn include: a. A hurting discomfort called pain.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of a first degree (superficial) burn include: b. Erythema which means red skin.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of a first degree (superficial) burn include: c. Edema which means swelling.
Treatment (Tx) for a first-degree (superficial) burn includes: a. Irrigating (flushing) the burn with large amounts of clean cool water.
Burns should not be cooled with: ice.
Treatment (Tx) for a first-degree (superficial) burn includes: b. Raising a burned limb above the level of the heart called elevation.
Treatment (Tx) for a first-degree (superficial) burn includes: c. Application (placement) of a topical anesthetic which means no feeling or nervous sensation.
Treatment (Tx) for a first-degree (superficial) burn includes: d. Application (placement) of a dry sterile dressing.
Professional medical treatment (Tx) for a first-degree (superficial) burn is: usually not needed.
Types of burns include: 2. Second-degree burns aka partial thickness burns.
A second-degree (partial thickness) burn causes: damage to the epidermis and dermis which are the 1st and 2nd skin layers.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of a second-degree (partial thickness) burn include: a. A hurting discomfort called pain.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of a second-degree (partial thickness) burn include: b. Erythema which means red skin.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of a second-degree (partial thickness) burn include: c. Edema which means swelling.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of a second-degree (partial thickness) burn include: d. Vesicle(s) which are blister(s).
Treatment (Tx) for a second-degree (partial thickness) burn is the same as a: first-degree (superficial) burn.
Breaking the vesicles (blisters) is inadvisable (unwise) due to: increased chance of infection.
Types of burns include: 3. Third-degree burns aka full thickness burns.
A third-degree (full thickness) burn: causes damage to the epidermis, dermis and hypodermis which are the 1st, 2nd + 3rd skin layers.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of a third-degree (full thickness) burn includes: a. Pareshesis which means numbness and tingling.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of a third-degree (full thickness) burn includes: b. Edema which means swelling.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of a third-degree (full thickness) burn includes skin colors that appear: white and/or yellow and/or brown and/or purple and/or black.
Treatment (Tx) for a third-degree (full thickness) burn includes: a. Removing the heat source.
Treatment (Tx) for a third-degree (full thickness) burn includes: b. Cooling the burn with large amounts of clean cool water.
Treatment (Tx) for a third-degree (full thickness) burn includes: c. Application (placement) of a dry sterile dressing or clean towel.
Treatment (Tx) for a third-degree (full thickness) burn includes: d. Observing for and treating shock.
Treatment (Tx) for a third-degree (full thickness) burn includes: e. Preventing infection.
A third-degree (full thickness) burn requires: immediate medical attention.
If the feet are burned: do not allow the victim to walk.
Do NOT attempt to remove clothing that is: attached to the burn.
Do NOT apply any of the following to a burn: a. Cotton
Do NOT apply any of the following to a burn: b. Tissues.
Do NOT apply any of the following to a burn: c. Powders.
Do NOT apply any of the following to a burn: d. Oils.
Do NOT apply any of the following to a burn: e. Grease.
Do NOT apply any of the following to a burn: f. Butter.
HEAT CRAMPS: Heat cramps refer to myalgia (muscle pain) and spasms (involuntary muscle contractions) resulting from an excessive loss of body water and electrolytes (salts) through: perspiration aka sweat (sweating).
Treatment (Tx) for heat cramps include: 1. Applying firm pressure to the cramped muscles.
Treatment (Tx) for heat cramps include: 2. Resting in a cool place.
Treatment (Tx) for heat cramps include: 3. Drinking sips of cool water or sports drink.
To reduce the incidence (occurrence) of N+V (nausea and vomiting), fluid intake should not exceed: four (4) ounces (oz.) every fifteen (15) minutes
HEAT EXHAUSTION: Heat exhaustion is caused by excessive loss of body water and electrolytes (salts) through: perspiration aka sweat (sweating).
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of heat exhaustion include: 1. Pallor or paleness.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of heat exhaustion include: 2. Profuse (excessive) sweatiness called diaphoresis.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of heat exhaustion include: 3. A loss of energy called fatigue.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of heat exhaustion include: 4. Cephalgia which means head pain.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of heat exhaustion include: 5. Involuntary muscle contractions called muscle spasm aka muscle cramps.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of heat exhaustion include: 6. N+V which stands fro nausea and vomiting.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of heat exhaustion include: 7. Vertigo which means dizziness.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of heat exhaustion include: 8. Syncope (syncopal episode) which means fainting.
Treatment (Tx) for heat exhaustion includes: 1. Resting in a cool place.
Treatment (Tx) for heat exhaustion includes: 2. Applying (placing) cool wet cloths to the body.
Treatment (Tx) for heat exhaustion includes: 3. Raising the victim's legs twelve (12) inches.
Treatment (Tx) for heat exhaustion includes: 4. Drinking sips of cool water or sport's drink if the victim is conscious (awake, alert and aware).
Medical attention for heat exhaustion is required if the victim exhibits (shows) signs (Sx) and/or symptoms (SX) of: shock.
Shock is a medical emergency resulting from any condition that causes deficient: blood volume and/or blood flow.
HEAT STROKE: Heat stroke is a medical emergency caused by a body temperature: greater than (>) 105.0 F.
Signs and symptoms of heat stroke include: 1. Erythematous skin which means red.
Signs and symptoms of heat stroke include: 2. The skin feels hot and dry.
Signs and symptoms of heat stroke include: 3. Tachycardia which means fast (rapid) pulse (heart)
Signs and symptoms of heat stroke include: 4. LOC which stands for loss of consciousness.
Treatment (Tx) for heat stroke includes: 1. Application (placement) of cool wet cloth to body.
Treatment (Tx) for heat stroke includes: 2. Seeking medical attention immediately.
WOUND CARE: Wound means: injury.
A break in the skin is called an: open wound.
Treatment (Tx) for an open wound includes: 1. Washing your hands properly.
Treatment (Tx) for an open wound includes: 2. Donning (putting on) examination (exam) gloves.
Treatment (Tx) for an open wound includes: 3. Hemostasis which means stop or control bleeding.
Treatment (Tx) for an open wound includes: 4. Cleaning the area immediately adjacent (next) to the open wound with soap and water or an antiseptic.
Treatment (Tx) for an open wound includes: 5. Application (placement) of an antibiotic ointment to the open wound.
Treatment (Tx) for an open wound includes: 6. Covering the open wound with a sterile dressing.
Treatment (Tx) for an open wound includes: 7. Securing (holding) the dressing with a long bandage strip (roll) wrapped around and around the dressing called a roller bandage.
BONE AND JOINT INJURIES: Tissue that binds bone to bone is called: ligament(s).
Wound (injury) to a ligament(s) is called: sprain.
Treatment (Tx) for a sprain includes RICE which stands for: rest, ice, compression and elevation.
Displacement of a bone from its joint is called a: dislocation.
A broken bone is abbreviated FX which stands for: fracture.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of a fracture (FX) or dislocation include: 1. A hurting discomfort called pain.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of a fracture (FX) or dislocation include: 2. Loss, limited, or abnormal movement (motion).
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of a fracture (FX) or dislocation include: 3. Edema which means swelling.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of a fracture (FX) or dislocation include: 4. A misshapen limb called a deformity.
Signs (Sx) and symptoms (SX) of a fracture (FX) or dislocation include: 5. A change in skin color called discoloration.
Protrusion (projection) of a bone through the skin is called a: compound fracture (FX) or open fracture (FX).
Treatment (Tx) for a fracture (FX) or dislocation includes: 1. Observing for and treating shock.
Treatment (Tx) for a fracture (FX) or dislocation includes: 2. Immobilizing (preventing movement) the affected limb with a sling or splint.
Treatment (Tx) for a fracture (FX) or dislocation includes: 3. Seeking medical attention immediately.
The only way to R/O (rule out) a fracture (FX) or dislocation is to perform an: X-ray.
FOREIGN BODY IN AN EYE: Treatment (Tx) for a foreign body (FB) in an eye includes: 1. Preventing the victim from rubbing the eye.
Treatment (Tx) for a foreign body (FB) in an eye includes: 2. Washing your hands properly and pulling the victim's upper eye lid over the lower eye lid.
Treatment (Tx) for a foreign body (FB) in an eye includes: 3. Irrigating (flushing) the ye with clean water.
If a foreign body (FB) is embedded (driven) in an eye: seek medical attention immediately.
If a foreign body (FB) is protruding (projecting) from the eye: 1. Make no attempt to remove the foreign body (FB).
If a foreign body (FB) is protruding (projecting) from the eye: 2. Support the foreign body (FB) by loosely applying dressings.
If a foreign body (FB) is protruding (projecting) from the eye: 3. Seek medical attention immediately.
Apply (place) dressings to both eyes to prevent eye movements that are : uncontrollable called involuntary.
EPISTAXIS: Epistaxis means: nosebleed.
Treatment (Tx) for epistaxis (nosebleed) includes: 1. Keeping the victim quiet and calm.
Treatment (Tx) for epistaxis (nosebleed) includes: 2. Placing the victim in a sitting position with the head leaning slightly forward.
Treatment (Tx) for epistaxis (nosebleed) includes: 3. Applying (placing) pressure by gently squeezing the nostrils together.
Treatment (Tx) for epistaxis (nosebleed) includes: 4. Applying (placing) a cold compress (pad) to the bridge of the nose.
If the epistaxis (nosebleed) continues, insert a small piece of gauze in the nostril and gently squeeze the: nostrils together. Do not insert cotton.
If the epistaxis (nosebleed) does not stop or a FX is suspected, seek: medical attention.
SEIZURES: A seizure characterized (described) by body stiffening and violent jerking, tongue biting, LOC, dyspnea and incontinence is called a: grand mal seizure or convulsion.
LOC stands for: loss of consciousness.
Dyspnea means: difficulty breathing.
Incontinence means: loss of bladder control and/or loss of bowel control.
A seizure characterized(described) by brief episodes of a change in the level of consciousness (LOC) is called a: petit mal seizure or absence seizure.
Treatment (Tx) for a grand mal seizure (convulsion) includes: 1. Assisting the victim to a lying on their back position called supine.
Treatment (Tx) for a grand mal seizure (convulsion) includes: 2. Not holding the victim down.
Treatment (Tx) for a grand mal seizure (convulsion) includes: 3. Assessing (evaluating) ABC which stands for airway, breathing and circulation and calling 911.
Treatment (Tx) for a grand mal seizure (convulsion) includes: 4. Not inserting anything in the victim's mouth.
Treatment (Tx) for a grand mal seizure (convulsion) includes: 5. Clearing obstacles such as tables, chairs, etc. to prevent injury (wounds) during the seizure.
PYREXIA: Pyrexia (fever aka febrile) control should begin at: 101 .0 degree F.
Treatment (Tx) for pyrexia (fever) includes: 1. Disrobing the victim which means remove clothing.
Treatment (Tx) for pyrexia (fever) includes: 2. Pushing (encouraging) the intake of clear cool liquids such as chilled water, chilled sport drinks, popsicles or Jello.
Treatment (Tx) for pyrexia (fever) includes: 3. Administering (giving) antipyretic medications such as Tylenol (acetaminophen) or Motrin (ibuprofen).
Tylenol can be administered (given): rectally with the use of a supp (suppository).
Tylenol is aka: acetaminophen.
Do NOT administer (give) ASA to: children due to the risk of an encephalopathy called Reye's syndrome.
ASA stands for: acetylsalicylic acid.
Encephalopathy means: disease condition of the brain.
Treatment (Tx) for pyrexia (fever) includes: 4. Tepid sponge bathing which means a sponge bath or submersion of the febrile (pyrexic) victim in water that is slightly cooler than the victim.
When the water temperature becomes equivalent (equal) to the victim's body temperature, use: slightly cooler water.
Treatment (Tx) for pyrexia (fever) includes: 5. Repeating tepid sponge bathing until the fever is reduced (breaks).
Treatment (Tx) for pyrexia (fever) includes: 6. Repeating the pyrexia treatment (Tx) if the pyrexia returns.
Isopropyl alcohol sponge baths are contraindicated (inadvisable/unwise) because: the alcohol will cool the skin but does not reduce the core temperature.
Isopropyl alcohol is aka: rubbing alcohol.
Created by: bterrelonge