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LEGAL + ETHICAL

Introduction to Health Occupations

QuestionAnswer
CRIMINAL LAW: One who practices law is called an attorney aka a: lawyer.
A reference (information source) to a law is called a: citation (cited).
A law is a binding(required) legal rule enforced (applied) by the: police and the state's prosecuting attorny.
The state's (US citizens) prosecuting (accusing) attorney is abbreviated DA which stands for: district attorney.
A legal wrongdoing is called: crime or malfeasance.
A lawful act in an improper way is called: malfeasance.
Laws regarding crimes against the state (US citizens) punishable by a fine and/or incarceration (imprisonment) and/or death is called: criminal law.
Crime (criminal) means: legal wrongdoing (malfeasance)
In criminal law a district attorney (DA) is required to present (show) convincing ( believable) legal proof (truth) called the: burden of proof.
In criminal law the DA must prove guilt (responsibility or culpability) in a thorough (completely) convincing (believable) way called: beyond a reasonable doubt.
A place for the administration (management) of legal justice (fairness) is called a: court or forum.
A county or geographic area where a court (forum) administers legal justice is called a: venue.
A venue where evidence (proof) is examined and legal disputes (disagreements) are settled is called a: trial.
A court (forum) that has jurisdiction over a small geographic area is called a district court: Pasco County Courthouse.
A court (forum) that has jurisdiction (authority) over a large geographic area and handles serious crimes (malfeasance) is called a: superior court.
A crime (malfeasance) punishable by incarceration (imprisonment) for less than one (1) year and/or a fine (fee) is called a: misdememeanor.
Punishment is aka: sanction or penalty or sentence.
A crime punishable by incarceration (imprisonment) for more than one (1) year or death is called a: felony.
Crime means: legal wrongdoing (malfeasance)
Capital punishment (penalty), (sanction), (sentence) refers to the: death penalty aka execution.
Punishment designed to prevent crime is called a: deterrence (deterrent)
Examples of deterrents include: 1. Three (3) strikes.
Examples of deterrents include: 2. DUI penalties.
Examples of deterrents include: 3. 10-20-life.
Committing (doing) an intentional (deliberate), (on purpose) crime (legal wrongdoing) is called: malice.
One who begins legal action against another is called the: plaintiff.
A plaintiff's legal statement of a crime (malfeasance or legal wrongdoing) is called an: allegation or accusation.
One who defends against a plaintiff's allegation (accusation) is called the: defendant.
Plaintiff means one who: begins legal action against another.
Allegation (accusation) means a: plaintiff's legal statement of a crime (malfeasance or legal wrongdoing.
A written legal statement under oath is called a: deposition aka an affidavit.
An oath is a: legal promise to tell the truth.
A false statement under oath is called: perjury.
A group of licensed drivers chosen to determine (decide) if there is sufficient (enough) evidence (proof) for a trial is called a: grand jury.
A trial is a venue where evidence is: examined and legal disputes are settled.
A written legal allegation by a grand jury is called an: indictment.
Allegation (accusation) means: a plaintiff's legal statement of a crime (malfeasance or legal wrongdoing).
Evidence (proof) given by a witness is called: testimony (testify)
A witness is a person testifying under oath: to what they have seen or heard.
Evidence that is written or printed is called: documentation.
According to the law, if it isn't documented (written or printed): it wasn't done.
More convincing proof than your adversary (opponent) is called a: preponderance of evidence.
A court ordered command for testimony is called a: subpoena or summons.
Testimony means evidence (proof) given by a witness: to what they have seen or heard.
The first (1st) interrogation (questioning) of a witness in court is called the: direct examination.
Court is: a place for the administration of legal justice.
The second (2nd) interrogation (questioning) of a witness (person testifying under oath to what they have seen or heard) in court is called the: cross examination.
Credible means: believable.
Examples of credible witnesses include: 1. Clergy.
Examples of credible witnesses include: 2. Police.
Examples of credible witnesses include: 3. Strangers.
Strangers are credible witnesses because they have: no reason to lie.
A legal application (request) for a court ruling is calledL motion.
A motion to exclude (deny) proof is called: suppression of evidence.
Legal examination of crime scenes to gather and present evidence (proof) at trial is abbreviated CSI which stands for: crime scene investigation aka forensics.
A trial is a venue where: evidence (proof) is examined and legal disputes are settled.
A group of impartial (unbiased (fair) licensed drivers selected to evaluate evidence (proof) and render (provide) a verdict (trial jury's decision (judgement) is called a: trial jury.
Isolation (seclusion) of a trial jury to ensure (make certain) impartiality (unbiased (fair) is called a: sequester.
To make less severe because of fairness or mercy is called: mitigation (mitigating circumstances) aka extenuating circumstances (situations), (happenings).
For a defendant in a criminal trial to be judged guilty the verdict must be: unanimous (agreed by all).
To be judged innocent (not guilty (responsible or culpable) is called an: acquittal.
An acquittal in criminal law can be achieved if a defendant can show: reasonable doubt.
If a unanimous (agreed by all) verdict cannot be reached by a trial jury, the judge will declare (announce) a: mistrial or hung jury.
A trial with no trial jury where the judge renders (provides) the verdict (decision or judgement) is called a: bench trial.
A legal application (request) for a new trial is called an: appeal.
A legal decision by a judge that becomes law and applies to future cases is called a: precedent.
Breaking and entering to commit a crime is called: burglary.
Secret planning with another to commit a crime is called: conspiracy.
One who participates with another in a crime is called an: accomplice.
Deliberate deception intended to produce unlawful gain is called: fraud.
Criminal intimidation (threat) compelling (requiring) an individual to act against their will is called: coercion
An attempt or threat to inflict bodily harm is called: assault.
Illegal touching of another is called: battery.
What a person owns is called: property.
Stealing property is called: theft.
Stealing (theft of) property to convert (change) to cash is called: larceny.
Stealing property with physical injury or threat of injury is called: robbery.
A lewd (vulgar) and lascivious (obscene) sexual act is called sodomy.
Florida sodomy laws have sanctions for: public display of sexual organs and/or sexual activity with a person under 16.
Sanctions are: penalties aka sentences or punishments.
A forced sexual act is called: rape.
Those under age 18 are called: minors or juveniles.
Sexual relations with a minor (juvenile) is called: statutory rape.
Killing a human intentionally is called: murder.
Intentionally means: deliberately (on purpose)
Murder that is planned is called: premeditated.
Committing premeditated killing of a human is called: first (1st) degree murder.
Unpremeditated killing of a human is called: manslaughter.
The right to protect oneself reasonably (correctly) from acts of violence or threat of violence is called: self-defense.
The most reasonable (correct) action regarding self defense is to: call the police and/or escape if possible.
Restoring (returning) to normal life is called: rehabilitation or reformation.
CIVIL LAW: Civil law refers to legal disputes between: individuals.
Disputes are: disagreements
Civil law refers to litigation: aka a lawsuit.
Civil litigation (lawsuit) is also called a: tort.
A person guilty of committing a tort is called a: tortfeasor.
Something that depends upon uncertain future events is called a: contingency (contingent)
Attorneys paid by contingency feel are called: tort lawyers or personal injury lawyers.
Civil law refers to damages which means: monetary compensation.
Monetary compensation for a loss is called: compensatory damages.
Monetary compensation as a punishment for the offender is called: punitive damages.
A legal wrongdoing is called a: crime or malfeasance.
A legal act in an improper way is called: misfeasance.
Failure to act when legally required is called: nonfeasance.
Violation of civil law is called a: breach or infraction
A legal obligation is called a: contract.
Violation of a legal obligation is called: breach of contract.
An understanding by those involved in a legal contract is called: mutual assent.
A court ordered payment of a portion of each paycheck directly to creditors until a debt is resolved (settled) is called: garnishment.
Creditors are those who are: owed.
Debt means: money, goods or services owed.
Failure to take reasonable (correct) precautions (safeguards) to protect others from risk or harm is called: negligence.
Negligence (failure to take reasonable (correct) precautions (safeguards) to protect others from risk or harm that is obvious is called: gross negligence.
Examples of gross negligence include: a. Amputating the wrong leg.
Examples of gross negligence include: b. Leaving an instrument, sponge, needle, etc. inside a client after a surgical procedure.
Examples of gross negligence include: c. Administering (giving) a medication to the wrong client.
Loss of life caused by negligence is called: wrongful death.
A percentage (amount) of negligence assigned (given) to those involved is called: comparative negligence.
The plaintiff's (one who begins legal action against another) negligence is called: contributory negligence.
Financial protection for negligence is called: liability (responsibility) insurance.
A law setting the maximum amount of time a person has to initiate (start) litigation (lawsuit) is called the: statute of limitations.
The statute (law) of limitations for filing (legal application or request) medical malpractice lawsuit in Florida ranges from: two (2) to four (4) years.
Misconduct by a HCP (Health Care Provider) is called: medical malpractice (wrongdoing or malfeasance).
Any care resulting in unnecessary harm, pain, or anguish (suffering) is called: abuse.
Unlawful restraint (to limit freedom) or confinement of one person by another is called: false imprisonment.
Damaging a reputation by speaking a lie is called: slander.
Damaging a reputation (status or rank or character) by writing a lie is called: libel
Damaging a reputation (status or rank) with slander and/o libel is called: defamation of character.
A successful medical malpractice litigation (lawsuit) requires evidence of: 1. A professional relationship between the HCP and the client.
A successful medical malpractice litigation (lawsuit) requires evidence of: 2. A failure to provide the correct level of performance called the standard of care.
A successful medical malpractice litigation (lawsuit) requires evidence of: 3. The failure to provide the standard of care (level of performance) causes an injury.
Civil litigation that have little or no merit (worthiness) are called: frivolous lawsuits or nuisance suits.
A frivolous lawsuit refers to civil litigation that has: little or no merit (worthiness) aka nuisance suits.
AGENT An agent is a person legally delegated (authorized or allowed) to: act for another.
An agent legally delegated (authorized) to care for a mentally incompetent (incapacitated) person is called a: guardian aka a conservator (conservatorship).
Mental incompetence (incapacity) means: lacking the cognitive abilities to understand ordinary concerns.
An agent legally delegated (authorized, allowed) to care for a mentally incompetent (incapacitated) person or care for property is called a: custodian.
An agent legally delegated (authorized) to represent the rights of a mentally incompetent (incapacitated) person is called a: guardian ad litem.
PRIVACY Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) refers to rules regarding: confidential (privileged or private) medical information.
HIPAA rights include how the client can inspect (examine) their health information and obtain (get) a replica of which means: copy.
HIPAA stands for: Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act.
HIPAA (refers to rules regarding confidential (privileged and private) medical information) rights include how the client can request health information disclosure which means: release
HIPAA rights include how the client can request health information amendments which means: additions or changes.
HIPAA rights include how the client can request communication about their health information at alternative sites which means: different locations.
HIPAA rights include how the client can restrict disclosure (release) of their health information which gives them: control.
HIPAA rights include how the client can request authorization to disclose (release) their health information which means: giving permission.
Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) rights include how the client can complain about a privacy right violation which means: wrongdoing aka malfeasance or breach or crime.
When there is any doubt regarding whether you should disclose (release) medical information, you should: not disclose (release) the information.
This includes disclosing (releasing) that an individual is a: client.
Exposing (displaying) a client or divulging (revealing/telling) confidential (private and privileged) information is called: invasion of privacy.
Confidential (privileged or private) communication is legally required by: 1. Attorney aka lawyers.
Confidential (privileged or private) communication is legally required by: 2. Those ordained (appointed) for religious duties called clergy.
Confidential (privileged or private) communication is legally required by: 3. HCP which stands for health care provider.
Sanctions (penalties or punishment) for wrongfully disclosing (revealing or telling) private health information include: a. incarceration (imprisonment) up to one (1 year)
Sanctions (penalties/sentences/punishments) for wrongfully disclosing private health information include: b. A fine (fee) of $50,000.
Sanctions (penalties/sentences/punishments) for wrongfully disclosing private health information include: c. Civil litigation (lawsuit) by those whose information you disclosed (revealed or told).
Confidential (privileged or private) information is to be disregarded (ignored) and the police notified when a client is a: 1. DTS or DTO which stands for danger to self or danger to others.
Confidential (privileged or private) information is to be disregarded (ignored) and the police notified when a client has: 2. Injuries caused by violence.
Confidential (privileged or private) information is to be disregarded (ignored) and the police notified when a client is involved in a: 3. Legal wrongdoing called a crime or malfeasance.
On legal documents the first (1st) party is the: client.
The second (2nd) party is the: healthcare provider.
The third (3rd) party: can be anyone designated (authorized) but is usually an insurance company.
To disclose (release) medical information to a third (3rd) party, the adult client or their agent (legal representative) must: a. Provide valid (legally acceptable) identification such as a driver's license or identification (ID) card.
To disclose (release) medical information to a third (3rd) party, the adult client or their agent (legal representative) must: b. Sign an authorization called a release of medical information waiver.
An agent is a person legally delegated to: act for another.
Waiver means to surrender (give up) a: right, privilege or claim.
A legal command for a medical record is called a: subpoena duces tecum.
CONSENT: Consent means: permission (allow).
Consent (permission) obtained (gotten) after the client understands the situation completely is called: informed consent aka expressed consent.
Informed consent (expressed contract) requires all information regarding: a. Treatment (Tx)
Informed consent (expressed contract) requires all information regarding: b. Why treatment (Tx) is necessary.
Informed consent (expressed contract) requires all information regarding: c. Risks involved.
Informed consent (expressed contract) requires all information regarding: d. Available alternatives (substitutes).
Informed consent (expressed contract) requires all information regarding: e. Risks of alternatives (substitutes)
Informed consent (expressed contract) requires all information regarding: f. Risks if treatment (Tx) is refused.
Informed consent (expressed contract) requires evaluation (assessment) of the: 1. Client's level of education.
Informed consent (expressed contract) is: permission obtained (gotten) after the client understands the situation completely.
Informed consent (expressed contract) requires evaluation (assessment) of the: 2. Client's primary language.
One who does not have training in a specific profession is called a: layperson.
Informed consent (expressed contract) requires evaluation (assessment) of the: 3. Client's mental processes of comprehension (understanding), judgement (reasoning) and memory called cognitive abilities.
Lacking the cognitive abilities to understand ordinary concerns is called: mental incompetence or mental incapacity or legal disability.
Cognitive abilities are the mental processes of: comprehension (understanding), judgement (reasoning), and memory.
Reasons for an individual to be judged mentally incompetent include: 1. Psychopathy aka mental illness.
Reasons for an individual to be judged mentally incompetent include: 2. Deteriorating (worsening) cognitive abilities called dementia.
Reasons for an individual to be judged mentally incompetent include: 3. An intelligent quotient (IQ) below 75 abbreviated ID which stands for intellectual disability.
Intellectual disability (ID) is aka MR which stands for: mental retardation.
Reasons for an individual to be judged mentally incompetent include: 4. Influenced by drugs or alcohol.
Reasons for an individual to be judged mentally incompetent include: 5. Under age 18 aka a juvenile or minor.
The order of legal authority to make medical decisions for a person who is mentally incompetent (incapacitated) is: a. Spouse
The order of legal authority to make medical decisions for a person who is mentally incompetent (incapacitated) is: b. Oldest adult child.
The order of legal authority to make medical decisions for a person who is mentally incompetent (incapacitated) is: c. Parents.
The order of legal authority to make medical decisions for a person who is mentally incompetent (incapacitated) is: d. Oldest adult sibling.
Permission evident (obvious) by conduct (behavior) is called: implied consent or implied contract.
Implied consent (implied contract) includes: a. Holding out (extending) an arm for phlebotomy aka venipuncture.
Implied consent (implied contract) includes: b. Entering an ED which stands for emergency department.
MINORS: Those under age 18 are called: minors or juveniles.
Minors (juveniles) cannot be legally treated without their parent's or guardian's: consent aka permission.
Minors (juveniles) can be legally treated without their parent's or guardian's consent (permission) when: 1. A minor (juvenile) has a medical condition requiring immediate treatment (Tx) called an emergency.
A prewritten consent (permission) from a parent or guardian for medical treatment of their (juvenile) requires signature verification (proof) by a: notary public.
Minors (juveniles) can be legally treated without their parent's or guardian's consent (permission) when: 2. They request Tx (treatment or therapy) for a STD which stands for sexually transmitted disease.
Minors (juveniles) can be legally treated without their parent's or guardian's consent (permission) when: 3. They request treatment for drug and/or alcohol dependence called substance abuse (addiction).
Minors (juveniles) can be legally treated without their parent's or guardian's consent (permission/allow) when: 4. They request a method to prevent pregnancy called contraceptive.
Minors (juveniles) can be legally treated without their parent's or guardian's consent (permission) when: 5. They request termination of a pregnancy called abortion.
Minors (under age 18) are aka: juveniles.
Florida law requires parental or guardian notification (informing) if a minor (juvenile) requests an: abortion.
Parental or guardian notification can be waived by a judge if the minor (juvenile) is a victim of: abuse.
A juvenile who possesses the cognitive abilities to make an informed medical decision is called a: mature minor.
A juvenile who by marriage or financial independence is legally declared an adult is called an: emancipated minor.
A juvenile (minor) is not emancipated by becoming a parent but a juvenile (minor) parent may consent (give permission) for: 1. Medical care related to a pregnancy.
A juvenile (minor) is not emancipated by becoming a parent but a juvenile (minor) parent may consent (give permission) for: 2. Medical care of the child.
A minor is not emancipated by becoming a parent but a minor parent may consent (give permission) for: 3. Court ordered payments from the father called child support.
A juvenile (minor) is not emancipated by becoming a parent but a juvenile (minor) parent may consent (give permission) for: 4. Another to assume (take) legal responsibility for their child called adoption.
PATIENT BILL OF RIGHTS: The patient Bill of Rights includes: 1. Permission obtained after the client understands the situation completely called informed consent aka expressed contract.
The patient Bill of Rights includes: 2. The administration (giving) of considerate and respectful care.
The patient Bill of Rights includes: 3. Giving the client complete information concerning: diagnosis (Dx) and treatment (Tx) and prognosis (Px).
The patient Bill of Rights includes: 4. Freedom from outside observation called privacy.
The patient Bill of Rights includes: 5. Protection of confidential medical information aka privileged or private.
The patient Bill of Rights includes: 6. Reasonable response to a request.
The patient Bill of Rights includes: 7. Giving complete information concerning affiliated facilities which means officially (legally) connected.
The patient Bill of Rights includes: 8. No experimentation without consent (permission).
The patient Bill of Rights includes: 9. Continuous service called continuity of care.
The patient Bill of Rights includes: 10. Detailed explanation of the client's bill.
The patient Bill of Rights includes: 11. Detailed explanation of hospital rules and regulations.
The patient Bill of Rights includes: 12. Refusal of treatment (Tx).
The patient Bill of Rights includes: 13. Providing documents that specify (explain) an individual's end of life wishes called an advance directive.
ADVANCE DIRECTIVES: Examples of advance directives include: 1. A physician's order written on the client's medical record to not revive the client if their heart stops abbreviated DNR which stands for do not resuscitate aka "no code".
Examples of advance directives include: 2. A document stating that a person does not want to be kept alive by artificial means (heroic measures) when there is little expectation of recovery called a living will.
Examples of advance directives include: 3. A document delegating (authorizing) another to make medical decisions for a person that is mentally incompetent (incapacitated) called a designation of a health care surrogate.
Designation of a health care surrogate is also known as a: health care power of attorney.
Designation of a health care surrogate is also known as a: durable power of attorney for health care.
Designation of a health care surrogate is also known as a: health care proxy.
Examples of advance directives include: 4. A document with instructions for the disposition (distribution) of one's property after death called a last will and testament.
A document delegating (authorizing), (allowing) a person to make legal and business decisions for another is abbreviated POA which stands for: power of attorney.
Power of attorney (POA) expires (ends) with the death of one who gave the legal authority (power) called a: grantor.
One who receives legal authority (power) is called a: grantee.
A person delegated (authorized) in a last will and testament to carryout the instructions of the will is called an: executor.
The legal process of distributing the deceased (dead) person's property and resolving all claims (requests) is called: probate.
Something not legally enforceable (able to happen) is called: invalid.
Synonyms (same meaning) for invalid include: 1. Nonbinding.
Synonyms (same meaning) for invalid include: 2. Void.
Synonyms (same meaning) for invalid include: 3. Annul.
Synonyms (same meaning) for invalid include: 4. Revoke.
Synonyms (same meaning) for invalid include: 5. Rescind.
Synonyms (same meaning) for invalid include: 6. Cancel.
Performing unnecessary medical tests and procedures to ward off (decrease) litigation (lawsuits) is called: defensive medicine.
The process of voiding (cancelling) the professional relationship between a HCP and a client is called: memorialization (memorialize)
Memorialization includes: 1. Sending a letter by certified mail.
Memorialization includes: 2. Giving a thirty (3) day notice (warning).
A client that leaves a medical facility without a physician's permission is abbreviated AMA which stands for: against medical advice.
MEDICAL ERROR PREVENTION: A method (way) to identify (recognize), evaluate (examine), and eliminate (stop) error (mistake) creators for deliver of safer client care is abbreviated RCA which stands for: root cause analysis.
A cause and effect technique (skill) associated with root cause analysis (RCA) is abbreviated DMAIC which stands for: 1. Define.
A cause and effect technique (skill) associated with root cause analysis (RCA) is abbreviated DMAIC which stands for: 2. Measure.
A cause and effect technique (skill) associated with root cause analysis (RCA) is abbreviated DMAIC which stands for: 3. Analyze.
A cause and effect technique (skill) associated with root cause analysis (RCA) is abbreviated DMAIC which stands for: 4. Improve.
A cause and effect technique (skill) associated with root cause analysis (RCA) is abbreviated DMAIC which stands for: 5. Control.
Medical error prevention includes continuous assessment (evaluation) of the client's mental processes of comprehension (understanding), judgement (reasoning), and memory called: cognitive abilities.
Medical error prevention includes verifying (proving) the following client identifiers: a. Asking their full name.
Medical error prevention includes verifying (proving) the following client identifiers: b. Asking for their date of birth (DOB).
Medical error prevention includes verifying (proving) the following client identifiers: c. Asking for their address.
Medical error prevention includes verifying (proving) the following client identifiers: d. Asking a family member to confirm (agree with) client identification.
Medical error prevention includes verifying (proving) the following client identifiers: e. Asking for a driver's license or state issued ID.
Medical error prevention includes verifying (proving) the following client identifiers: f. Comparing client name with their healthcare record number.
Medical error prevention includes asking clients about any allergies and/or adverse reactions they have had to: medications or food at the beginning of every appointment.
Medical error prevention includes asking clients to bring all their OTC (over the counter) and prescription medication bottles including supplements such as vitamins and herbs to: every appointment.
Medical error prevention includes verifying (proving) each medication name, action, use, dose, route, side effects and contraindications before administration (giving) by using a reputable (trustworthy) resource such as the USNLM which stands for: United States National Library of Medicine ( www.pdr.net)
Medical error prevention includes verifying (proving) that written prescriptions are legible (readable) and: complete.
Medical error prevention includes being aware of possible medication name confusion such as: Lamictal (antiepileptic) and Lamisil (antifungal) or Xanax (alprazolam) and Zantac (ranitidine).
Medical error prevention includes explaining medication and Tx instructions in terms the client and their family can: understand.
Medical error prevention includes following hand cleaning guidelines established by the CDC which stands for: Centers for Disease Control (www.cdc.gov).
Medical error preventions include: reporting and documenting any safety violations.
Medical error prevention includes educating client and families about: post-operative (after surgery) infection control.
Medical error prevention includes continuous assessment (evaluation) of the client's risk of falls and take: preventive measures.
Medical error prevention includes continuous assessment (evaluation) of the client's risk for decubitus ulcers aka: bedsores or pressure ulcers.
Medial error prevention includes continuous assessment (evaluation) of the client's risk for killing themselves called: suicide.
The six (6) C's for correctly entering information into a medical record are: 1. Client's words must be recorded exactly with the use of quotation marks.
The six (6) C's for correctly entering information into a medical record are: 2. Clarity by documenting the client's condition using appropriate medical language.
The six (6) C's for correctly entering information into a medical record are: 3. Completeness which means being thorough.
The six (6) C's for correctly entering information into a medical record are: 4. Conciseness which means getting to the point.
The six (6) C's for correctly entering information into a medical record are: 5. Chronological order which means arranged according to time.
The six (6) C's for correctly entering information into a medical record are: 6. Confidentiality which means privileged (private) information.
Medical information is the property of the: client.
The custodian of the medical record is the: HCP (health care provider) or the medical facility that created it.
Custodian means an agent legally delegated (authorized) to care for: property.
The custodian of the medical record must provide the client with: 1. Access to their medical information.
The custodian of the medical record must provide the client with: 2. Explanations of their medical record.
The custodian of the medical record must provide the client with: 3. Copies of the medical record.
Custodians of medical records are permitted to charge a client $1.00 for: each medical record page copied.
The only exception for client's ability to access their medical record is for: mental health information.
LIABILITY: Liability means: legal responsibility.
Legal responsibility for another is called being: vicariously liable.
Those who are vicariously liable (legally responsible for another) include: 1. A respondeat superior aka your employer.
Those who are vicariously liable (legally responsible for another) include: 2. Mothers and fathers called parents.
Those who are vicariously liable (legally responsible for another) include: 3. An agent legally delegated (authorized) (allowed) to care for a mentally incompetent (incapacitated) person called a guardian.
GOOD SAMARITAN ACT: The Good Samaritan Act is a law that allows the administration (giving) of emergency care without the threat of: litigation aka a lawsuit.
Good Samaritan Act guidelines include: 1. The situation must be an emergency.
Good Samaritan Act guidelines include: 2. The emergency care administered (given) must be free of charge.
Good Samaritan Act guidelines include: 3. The emergency care administered (given) must be in good faith which means good intentions.
Good Samaritan Act guidelines include: 4. The location of the emergency must be away from a medical facility.
Good Samaritan Act guidelines include: 5. The emergency care must be without victim objection (protest)
Good Samaritan Act guidelines include: 6. The emergency care must be the same that a reasonably appropriate (correct) person would administer under the same or similar circumstances.
Good Samaritan Act guidelines include: 7. No legal obligation (requirement) for a HCP to administer (give) help.
DRUG & MEDICATION SCHEDULES: Physical dependence or psychological dependence on a drug or medication requiring an increased dosage (amount) for desired effects and withdrawal symptoms (SX) when deprived (without) is called: addiction or abuse.
Drugs and medications having potential (capability) for addiction (abuse) are called: scheduled medications (drugs) or controlled medications (drugs).
As the number of a scheduled drug or medication decreases, the addiction (abuse) potential (capability): increases.
Scheduled medications or drugs are aka: controlled medications or drugs.
Schedule I (1) medications/drugs include: 1. Heroin
Schedule I (1) medications/drugs include: 2. Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD)
Schedule I (1) medications/drugs include: 3. Marijuana (cannabis)
Schedule I (1) medications/drugs include: 4. Ecstasy.
Schedule I (1) medications/drugs include: 5. Quaalude ( methaqualone)
Schedule I (1) medications/drugs include: 6. Peyote.
Schedule I (1) medications/drugs include: 7. Crack cocaine.
Schedule II (2) medications/drugs include: 1. Cocaine.
Schedule II (2) medications/drugs include: 2. Methamphetamine.
Schedule II (2) medications/drugs include: 3. Methadone.
Schedule II (2) medications/drugs include: 4. Dilaudid (hydromorphone)
Schedule II (2) medications/drugs include: 5. Demerol (meperidine)
Schedule II (2) medications/drugs include: 6. OxyContin (Oxyodone)
Schedule II (2) medications/drugs include: 7. Adderall (amphetamine)
Schedule II (2) medications/drugs include: 8. Ritalin (methylphenidate)
Schedule III (3) medications/drugs include: 1. Vicodin (hydrocodone)
Schedule III (3) medications/drugs include: 2. Codeine.
Schedule III (3) medications/drugs include: 3. Ketamine (anesthetic)
Schedule III (3) medications/drugs include: 4. Anabolic steroids.
Schedule III (3) medications/drugs include: 5. Testosterone.
Schedule IV (4) medications/drugs include: 1. Valium (diazepam)
Schedule IV (4) medications/drugs include: 2. Librium (chlordiazepoxide)
Schedule IV (4) medications/drugs include: 3. Ambien (zolpidem).
Schedule IV (4) medications/drugs include: 4. Xanax (alprazolam)
Schedule IV (4) medications/drugs include: 5. Ativan (lorazepam)
Schedule V (5) medications/drugs include: 1. Lomotil (diphenoxylate and atropine)
Schedule V (5) medications/drugs include: 2. Lyrica.
Schedule V (5) medications/drugs include: 3. Cough suppressants (antitussive) with codeine.
Created by: bterrelonge