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MUSCULAR SYSTEM

Fundamental of Body Structures and Functions

QuestionAnswer
Types of muscle include: 1. Skeletal muscle aka striated muscle.
Types of muscle include: 2. Smooth muscle aka visceral muscle.
Types of muscle include: 3. Cardiac muscle aka heart muscle.
The physiology (function) of muscle is: contraction and relaxation.
Muscle contraction means: generating (creating) tension (force).
Muscle relaxation means: releasing tension (force) (TEST)
Skeletal muscle is also known as striated.
A microscopic view of skeletal (striated) muscle reveals (shows) stripes called striations.
Skeletal muscles are connected to bones to provide movement called: locomotion.
Skeletal muscle is also known as striated.
A microscopic view of skeletal (striated) muscle reveals (shows) stripes (striations)
Skeletal muscles are voluntary which means you have control.
Skeletal muscle is also known as striated.
Tough flexible non-elastic fibrous tissue that connects to skeletal (striated muscles to bones are called; tendons.
Skeletal (striated) muscles are voluntary which means you have control.
Smooth Muscle: Smooth muscle is aka visceral muscle
Smooth (visceral) muscle is autonomic aka involuntary which means you have no control.
Smooth muscle is located in the: 1. Walls of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract providing wave like contractions that push digesting food along called peristalsis or peristaltic activity.
Smooth (visceral) muscle is located in the; 2. Myometrium for contractions during L+D which stands for labor and delivery.
Myometrium means muscle layer of the uterus (womb).
Smooth (visceral) muscle is located in the arteries to: 3. Increase and decrease the lumen (diameter) called vasodilation and vasoconstriction.
Smooth (visceral) muscle is located in the 4. Walls of the urinary bladder providing contractions for the evacuation (expulsion) of urine called micturition (micturate) or urination (urinate).
Cardiac muscle Cardiac muscle is found in the heart
Cardiac (heart) muscle is autonomic aka involuntary which means you have no control.
Cardiac (heart) muscle has the unique ability to contract, immediately relax and then contract again.
This allows the cardiac (heart) muscle cells to function as a pump.
Muscle contraction Muscle contraction means applying (putting) tension (force).
Constant (continuous) partial muscle contraction is called muscle tone.
To prevent fatigue, muscle cells alternate with muscle contraction to maintain posture.
Muscle contraction that shortens a muscle is called isotonic
Muscle contraction means generating (creating) tension (force).
Muscle contraction that does not shorten a muscle is called isometric.
Muscle contraction means generating (creating) tension (force).
The attachment site (location) of a muscle that does not move during contraction is called the origin.
Attachment means connection.
The attachment (connection) of a muscle that moves during contraction is called the: insertion.
Muscle names (TEST) Muscles that move a limb toward the midline of the body are called; adductors
Muscles that move a limb away from the midline are called TEST. abductors.
Muscles that bend a limb at a joint are called (TEST) flexors
A joint is where one bone meets another bone and (TEST) articulates (moves)
Muscles that extend a limb at a joint are called (TEST) extensors
Muscles that rotate a limb are called (TEST) rotators.
Muscles with two (2) origins are called biceps
Origin means attachment site (location) of a muscle that does not move during contraction.
Muscles with three (3) origins are called triceps
Muscles with four (4) origins are called quadriceps
Large muscles are called maximus
Small muscles are called minimus
Long muscles are called longus
Muscles that run at an angle are called oblique
Muscles that run across are called transversus
Muscles with a square or rectangular shape are called quadratus
Muscles can be named according to their origin and insertion such as sternocleidomastoid which refers to a sternum (origin) and clavicle (collar bone) and mastoid bone (insertion)
Muscles can be named according to their location such as frontalis
Muscles can be named according to their location such as tibialis.
Muscles can be named according to their location such as radialis
Muscles can be named according to their function such as (TEST) pronator teres and pronator quadratus. Pronation means turning a palm downwards.
Muscles can be named according to their function such as TEST supinator. Supination means turning a palm upwards
Skeletal muscles
Examples of skeletal muscles include the: 1. Bicepses brachii which flex the inferior (lower) arms.
Examples of skeletal (striated) muscles include the: 2. Tricepses brachii which extend the inferior (lower) arms.
Examples of skeletal (striated) muscles include the: 3. Sternocleidomastoids which turn (rotate) the head and/or pull the head toward the sternum (breastbone).
Examples of skeletal (striated) muscles include the: 4. Frontalis and occipitalis which raise the eyebrows and wrinkle the forehead.
Botulism toxin (poison) administered (given) to paralyze frontalis muscles for the treatment (Tx) of forehead rhytides is called: Botox. Rhytides are wrinkles.
Examples of skeletal (striated) muscles include the: 5. Zygomatici and buccinators which raise the corners of the superior (upper) oral labia (lip) and create a smile.
Examples of skeletal (striated) muscles include the: 6. Masseters and temporals which raise the inferior jaw (mandible) during mastication aka chewing.
Examples of skeletal (striated) muscles include the: 7. Levators scapulae and rhomboids and pectoralis minors and trapezius which move (shrug) the scapulae aka shoulder bones or shoulder blades.
Examples of skeletal (striated) muscles include the: 8. Pectoralis majors which flex and adduct the arms.
Adductors move a limb: toward the midline of the body.
Examples of skeletal (striated) muscles include the: 9. Latissimus dorsi which extends and adducts and rotates the arms medially (swimming).
Extensors are muscles that: extend a limb at a joint.
TEST TEST TEST Examples of skeletal (striated) muscles include the: Deltoids which abduct the arms.
Deltoids are injection sites (locations) for: intramuscular (IM) medications.
intramuscular (IM) medications. 11. Flexors carpi which flex the wrists.
Flexors are muscles that: bend a limb at the joint.
Examples of skeletal (striated) muscles include the: 12. Extensors carpi which extend the wrists.
intramuscular (IM) medications. 13. Flexor digitora which flex the fingers and toes.
Examples of skeletal (striated) muscles include the: 14. Extensor digitora which extends the fingers and toes.
Examples of skeletal (striated) muscles include the: 15. Flexor polices which flex the thumb.
Flexor polices are commonly used for: text messaging.
Examples of skeletal (striated) muscles include the: 16. Extensor polices which extend the thumbs.
Extensor polices are commonly used for hitchhiking.
Examples of skeletal (striated) muscles include the: 17. Adductor pollices which adduct the thumbs
Adductors are muscles that: move a limb toward the midline.
Examples of skeletal (striated) muscles include the:
Examples of skeletal (striated) muscles include the: 19. Opponens pollices which flex and oppose the thumbs.
Opposition is: thumb movement towards the palm.
Skeletal (striated) muscle that comprise (form) the abdominal wall include the: 1. External oblique which twist the trunk.
Skeletal (striated) muscle that comprise (form) the abdominal wall include the: 2. Internal oblique which twist the trunk.
Comprise means form
Skeletal (striated) muscle that comprise (form) the abdominal wall include the: 3. Transversus abdominises aka the "inner abs" which maintain abdominal muscle tone.
Skeletal (striated) muscle that comprise (form) the abdominal wall include the: 4. Rectus abdominises aka "washboard abs" or "six pack abs" which move the body between the ribcage and pelvis.
Skeletal (striated) muscles of ventilation (breathing) include the: 1. Diaphragm.
Skeletal (striated) muscles of ventilation (breathing) include the: 2. Internal intercostals.
Intercostal muscles are located between the ribs.
Skeletal (striated) muscles of ventilation (breathing) include the: 3. External intercostals.
Skeletal (striated) muscles that comprise (form) the buttocks include: 1. Glutei maximi aka butt cheeks which move the legs posteriorly (backwards)
Skeletal (striated) muscles that comprise (form) the buttocks include: 2. Glutei minimi which abduct the legs.
Abductors are muscles that move a limb away from the midline.
Skeletal (striated) muscles that comprise (form) the buttocks include: 3. Glutei medii which abduct the legs.
TEST TEST TEST Glutei medii muscles are injection sites for intramuscular (IM) injections
Skeletal (striated) muscles that flex the knees include the: 1. Poplitei
Arteries located in the posterior patellar (kneecap) regions are called: popliteal
Skeletal muscles that flex the knees include: 2. Graciles.
Skeletal muscles that flex the knees include: 3. Sartorii
Flexors are muscles that bend a limb at a joint.
Skeletal muscles that flex the knees include: 4. Bicepses femoris
Skeletal muscles are voluntary which means you have control.
Skeletal muscles that flex the knees include: 5. Semitendinosi
Skeletal muscles that flex the knees include: 6. Semimembranosi
Biceps femoris and semimembranosi are aka hamstrings.
Biceps femoris and semitendimosi and semimembranosi flex the knees
Skeletal muscles that extend the knees include: 1. Recti femoris
TEST TEST TEST Skeletal muscles that extend the knees include: 2. Vasti lateralis
Vasti lateralis are injection sites (locations) for intramuscular (IM) injections.
Skeletal muscles that extend the knees include: 3. Vasti medialis
Vastus (vasti) means: anterior (front) thigh(s).
Skeletal muscles that extend the knees include the: 4. Vasti intermedius.
Recti femoris and vasti lateralis and vasta medialis and vasti intermedius muscles are called the: quadriceps femoris group.
Upward foot movement is called: dorsiflexion.
Skeletal (striated) muscles that dorsiflex include the: 1. Tibiales anterior
Dorsiflexion means upward foot movement.
Skeletal (striated) muscles that dorsiflex include the: 2. Peronei tertius
Skeletal (striated) muscles that plantar flex include the: 1. Gastrocnemii aka the calf muscles.
Plantar flexion means downward movement.
Skeletal (striated) muscles that plantar flex include the: 2. Solei
Skeletal (striated) muscles that plantar flex include the: 3. Peronei longus
Skeletal (striated) muscles that plantar flex include the: 4. Plantares
Skeletal (striated) muscles that plantar flex include the: 5. Tibiales posterior.
The number of skeletal (striated) muscles in humans is: 650
Created by: bterrelonge