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SSCT Intro to A&P C5

SSCT Intro to Anatomy & Physiology Ch. 5

QuestionAnswer
Pinpoint size opening on the skin that serves as an outlet of a small duct from the eccrine sweat glands Pores
Secretion of the Subaceous glands Sebum
Small sweat glands distributed over the total body surface Eccrine sweat glands
Sweat glands located in the axilla & gential regions. Englarge and begin to function at puberty Apocrine Sweat Glands
One of the more common forms of skin cancer. Usually occurs on the upper face. Low potential for matastasizing Basal cell carcinoma
Malignant tumor of epidermis. Slow growing. Can matastasize. Most common Squamous cell carcinoma
malignant cancer of the skin characterized by purplish spots Kaposi sarcoma
Squamous cell carcinoma, Basal cell carcinoma, Malignant melanoma Types of skin cancer
Types of sweat glands eccrine & apocrine
Types of skin glands sweat (sudoriferous) and sebaceous
A receptor found deep in the dermis that detects pressure on the skin surface Pacinion Carpuscle
A sensory receptor located in the skin close to the surface that detects light touch Meissner's corpuscles
brown skin pigment Melanin
Specialized cells in the pigment layer that produce melanin Melanocytes
Oil producing gland in the skin Sebaceous Gland
Bluish appearance of the skin caused by lack of oxygen in the blood Cyanosis
Junction between the thin epidermal layer of the skin and the dermal layer providing support for the epidermis Dermal-Epidermal Junction
Upper region of the dermis that forms part of the dermal-epidermal junction and forms the ridges and groove of fingerprints Dermal Papillae
Small cap-shaped cluster of cells located at the base of the follicle where hair grows Hair papilla
a small tube where hair growth occcurs Hair follicle
specialized structures required for hair growth Follicles
Extremely fine and soft hair found on a new born infant. aka down Lanugo
Smooth muscles of the skin attached to hair follicles. Causes goosebumps Arrector Pili
Visible part of the nail Nail body
Part of the nail that is hidden by the cuticle Nail Root
skinfold covering the root of the nail Cuticle
Crescent shaped white area under the proximal nail bed Lunula
Specialized receptors in the skin that respond to pain Free nerve endings
Skin receptor that detects sensations of cold Krause end bulbs (bulboid corpuscles)
Substance that gives color to skin Pigment
Innermost layer of the epidermis Stratum Germinativum
Tough outer layer of the epidermis Stratum Corneum
Small cushion-like sacs found between moving parts Bursa
Thick slimy material that keeps membranes moist and soft Mucus
Serous membranes in the abdominal cavity Peritoneum
Serous membrane in the Thoracic Cavity Pleura
Inflammation of th Serous membrane in the abdominal cavity Peritonitis
Consider area burned and Severity of burn (depth) Burn Classification
Protection, Tempurature, Sensory Skin Function
Sweat & Sebaceous Glands
Tough waterproof material, unique protein keratin
Connective tissue & fat Below (under) Dermis
Epidermis, Dermis, Subcutaneous Skin Layers
One of the most important organs of the body, many specialized structure Skin
Largest organ in the body Skin
Lubricates, Shock absorber, Thick and colorless Synovial Fluid
Line & cover joints, Produce Synovial Fluid Synovial Membrane
Epithelial membrane that lines the surfaces that open to the outside of the body. Secrete thick slimy mucus Mucous Membrane
Secretes thin watery fluid that reduces friction Epithelial Layer
Basement Membrane Connective Tissue
Closest to Cavity Wall Parietal
Closest to Organ Visceral
Skin, Primary organ of the Integumentary system, Approx. 16% of total body weight Cutaneous Membrane
Cutaneous, Serous, Mucous Epithelial Tissue Types
Composed of Special Types of connective tissue. No Epithelial cell present Connective Tissue Membranes
Composed of Epithelial Tissue and an underlying layer of special connective tissue Epithelial membranes
Skin, hair, nails, skin glands Integumentary System
Skin (covering) Integument
Epithelial & Connective Body Membranes
2 thin sheet like structures that cover organs, line body cavities, reduce friction & lubricate Body Membranes
Two layers - Connective Tissue and Epithelial Layer Serous Membrane
Layers are Visceral and Parietal Serous Membrane
Full Thickness Burn Third Degree Burn
Complete Destruction of the Epidermis Third Degree Burn
Complete destruction of dermis Third Degree Burn
Into Sub Q Layer Third Degree Burn
May involve muscle and bone Third Degree Burn
Danger of fluid loss, risk of infection, no pain Third Degree Burn
Deep Epidermis Burn Second Degree Burn
Damage to upper levels of dermis Second Degree Burn
Damage to sweat glands, hair follicles and subaceous glands Second Degree Burn
Pain, blisters, swelling, fluid loss, scarring Second Degree Burn
Surface of epidermis burn First Degree Burn
Reddening, No blistering, Minimum tissue destruction First Degree Burn
Created by: dmdisme