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Amos Fortune.

Free Man. By Elizabeth Yates

TermDefinition
swiftly Moving or capable of moving with great speed or velocity; fleet; rapid: a swift ship. 2. coming, happening, or performed quickly or without delay: a swift decision.
snuff out Extinguish, put a sudden end to, as in Three young lives were snuffed out in that automobile accident. This usage alludes to snuff in the sense of “put out a candle by pinching the wick,” an area itself called snuff from the late 1300s on. [Mid-1800s ] 2
obeisance deferential respect. "they paid obeisance to the prince" syn:respect, homage, worship, adoration, reverence, veneration, honor, submission, deference "he made a very formal, elaborate gesture of obeisance"
wreak(ed) cause (a large amount of damage or harm). "torrential rainstorms wreaked havoc yesterday" syn: inflict, bestow, mete out, administer, deliver, impose, exact, create, cause, result in, effect, engender, bring about, perpetrate, unleash, let loose, vent; fo
slight adjective -1. small in degree; inconsiderable. "a slight increase" syn:small, modest, tiny, minute, inappreciable, negligible, insignificant, minimal, remote, slim, faint, razor-thin; 2. (of a person or their build) not sturdy and strongly built. "she w
burden noun -1. a load, especially a heavy one. syn:load, weight, cargo, freight. "they shouldered their burdens" 2. the main theme or gist of a speech, book, or argument. "the burden of his views" verb -1. load heavily. "she walked forward burdened with a wo
dazzled verb -past tense: dazzled; past participle: dazzled. (of a bright light) blind (a person) temporarily. "she was dazzled by the headlights" syn:blind temporarily, deprive of sight "she was dazzled by the headlights" amaze or overwhelm (someone) with a part
seeth(ed) - to feel or show strong emotion (such as anger) even though you try to control it. - to be in a state of constant activity Seethe - seethed - seething transitive verb. 1- archaic : boil, stew 2 to soak or saturate in a liquid. intransitive verb
slump verb. 1. sit, lean, or fall heavily and limply, especially with a bent back. "she slumped against the cushions" syn:sit heavily, flop, flump, collapse, sink, fall; informalplunk oneself. "he slumped into a chair" 2. undergo a sudden severe or prolonged f
thrusting noun -the motion of pushing or lunging suddenly or violently. GEOLOGY -the pushing upward of the earth's crust.
utter a volley of words n. pl. vol·leys 1. a. A simultaneous discharge of a number of bullets or other projectiles. b. The bullets or projectiles so discharged. 2. A group of remarks, expressions, or actions directed toward a certain recipient or audience: a volley of oaths; a
hurled hurl (hûrl) v. hurled, hurl·ing, hurls. v.tr. 1. To throw with great force; fling. See Synonyms at throw. 2. To cause to move with great force or violence: The bus's sudden stop hurled the passengers to the floor. 3. To send with great vigor; thrust:
withes 1. (Forestry) a strong flexible twig, esp of willow, suitable for binding things together; withy 2. (Forestry) a band or rope of twisted twigs or stems 3. (Tools) a handle made of elastic material, fitted on some tools to reduce the shock during use
cringed 1. to shrink or flinch, esp in fear or servility 2. to behave in a servile or timid way 3. informal a. to wince in embarrassment or distaste b. to experience a sudden feeling of embarrassment or distaste
thud 1. a dull heavy sound: the book fell to the ground with a thud. 2. a blow or fall that causes such a sound vb, thuds, thudding or thudded to make or cause to make such a sound
bewilderment 1. The condition of being confused or disoriented. 2. A situation of perplexity or confusion; a tangle: a bewilderment of lies and half-truths.
squatted v. squat·ted, squat·ting, squats - v.intr. 1. To sit in a crouching position with knees bent and the buttocks on or near the heels. 2. To crouch down, as an animal does. 3. To settle on unoccupied land without legal claim. 4. To occupy a given piece of public land in order to acquire title to it. v.tr. 1. To put (oneself) into a crouching posture. 2. To occupy as a squatter. 3. Sports To lift (an amount of weight) when doing a squat.
quiver quiv·ered, quiv·er·ing, quiv·ers 1. To shake with a slight, rapid, tremulous movement. 2. To tremble, as from cold or strong emotion. See Synonyms at shake. n. The act or motion of quivering.
cunning Noun 1. cunning - shrewdness as demonstrated by being skilled in deception cunning - craftiness, foxiness, guile, slyness, wiliness, craft. astuteness, perspicacity, shrewdness - intelligence manifested by being astute (as in business dealings)
bide 1. To remain in a condition or state. 2. a. To wait; tarry. b. To stay: bide at home. c. To be left; remain. v.tr. past tense bided To await; wait for. Idiom: bide (one's) time. To wait for further developments.
abashed a·bashed, a·bash·ing, a·bash·es To make ashamed or uneasy; disconcert. See Synonyms at embarrass. adj ill at ease, embarrassed, or confused; ashamed aˈbashedly adv
ripple v. rip·pled, rip·pling, rip·ples v.intr. 1. a. To form or display little undulations or waves on the surface, as disturbed water does. b. To flow with such undulations or waves on the surface. 2. To rise and fall gently in tone or volume. v.tr. To cause to form small waves or undulations. n. 1. A small wave. 2. A wavelike motion; an undulation: the ripple of a flag. 3. A sound like that made by rippling water: a ripple of laughter.
hastened v. has·tened, has·ten·ing, has·tens v.intr. To move or act swiftly. See Synonyms at speed. v.tr. 1. To cause to move or act swiftly: The guard hastened him out of the room.
sedgy Adj.1. sedgy - covered with sedges (grasslike marsh plants) plant life, flora, plant - (botany) a living organism lacking the power of locomotion grassy - abounding in grass
hue n. 1. The property of colors by which they can be perceived as ranging from red through yellow, green, and blue, as determined by the dominant wavelength of the light. See Table at color.
furrows n. 1. A long, narrow, shallow trench made in the ground by a plow. 2. A rut, groove, or narrow depression: snow drifting in furrows. 3. A deep wrinkle in the skin, as on the forehead. v. fur·rowed, fur·row·ing, fur·rows. v.tr. 1. To make long, narrow, shallow trenches in; plow. 2. To form grooves or deep wrinkles in. v.intr. - To become furrowed or wrinkled.
tillage 1. Cultivation of land. 2. Land that has been tilled.
hemmed v. hemmed, hem•ming, n. v.t. 1. to fold back and sew down the edge of (cloth, a garment, etc.); form an edge or border on or around. 2. to enclose or confine (usu. fol. by in, around, or about): hemmed in by enemies. n. 3. an edge made by folding back the margin of cloth and sewing it down. 4. the bottom edge or border of a garment, drape, etc. 5. the edge, border, or margin of anything.
gnawed v. gnawed, gnaw·ing, gnaws. v.tr. 1. a. To bite, chew on, or erode with the teeth. b. To produce by gnawing: gnaw a hole. c. To erode or diminish gradually as if by gnawing: waves gnawing the rocky shore. 2. To afflict or worry persistently: fear that
seam 1. a. A line of junction formed by sewing together two pieces of material along their margins. b. A similar line, ridge, or groove made by fitting, joining, or lapping together two sections along their edges. c. A suture. d. A scar. 2. A line across a 3. A thin layer or stratum, as of coal or rock. v. seamed, seam·ing, seams v.tr. 1. To put together with or as if with a seam. 2. To mark with a groove, wrinkle, scar, or other seamlike line. v.intr. To become fissured or furrowed; crack open.
elation e·lat·ed, e·lat·ing, e·lates To fill with great joy or happiness; delight: We were elated by the good news. adj. Elated.
huddling v. hud·dled, hud·dling, hud·dles - v.intr. 1. To crowd together, as from cold or fear. 2. To draw or curl one's limbs close to one's body; crouch. 3. Football To gather in a huddle. 4. Informal To gather together for conference or consultation: During
bidding
willowy
reed
hailed
daze
hogsheads
put off
shrewd
Created by: vgarrido