Busy. Please wait.
or

show password
Forgot Password?

Don't have an account?  Sign up 
or

Username is available taken
show password

why


Make sure to remember your password. If you forget it there is no way for StudyStack to send you a reset link. You would need to create a new account.
We do not share your email address with others. It is only used to allow you to reset your password. For details read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.


Already a StudyStack user? Log In

Reset Password
Enter the associated with your account, and we'll email you a link to reset your password.

Remove Ads
Don't know
Know
remaining cards
Save
0:01
To flip the current card, click it or press the Spacebar key.  To move the current card to one of the three colored boxes, click on the box.  You may also press the UP ARROW key to move the card to the "Know" box, the DOWN ARROW key to move the card to the "Don't know" box, or the RIGHT ARROW key to move the card to the Remaining box.  You may also click on the card displayed in any of the three boxes to bring that card back to the center.

Pass complete!

"Know" box contains:
Time elapsed:
Retries:
restart all cards




share
Embed Code - If you would like this activity on your web page, copy the script below and paste it into your web page.

  Normal Size     Small Size show me how

Thoracic Wall

CCRI-Newport Q4

QuestionAnswer
5 fused vertebrae Sacral vertebrae
afferent neurons A neuron that usually conducts impulses from sensory receptors to the central nervous system. They are also called sensory neurons. This is a functional classification.
angle of Louis This is the manubriosternal joint and is at the level between the bodies of thoracic vertebrae 4 and 5. It is an important landmark as it is where the costal cartilage of rib 2, the first rib that can be palpated, joins the sternum.
anterior ramus Located on the anterior portion. This is a branch of a artery, nerve, or bone. For example, we have an anterior ramus of the spinal nerves, and the mandible has a ramus. It was named for Uncle Ramus.
anterior root the one of the two roots of a spinal nerve that passes anteriorly from the spinal cord and that consists of motor fibers
anulus fibrosus a ring of fibrous or fibrocartilaginous tissue (as of an intervertebral disk or surrounding an orifice of the heart)
Appendicular skeleton The appendicular skeleton is made up of the limbs and their girdles. It is one of the two physical divisions of the skeletal system. The other physical division is the axial skeleton.
arachnoid mater Middle layer of the meninges that resembles a spider web. It is impermeable to the cerebrospinal fluid, which normally is found between the arachnoid and pia mater. It is anchored to the underlying tissues by rootlets.
articular cartilage One of three components of diarthrosis which covers the articular surfaces of the bones that form the joint. This cartilage is hyaline cartilage and is very smooth. They help distribute pressure during movement, reduce friction, and absorb shock.
articular process either of two processes on each side of a vertebra that articulate with adjoining vertebrae
atlas The first cervical vertebra (C1). Atlas holds the head (globe shaped) on its shoulders. It is unusual in that it lacks a body of its own and also lacks a well developed spinous process.
axial skeleton The axial skeleton is made up of the skull, vertebral column, ribs and sternum. It is one of the two physical divisions of the skeletal system. The other physical division is the appendicular skeleton.
axis The second cervical vertebra (C2). It has the dens (odontoid process) that the atlas rotates around when one shakes their head 'no'. The dens was the body of the atlas during embryonic development, but, it breaks away and fuses to the body of the axis.
body of the sternum This is an alternate name for the body of the sternum (four fused bones). It makes reference that the body looks like a small sword. Don't blame me, I am the messenger.
brain Served by the vertebral artery an vertebral vein which pass through the transverse foramen on the cervical vertebrae.
cauda equina the roots of the upper sacral nerves that extend beyond the termination of the spinal cord at the first lumbar vertebra in the form of a bundle of filaments within the vertebral canal resembling a horse's tail
cerebrospinal fluid Originates from the brain. It is found in cavities of the central nervous system as well as between the arachnoid mater and the pia mater. Functionally, it is very important in reducing the potential of physical shock to the central nervous system.
cervical vertebrae Have a transverse foramen, a bifid spinous process and oblique articulation between vertebrae.
coccygeal vertebrae Most characteristics are poorly developed and the last several are generally fused.
coccyx a small bone that articulates with the sacrum and that usually consists of four fused vertebrae which form the terminus of the spinal column
conus medullaris (terminale) a tapering lower part of the spinal cord at the level of the first lumbar segment
coronal plane A plane that cuts a human into anterior and posterior portions. This plane would cut a cat into ventral and dorsal portions.
cranial nerves Part of the peripherial (physical) division of the nervous system.
dens (odontoid process) a toothlike process that projects from the anterior end of the axis in the spinal column, serves as a pivot on which the atlas rotates. Also known as odontoid process.
dura mater Translated this means 'tough mother' - you may know someone who fits this description. It is the outer layer of the meninges. Functionally it is important because it reduces the risk of abrasion of the inner layers and the central nervous system.
efferent neurons A neuron that conducts impulses from the central nervous system to an organ. They are also called motor neurons. This is a functional classification.
external intercostal muscle Aids in inspiration. any of 11 muscles on each side between the vertebrae and the junction of the ribs and their cartilages of which each arises from the caudal margin of one rib and is inserted into the cranial margin of the rib below
false ribs There are three pairs of false ribs. They are intermediate between the true ribs and the floating ribs. They are sometimes called vertebrochondral ribs. They differ from the true ribs because they do not directly articulate with the sternum.
filum terminale the slender threadlike prolongation of the spinal cord below the origin of the lumbar nerves : the last portion of the pia mater
floating ribs There are two pairs of floating ribs and they are the most inferior of the ribs. They are different from the other ribs of the thoracic region because they do not articulate anteriorly with the sternum or the costal cartilage of other ribs.
foramen magnum the opening in the skull through which the spinal cord passes to become the medulla oblongata
gladiolus This is an alternate name for the body of the sternum (four fused bones). It makes reference that the body looks like a small sword. Don't blame me, I am the messenger.
gray matter This is the central portion (control center) of the spinal cord and the outer portion of the brain. This is where the cell bodies of the interneurons and motor neurons exist.
handle This is an alternate name for the manubrium.
innermost intercostal muscle stabilizes the ribs
internal intercostal muscle Aids in expiration. any of 11 muscles on each side between the sternum and the line on a rib marking an insertion of the iliocostalis of which each arises from the inner surface of a rib and its corresponding costal cartilage.
interneurons A neuron that is completely within the central nervous system. Interneurons transmit impulses between the sensory neurons and the brain, the brain and the motor neurons, and in reflex arcs between the sensory and motor neurons.
intervertebral discs Exists between the vertebrae and composed of three parts; the articular cartilage, the anulus fibrosus that surrounds the disc, and the nucleus pulposus. Responsible for the curvatures that develop in the normal vertebral column.
intervertebral foramen any of the openings that give passage to the spinal nerves from the vertebral canal
lumbar vertebrae Has a blunt, short spinous process pointing posteriorly. A transverse process shaped like the wings of a glider and sagittal articulations.
manubrium an anatomical process or part shaped like a handle: the uppermost segment of the sternum
meninges These are coverings of the central nervous system. Functionally they are important for the protection they give to the CNS. There are three layers. From superficial to deep they are: 1. dura mater, 2. arachnoid mater, 3. pia mater.
motor neurons A neuron that conducts impulses from the central nervous system to an organ. They are also called efferent neurons. This is a functional classification.
neurovascular bundle Made up of a vein, artery, and nerve. Found deep and on the inferior side of a rib and in the subcostal groove.
nucleus pulposus an elastic pulpy mass lying in the center of each intervertebral fibrocartilage
oblique plane Any plane that is not a transverse, sagittal, or coronal plane.
pia mater Translated this means 'delicate mother'. It is a thin, vascular layer found covering the central nervous system. It shares its blood supply with the underlying nerve tissue.
posterior ramus Located on the posterior portion. This is a branch of a artery, nerve, or bone. For example, we have an anterior ramus of the spinal nerves, and the mandible has a ramus. It was named for Uncle Ramus.
posterior root the one of the two roots of a spinal nerve that passes posteriorly to the spinal cord and that consists of sensory fibers
potential space When two structures are touching each other, but are not physically attached we say there is a potential space between them. For example, there is a potential space between the dura mater and arachnoid mater. Normally they touch each other.
sacral vertebrae This is the region of the vertebral column between the lumbar region and the coccyx. The five sacral vertebrae are unusual because they are fused together.
sagittal plane A plane that cuts a human or cat into left and right portions.
sensory neurons A neuron that usually conducts impulses from sensory receptors to the central nervous system. They are also called afferent neurons. This is a functional classification.
skull, vertebrae, ribs, and sternum Make up the Axial Skeleton.
spinal cord It begins at the medulla oblongata and extends inferiorly. Usually ends at the level of the inferior edge of lumbar vertebra 1 body. The outer portion is the white matter. The central portion is gray matter. It's covered by the meninges.
spinal nerves There are 31 pairs of spinal nerves. They arise from or return to the spinal cord.
spinous process the median spinelike dorsal process of the arch of a vertebra
sternebrae any of the four segments into which the body of the sternum is divided in childhood and which fuse to form the gladiolus
sternal angle This is the manubriosternal joint and is at the level between the bodies of thoracic vertebrae 4 and 5. It is an important landmark as it is where the costal cartilage of rib 2, the first rib that can be palpated, joins the sternum.
sternum A compound ventral bone or cartilage that lies in the median central part of the body of most vertebrates above fishes and that in humans is about seven inches (18 centimeters) long. Also known as the breastbone
subarachnoid space the space between the arachnoid and the pia mater through which the cerebrospinal fluid circulates and across which extend delicate trabeculae of connective tissue
thoracic vertebrae Articulations with the ribs – superior demifacet, inferior demifacet, transverse costal facet. They have a long spinous process pointing inferiorly and a transverse process shaped like a V (ribs shape them like a V by pushing them out).
transverse foramen Part of the cervical vertebrae. The vertebral artery and vertebral vein pass through this to serve the brain.
transverse process This structure is a part of a vertebra that usually extends laterally from the junction of the pedicle and the lamina.
VAN (vein, artery nerve) Superior to inferior. Known as the neurovascular bundle.
vertebral arteries and veins Pass through the cervical vertebrae to serve the brain.
vertebral foramen It gets smaller as we move inferiorly because the spinal cord is tapered and gets smaller in diameter.
white matter Outer portion of the spinal cord and the central portion of the brain. Contains the axons of the neurons, but no cell bodies. These axons allow the parts of the central nervous system to communicate with each other.
xiphoid process the smallest and lowest division of the human sternum that is cartilaginous early in life but becomes more or less ossified during adulthood
Created by: kboyer