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Thoracic Topography

CCRI-Newport Q3

QuestionAnswer
12 pairs (24) Number of pairs of ribs the human body has (7 true, 3 false, and 2 floating)
4 inches or 10 centimeters, l and r of midsternal line Midclavicular Reference Line (middle of clavicle)
acromion process Most distal bony protuberance of the shoulder.
ampulla Also known as the lactiferous sinus. This is a dilation of the lacrimal duct where milk accumulates when an infant is nursing. Functionally it acts much like a turkey baster bulb.
angle of Louis (sternal angle) This is the manubriosternal joint and is at the level between the bodies of thoracic vertebrae 4 and 5. It is an important landmark as it is where the costal cartilage of rib 2, the first rib that can be palpated, joins the sternum
anterior axillary fold Also known as the pectoral fold. Mostly pectoralis major. Axillary (axial) tail of mammary gland is superficial to this fold.
apex of the heart This is the pointed inferior end of the heart. It usually comes in contact with the thoracic wall at intercostal space 5, midclavicular, left side
areola A circular area of skin that surrounds the nipple. It is usually pigmented, and often becomes more pigmented during pregnancy. It is possible that this helps infants visually locate the nipple.
axial tail This portion of the mammary gland extends toward the axilla, making the shape of the breast almost like a tear drop. Lateral attachment of the mammary gland.
axillary tail This portion of the mammary gland extends toward the axilla, making the shape of the breast almost like a tear drop. Lateral attachment of the mammary gland.
clavicle Can be palpated laterally to the suprasternal notch
cervical vertebra 7, spinous process Superior most spinous process
body (gladiolus) of the sternum This is an alternate name for the body of the sternum (four fused bones). It makes reference that the body looks like a small sword. Don't blame me, I am the messenger.
Cooper's ligament (Suspensory Ligament) Primarily connective tissue found between the lactiferous glands of the breast. They extend through the mammary gland from the skin to the superficial muscle. Functionally they are important because the provide support to the mammary gland.
coracoid process Can be palpated at the lateral portion of the infraclacivular fossa
distal end of clavicle Articulates with the acromion process of the scapula
costal margin Inferior edge of rib cage, midaxillary – Rib 10
endocrine gland A gland that produces hormones. Endocrine glands lack ducts. Their secretions are usually distributed by the circulatory system or the lymphatic system.
exocrine gland A gland that produces secretions that pass through a duct (except for one-celled goblet cells). The secretions pass into a cavity or onto the surface of the body.
inferior angle of the scapula Thoracic Vertebra 7, spinous process
infraclavicular fossa Depression inferior to clavicle, at the lateral portion we can palpate the coracoids process, deep is the subclavian artery and vein.
intercostal space This is the space between the ribs. This space is occupied by the intercostal muscles. The number of the space is the same as the rib superior to the space.
jugular notch This is a depression at the superior end of the manubrium. It is significant because the trachea lies deep to the skin. A tracheotomy can be performed at this landmark. Normally it is at the level between the bodies of thoracic vertebrae 2 and 3.
intrafascial development The mammary gland develops from structures within the superficial fascia. This is known as intrafascial development.
juvenile phase of breast development First phase of mammary gland development
male nipple Left and right, Midclavicular, ICS 4
lactiferous gland An exocrine gland capable of producing milk when stimulated by prolactin, a hormone produced by the anterior pituitary gland, during pregnancy. Their development is primarily controlled by the hormone estrogen. They are modified sweat glands.
lactiferous sinus Also known as the ampulla. This is a dilation of the lacrimal duct where milk accumulates when an infant is nursing. Functionally it acts much like a turkey baster bulb.
lateral border of the sternum Medial attachment of the mammary gland.
lungs Superior lobe projects about 1 inch superior to the clavicle – Part of the supraclavicular fossa.
lactiferous duct The lactiferous duct (quack) transports milk from the lactiferous gland to the nipple. It DOES NOT PRODUCE MILK, IT TRANSPORTS IT.
manubriosternal joint Also known as the Angle of Louis or sterna angle and is at the level between the bodies of thoracic vertebrae 4 and 5. It is an important landmark as it is where the costal cartilage of rib 2, the first rib that can be palpated, joins the sternum.
manubrium (handle) This is an alternate name for the manubrium. It articulates at the sterna angle.
midaxillary line From the middle of the axilla (armpit) inferiorly.
midclavicular line 4inches or 10 centimeters, left and right of midsternal line
midsternal line middle of the sternum
multiparous phase of breast development Second phase of mammary gland development
nipple Should be in the middle in absence of gravity
pectoral fold Also known as the anterior axillary fold. Mostly pectoralis major. Axillary (axial) tail of mammary gland is superficial to this fold.
pectoralis major Makes up most of the pectoral fold.
proximal end of clavicle Articulates with the manubrium
rib 10, midaxillary, l and r Costal margin reference line.
rib 6, midclavicular line, l and r Inferior attachment of mammary gland.
rib 2, midclavicular line, l and r Superior attachment of mammary gland.
rib 2 Articulates at the sterna angle with the gladiolus and manubrium.
scapular line This line passes through the inferior angle of the scapula. This is a topographic landmark.
sebaceous gland An exocrine gland found in the skin. It produces an oily secretion called sebum. This secretion reduces cracking of the skin.
senile phase of breast development Third phase of the mammary gland.
spine of the scapula Thoracic vertebra 3, spinous process.
sternal angle (angle of Louis) This is the manubriosternal joint and is at the level between the bodies of thoracic vertebrae 4 and 5. It is an important landmark as it is where the costal cartilage of rib 2, the first rib that can be palpated, joins the sternum.
subcostal (infrasternal) angle The angle between the left and right costal margins. The subcostal angle can change due to heavy breathing. For example, when exercising.
superior angle of the scapula Thoracic vertebra 2, spinous process.
superior lobe of the lung projects about 1 inch superior to the clavicle – Part of the supraclavicular fossa.
uprasternal notch This is a depression at the superior end of the manubrium. It is significant because the trachea lies deep to the skin. A tracheotomy can be performed at this landmark. Normally it is at the level between the bodies of thoracic vertebrae 2 and 3.
supraclavicular fossa Depression superior to clavicle.
thoracic vertebra 3, spinous process Spine of the scapula
thoracic vertebra 2, spinous process Superior angle of the scapula
suspensory ligament (Cooper’s Ligament) Primarily connective tissue found between the lactiferous glands of the breast. They extend through the mammary gland from the skin to the superficial muscle. Functionally they are important because the provide support to the mammary gland.
Created by: kboyer