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KIN 2500 Test 5

QuestionAnswer
Supplies the heart right and left coronary arteries
Branches of the brachiocephalic trunk common carotid artery subclavian artery
Supplies the right side of the head and neck right common carotid artery
supplies the right upper limb right subclavian artery
supplies the left side of the head and neck left common carotid artery
supplies the left upper limb left subclavian artery
Supplies the pericardium pericardial arteries
supplies the bronchi of the lungs bronchial arteries
supplies the esophagus esophageal arteries
supplies the structures of the mediastinum mediastinal arteries
supplies the intercostal and chest muscles posterior intercostal arteries subcostal arteries
supplies the superior and posterior surfaces of the diaphragm superior phrenic arteries
supplies the inferior surface of the diaphragm inferior phrenic arteries
Arteries of the celiac trunk common hepatic artery left gastric artery splenic artery
Supplies the liver, stomach, duodenum, and pancreas common hepatic artery
Supplies the stomach and esophagus left gastric artery
Supplies the spleen, pancreas, and stomach splenic artery
Supplies the small intestine, cecum, ascending and transverse colons, and pancreas superior mesenteric artery
Supplies the adrenal (superarenal) glands superarenal arteries
Supplies the kidneys renal arteries
Gonadal arteries testicular arteries ovarian arteries
supplies the transverse, descending, and sigmoid colons and the rectum inferior mesenteric artery
branches of the common iliac artery external iliac artery internal iliac artery
supplies the lower limbs external iliac artery
supplies the uterus (female), prostate (male), muscles of buttocks, and urinary bladder internal iliac arteries
Largest artery in the body aorta
divisions of the aorta ascending aorta, arch of the aorta, thoracic aorta, and abdominal aorta
Contains the aortic valve gives off two coronary arteries arches to the left to form the arch of the aorta directed superiorly, slightly anteriorly, and to the right ends @ level of the sternal angle become arch of the aorta post to pulm trunk+ r. au ascending aorta
Descending part of the aorta that ends at the level of the intervertebral disc between the fourth and fifth thoracic vertebrae arch of the aorta
descending part of the aorta that lies close to the vertebral bodies passes through the thorax to the aortic hiatus of the diaphragm thoracic aorta
Descending part of the aorta after passing through the aortic hiatus of the diaphragm Descends to the level of the fourth lumbar vertebra abdominal aorta
Divisions of the abdominal aorta after passing to the level of the fourth lumbar vertebra Carry blood to the pelvis and the free lower limbs common iliac arteries
three dilations of the ascending aorta give rise to the right and left coronary arteries aortic sinuses
Branch of the right coronary artery that supplies both ventricles posterior interventricular branch
branch of the right coronary artery that supplies the right ventricle only marginal branch
branch of the left coronary artery that supplies both ventricles anterior ventricular branch/ left anterior descending (LAD) branch
branch of the coronary artery that supplies the left atrium and the left ventricle circumflex branch
first branch of the arch of the aorta; divides to form the right subclavian artery and the right common carotid artery brachiocephalic artery
Supplies the head, neck, upper limb, and thoracic wall brachiocephalic artery
extends from the brachiocephalic artery to the inferior border of the first rib; gives rise to a number of branches at the base of the neck right subclavian artery
Supplies the brain, spinal cord, neck, shoulder, thoracic muscle wall, and scapular muscles right subclavian artery
arises from the first part of the subclavian artery, descends posterior to the costal cartilages of the superior 6 ribs just lateral to the sternum; ends at 6th intercostal space by bifurcating and sends branches into intercostal spaces internal thoracic (mammary) artery
Vessel used in coronary artery bypass grafting, the artery that is used to create the bypass internal thoracic (mammary) artery
major branch to the brain of the right subclavian artery before it passes into the axilla; ascends through the neck, passes through the transverse foramina of the cervical vertebrae, and enters the skill via the foramin magnum to reach inf. brain surf. vertebral artery
left vertebral artery +right vertebral artery basilar artery
passes along the midline of the anterior aspect of the brain stem and gives off several branches (posterior cerebral and cerebellar arteries) basilar artery
branches of the basilar artery posterior cerebral artery cerebellar artery
continuiation of the right subclavian artery into the axilla; begins where the subclavian artery passes the inferior border of the first rib and ends as it crosses the distal margin of the teres major muscle; gives rise to many branches in the axilla axillary artery
continuation of the axillary artery into the arm; begins at the distal border of the teres major muscle and terminates by bifurcating into the radial and ulnar arteries just distal to the bend of the elbow; superficial and palpable along the medial arm brachial artery
as descends towards the elbow it curves laterally and passes through the cubital fossa, a triangular depression anterior to the elbow, where you can easily detect the pulse and listen to sounds brachial artery
supplies the anterior thoracic wall internal thoracic (mammary) artery
supplies the posterior portion of the cerebrum, the cerebellum, pons, and inner ear vertebral artery
supplies the thoracic, shoulder, and scapular muscles and the humerus axillary artery
supplies the muscles of the arm, humerus, and elbow joint brachial artery
Where blood pressure is usually measured brachial artery
smaller branch of brachial bifurcation; direct contin. of brachial artery; passes along the lateral (radial) aspect of forearm & enters wrist where it bifurcates to superficial/ deep that anastomose w/ branch of ulnar artery to form palmar arches of hand radial artery
makes contact with the distal end of the radius at the wrist where it is covered by only fascia and skin radial artery
major blood source to the muscles of the posterior compartment of the forearm radial artery
due to superficial position, artery used as a common site for measuring pulse (_____ pulse) radial artery
large branch of the brachial artery that passes along the medial (ulnar) aspect of the forearm and into the wrist where it branches into super. and deep branches that enter hand; branches anastomose w/ branches of radial artery to form hand palmar arches ulnar artery
major blood source to the muscles of the anterior compartment of the forearm ulnar artery
formed mainly by the superficial branch of the ulnar artery w/ a contribution from the superficial branch of the radial artery; superficial to the long flexor tendons of the fingers and extends across the palm of the bases of the metacarpals superficial palmar arch
gives rise to the common palmar digital arteries superficial palmar arch
supplies the muscles, bones, joints, and skin of the palm and fingers superficial palmar arch
divisions of the common palmar digital arteries proper palmar digital arteries
arises mainly from the deep branch of the radial artery & receives contribution from deep branch of ulnar artery; deep to the long flexor tendons of the fingers and extends across the palm just distal to the bases of the metacarpals deep palmar arch
gives rise to the palmar metacarpal arteries deep palmar arch
anastomose with the common palmar digital arteries from the superficial arch palmar metacarpal arteries
supplies the muscles, bones, and joints of the palms and fingers deep palmar arch
begins with the bifurcation of the brachiocephalic trunk, posterior to the right sternoclavicular joint; passes superiorly into the neck to supply structures in the head; divides into right external/ internal arteries at the superior border of larynx right common carotid artery
supplies the head and neck right common carotid artery left common carotid artery
begins at the superior border of the larynx and terminates near the temporomandibular joint of the parotid gland where it divides into two branches: superficial temporal and maxillary arteries external carotid artery
two divisions of the external carotid artery superficial temporal artery maxillary artery
major blood source to all structures of the head except the brain; supplies skin, CT, muscles, bones, joints, dura, and arachnoid mater in the head and supplies much of the neck anatomy external carotid artery
arises from common carotid artery; enters the cranial cavity through the carotid foramen in the temporal bone and emerges in the cranial cavity near the base of the sella turcica of the sphenoid bone; gives rise to numerous branches inside the cranial cav internal carotid artery
terminates as the anterior cerebral and middle cerebral arteries internal carotid artery
passes forward toward the frontal lobe of the cerebrum anterior cerebral artery
passes laterally between the temporal and parietal lobes of the cerebrum middle cerebral artery
inside the cranium: the anastomoses of the left and right internal carotid arteries via the anterior communicating artery b/w the 2 anterior cerebral arteries along w/ internal carotid-basilar artery anastomoses; at the base of the brain cerebral arterial circle/ circle of posterior communicating arteries
posterior communicating arteries arising from internal carotid artery anastomose with the posterior cerebral arteries from the basilar artery to link the internal carotid supply w/ vertebral blood supply internal carotid-basilar anastomosis
equalizes blood pressure to the brain and provides alternate routes for blood flow to the brain (should the arteries be damaged) cerebral arterial circle
supplies the eyeball and other orbital structures, ear, and parts of the nose and nasal cavity; frontal, temporal, parietal lobes of the cerebrum of brain, pituitary gland, and pia mater internal carotid artery
arises as the second branch of the arch of the aorta and ascends through the mediastinum to enter the neck deep to the clavicle then follows a similar path to the right common carotid artery left common carotid artery
arises as the third and final branch of the arch of the aorta; passes superior and lateral through the mediastinum and deep to the clavicle at the base of the neck as it courses toward the upper limb; has a similar course to that of the right side left subclavian artery
2-3 small arteries that arise from variable levels of the thoracic aorta and pass forward to the pericardial sac surrounding the heart pericardial arteries
supplies the tissues of the pericardial sac pericardial arteries
arise from the thoracic aorta or 1 of its branches; right bronchial artery typically arises from the 3rd posterior intercostal artery; 2 left bronchial arteries arise from the upper end of the thoracic aorta; all follow the bronchial tree into the lungs supply the tissues of the bronchial tree and surrounding lung tissue down to the level of alveolar ducts
4-5 arteries that arise from the anterior surface of the thoracic aorta and pass forward to branch onto the esophagus esophageal arteries
supplies all the tissues of the esophagus esophageal arteries
arise from various points on the thoracic aorta mediastinal arteries
supplies assorted tissues within the mediastinum, primarily connective tissue and lymph nodes mediastinal arteries
typically, 9 pairs of arteries from the posterolateral aspect on each side of the thoracic aorta; each passes laterally and anteriorly through intercostal space where they will anastomose with anterior branches from the internal thoracic arteries posterior intercostal arteries
supplies the skin, muscles, and ribs of the thoracic wall; thoracic vertebrae, meninges, and spinal cord; mammary glands posterior intercostal arteries
the lowest segmental branches of the thoracic aorta; one on each side passes into the thoracic body wall inferior to the 12th rib and courses forward into the upper ab. region of the body wall subcostal arteries
supplies the skin, muscles, and ribs, 12th thoracic vertebra, meninges, and spinal cord subcostal arteries
arise from the lower end of the thoracic aorta and pass onto the superior surface of the diaphragm superior phrenic arteries
supplies the diaphragm muscle and pleura covering the diaphragm superior phrenic arteries
1st visceral branch of the aorta inferior to the diaphragm; arises from the abdominal aorta at the level of the 12th thoracic vertebra as the aorta passes through the hiatus in the diaphragm; divides into 3 branches celiac trunk (artery)
three branches of the celiac trunk left gastric, splenic, and common hepatic arteries
supplies all the organs of the GI tract from the abdominal part of the esophagus to the duodenum, and also the spleen celiac trunk
smallest of the three celiac branches; arises superiorly to the left toward the esophagus and then turns to follow the lesser curvature of the stomach (here anastomoses with the right gastric artery) left gastric artery
supplies the abdominal part of the esophagus and lesser curvature of the stomach left gastric artery
largest branch of the celiac trunk; arises from the left side of the celiac rink distal to the left gastric artery and passes horizontally to the left along the pancreas; gives rise to 3 names arteries splenic artery
names arteries that branch from the splenic artery pancreatic arteries left gastroepiglotic (gastro-omental) artery short gastric arteries
supplies the spleen, pancreas, fundus, and greater curvature of the stomach and greater omentum splenic artery
series of small arteries that arise from the splenic artery and descend into the tissue of the pancreas pancreatic arteries
arises from the terminal end of the splenic artery and passes from left to right along the greater curvature of the stomach left gastroepiglotic (gastro-omental) artery
supplies the greater curvature of the stomach and greater omentum Left gastroepiglotic (gastro-omental) artery
arise from the terminal end of the splenic artery and pass onto the fundus of the stomach short gastric arteries
supplies the fundus of the stomach short gastric arteries
intermediate in size b/w the left gastric and splenic arteries; arises from the right side of the celiac trunk and gives rise to three arteries common hepatic artery
three branches of the common hepatic artery proper hepatic artery right gastric artery gastroduodenal artery
supplies the liver, gallbladder, lesser momentum, stomach, pancreas, and gallbladder common hepatic artery
branches from the common hepatic artery and ascends along the bile ducts into the liver and gallbladder proper hepatic artery
supplies the liver, gallbladder, and lesser omentum proper hepatic artery
arises from the common hepatic artery and curves back to the left along the lesser curvature of the stomach where it anastomoses with the left gastric artery right gastric artery
supplies the stomach and lesser omentum right gastric artery
passes inferiorly toward the stomach and duodenum and sends branches along the greater curvature of the stomach gastroduodenal artery
supplies the stomach, duodenum, and pancreas gastroduodenal artery
arises from the anterior surface of the abdominal aorta about 1 cm inferior to the celiac trunk at the level of the 1st lumbar vertebra; extends interiorly & anteriorly b/w layers of the mesentery; extensive anastomoses and has 5 branches superior mesenteric artery
five branches of the superior mesenteric artery inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery jejunal and ilieal arteries ileocolic artery right colic artery middle colic artery
supplies all the organs of the GI tract from the duodenum to the transverse colon superior mesenteric artery
passes superiorly and to the right toward the head of the pancreas and the duodenum inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery
supplies the pancreas and the duodenum inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery
spread through the mesentery to pass to the loops of the jejunum and ileum (small intestine) jejunal and ileal arteries
supply the jejunum and the ileum jejunal arteries
passes inferiorly and laterally toward the right side toward the terminal part of the ileum, cecum, appendix, and 1st part of the ascending colon ileocolic artery
supplies the terminal part of the ileum, cecum, appendix, and 1st part of ascending colon ileocolic artery
passes laterally to the right toward the ascending colon right colic artery
supplies the ascending colon and first part of the transverse colon right colic artery
ascends slightly to the right toward the transverse colon middle colic artery
supplies most of the transverse colon middle colic artery
arises from the anterior aspect of the abdominal aorta at the level of the 3rd lumbar vertebra and then passes inferiorly to the left of the aorta; anastomoses extensively and has three branches inferior mesenteric artery
three branches of the inferior mesenteric artery left colic artery sigmoid arteries superior rectal artery
supplies all organs of the GI tract from the transverse colon to the rectum inferior mesenteric artery
descend laterally to the left toward the sigmoid colon sigmoid arteries
supplies the sigmoid colon sigmoid arteries
ascends laterally to the left toward the distal end of the transverse colon and the descending colon left colic artery
supplies the end of the transverse colon and descending colon left colic artery
descend laterally to the left toward the sigmoid colon sigmoid arteries
supply the sigmoid colon sigmoid arteries
passes inferiorly to the superior part of the rectum superior rectal artery
supplies the upper part of the rectum superior rectal artery
typically 3 pairs (sup., middle, inf) but only the middle pair originates from the abdominal aorta; middle arise from ab. aorta at the level of the 1st lumbar vertebra at or superior to the renal arteries; sup. arise from inf. phrenic; inf. from renal suprarenal arteries
supply the suprarenal (adrenal) glands suprarenal arteries
right & left from lateral aspects of ab. aorta at sup. border of the 2nd lumbar vertebra, ~1cm inf. to sup. mesenteric artery renal arteries
right (longer than left) slightly lower than left & passes post. to right renal vein and inf. vena cava; left post. to left renal vein & + by inf. mesenteric vein renal arteries
supplies all tissues of the kidneys renal arteries
arise from the ant. aspect of the ab. aorta at level of the 2nd lumbar vertebra just inf. to renal arteries gonadal arteries
gonadal arteries in males, descend along the posterior ab wall to pass through the inguinal canal and descend into the scrotum testicular arteries
supplies the testis, epididymis, ductus deferens, and ureters testicular arteries
gonadal arteries in females; shorter than the arteries in the males and remain within the ab cavity ovarian arteries
supply the ovaries, uterine (fallopian) tubes, and ureters ovarian arteries
arises from the post. surface of the ab. aorta ~1cm superior to the bifurcation of the aorta into the right and left common iliac arteries median sacral artery
supplies the sacrum, coccyx, sacral spinal nerves, and piriformis muscle median sacral artery
first paired branches of the ab. aorta and arise immediately superior to the origin of the celiac trunk (may also arise from the renal arteries) inferior phrenic arteries
supply the diaphragm and suprarenal (adrenal) glands inferior phrenic arteries
4 pairs arise from the posterolateral surface of the ab. aorta in a way similar to the posterior intercostal arteries of the thorax; pass laterally into the ab. muscle wall and curve toward the anterior aspect of the wall lumbar arteries
supply the lumbar vertebrae, spinal cord and meninges, skin and muscles of the posterior and lateral part of the ab. wall lumbar arteries
arise from the ab. aorta at about the level of the 4th lumbar vertebra; each passes inferiorly and slightly laterally for about 5 cm and gives rise to 2 branches common iliac arteries
branches of the common iliac arteries internal iliac arteries external iliac arteries
supply the pelvic muscle, pelvic organs, external genitals, and lower limbs common iliac arteries
primary arteries of the pelvis, begin at bifurcation of the common iliac arteries to the sacroiliac joint at the level of the lumbosacral intervertebral disc; pass posteriorly as they descend into the pelvis and divide into ant. and post. divisions internal iliac arteries
supply the pelvic muscle wall, pelvic organs, buttocks, external genitals, and medial muscles of the thigh internal iliac arteries
larger than the internal and begin at the bifurcation of the common iliac arteries, descend along the medial border of the psoas major muscles follow pelvic brim, pass post. to midportion of inguinal lig., and become femoral arteries external iliac arteries
supply the lower ab. wall, cremaster muscle in males and round ligament of uterus in females, and the lower limb external iliac arteries
continuations of the external iliac arteries as they enter the thigh; superficial along w/ femoral vein, nerve, and deep inguinal lymph nodes in femoral triangle femoral arteries
pass beneath the sartorius muscle as they descend along the anteromedial aspents of the thighs and follow its course to distal end of thigh where they pass through an opening in the tendon of adducts magnus to end at post. aspect of knee become pop. art femoral arteries
supply muscles of the thigh--quadriceps, adductors, and hamstrings, femur, and ligaments and tendons around knee joint femoral arteries
catheter inserted through a blood vessel and advanced into the major vessels to access a heart chamber cardiac catheterization
artery in which the catheter is inserted in cardiac catheterization to reach the left side of the heart femoral artery
continuation of the femoral arteries through the popliteal fossa (space behind the knee); descend to the inferior border of the popliteus muscles where they divide into the anterior and posterior tibial arteries popliteal arteries
supply the muscles of the distal thigh, skin of the knee region, muscles of the proximal leg, knee joint, femur, patella, tibia, and fibula popliteal arteries
descend from the bifurcation of the popliteal arteries at the distal border of the popliteus muscles; smaller than the posterior tibial arteries; pass over interosseous membrane of tibia and fibula to descend through the anterior muscle compartment of leg anterior tibial arteries
become the dorsal arteries of the foot (dorsalis pedis arteries) at the ankles anterior tibial arteries
on the dorsum of the feet, the dorsal arteries of the foot give off a transverse branch at the first medial cuneiform bone; run laterally over the base of the metatarsals arcuate arteries
branch from the arcuate arteries; course along the metatarsal bones; terminate by dividing into the dorsal digital arteries dorsal metatarsal arteries
arteries that pass into the toes dorsal digital arteries
supply the tibia, fibula, anterior muscles of the leg, dorsal muscles of the foot, tarsal bones, metatarsal bones, and phalanges anterior tibial arteries
direct continuation of the popliteal arteries, descend from the bifurcation of the popliteal arteries; pass down the posterior muscular compartment of the legs deep to the soleus muscles posterior tibial arteries
pass post. to the medial malleolus at the distal end of the leg and curve forward toward the plantar surface of the feet; pass deep to the flexor retinaculum on the medial side of feet and terminate by branching into medial and lateral plantar arteries posterior tibial arteries
in the middle of the leg; from posterior tibial arteries; course laterally as they descend into the lateral compartment of the leg fibular (peroneal) arteries
from posterior tibial arteries; pass along the medial side of the sole medial plantar arteries
from posterior tibial arteries; angle toward lateral side of the sole and unite with a branch of the dorsal arteries of the foot to form the plantar arch lateral plantar arteries
arch that begins at the base of the 5th metatarsal and extends medially across the metatarsals; as it crosses the foot gives off plantar metatarsal arteries plantar arch
from plantar arch; course along the plantar surface of the metatarsal bones; terminate by dividing into plantar digital arteries plantar metatarsal arteries
from plantar metatarsal arteries; pass into the toes plantar digital arteries
supply the posterior and lateral muscle compartments of the leg, plantar muscles of the foot, tibia, fibula, tarsal, metatarsal, and phalangeal bones posterior tibial arteries
main vein of the heart; receives almost all venous blood from the myocardium; located in the coronary sulcus on the posterior aspect of the heart and opens into the right atrium b/w orifice of inf. vena cava & tricuspid valve; 3 veins drain into coronary sinus
three veins that drain into the coronary sinus great cardiac vein middle cardiac vein small cardiac vein
veins that drain directly into the right atrium anterior cardiac veins
drains all tissues of the heart coronary sinus
into the left end of the coronary sinus; from the anterior inter ventricular sulcus great cardiac vein
into the right end of the coronary sinus; from the posterior interventricular sulcus middle cardiac vein
into the right end of the coronary sinus small cardiac vein
empties blood into the superior part of the right atrium; begins posterior to the right first costal cartilage by the union of the right and left brachiocephalic veins and ends at level of right 3rd costal cartilage, where enters right atrium superior vena cava
drains the head, neck, upper limbs, and thorax superior vena cava
largest vein in the body, begins anterior to the 5th lumbar vertebra by the union of the common iliac veins, ascends behind the peritoneum to right of midline, pierces the caval opening of diaphragm at level of 8th thoracic vert. & enters inf right atrium inferior vena cava
drains the abdomen, pelvis, and lower limbs inferior vena cava
commonly compressed during the later stages of pregnancy by enlarged uterus producing edema of ankles and feet and temporary varicose veins inferior vena cava
begin at the base of the cranium as the sigmoid sinus and inf. petrosal sinus converge at the opening of the jugular foramen; descend within the carotid sheath lateral to the internal and common carotid arteries, deep to the sternocleidomastoid muscles internal jugular vein
receive numerous tributaries from the face and neck, anastomose with the subclavian veins to form the brachiocephalic veins deep and slightly lateral to the sternoclavicular joints internal jugular vein
major dural sinuses that contribute to the internal jugular vein superior saggital sinus inferior saggital sinus straight sinus sigmoid sinus cavernous sinuses
drain the brain, meninges, bones of the cranium, muscles and tissues of the face and neck internal jugular veins
begins at the frontal bone where it receives a vein from the nasal cavity; passes posteriorly to the occipital bone along the midline of the skull deep to the sagittal sinus; usually angles to the right and drains into the right transverse sinus superior sagittal sinus
drains the nasal cavity, superior, lateral, medial aspects of cerebrum, skill bones, and meninges superior sagittal sinus
much smaller than the superior sagittal sinus; beings posterior to the attachment of the flax cerebra and receives the great cerebral vein to become the straight sinus inferior sagittal sinus
drains the medial aspects of the cerebrum and diencephalon inferior sagittal sinus
runs in the tentorium cerebella and is formed by the union of the inferior sagittal sinus and the great cerebral vein; typically drains into the left transverse sinus straight sinus
are located along the posterior aspect of the petrous temporal bone; begin where the transverse sinuses and superior petrosal sinuses anastomose and terminate in the internal jugular vein at the jugular foramen sigmoid sinuses
drain the lateral and posterior aspects of the cerebrum and the cerebellum sigmoid sinuses
located on either side of the sphenoid bone; opthalmic veins from the orbits and the cerebral veins from the cerebral hemispheres, + other small sinuses, empty here cavernous sinuses
drain posteriorly to the petrosal sinuses to eventually return to the internal jugular veins cavernous sinuses
have major blood vessels and nerves passing through them on their way to the orbit and face cavernous sinuses
nerves and vessels that pass through the cavernous sinuses oculomotor (III) nerve trochlear (IV) nerve opthalmic and maxillary branches of the trigeminal (V) nerve abducens (VI) nerve internal carotid arteries
drains the orbits, nasal cavity, frontal regions of the cerebrum, and the superior aspect of the brain stem cavernous sinuses
begin in parotid glands near the angle of the mandible; descend through neck across sternocleidomastoid muscles; terminate at point opposite the middle of clavicles where empty into subclavian veins; prominent along side of neck when pressure increases external jugular veins
drain the scalp and skin of the head and neck, muscles of the face and neck, and oral cavity and pharynx external jugular veins
originate inferior to the occipital condyles; descend through successive transverse foramina of the 1st 6 cervical vertebrae and emerge from the foramina of the 6th cervical vertebra to enter the brachiocephalic veins in the root of the neck vertebral veins
drain cervical vertebrae, cervical spinal cord and meninges, and some deep muscles in the neck vertebral veins
continuations of the axillary veins; pass over the 1st rib deep to the clavicle to terminate at the sternal end of the clavicle where unite with the internal jugular veins to form the brachiocephalic veins subclavian veins
thoracic duct of the lymphatic system delivers lymph into the junction b/w left subclavian and left internal jugular veins; right lymphatic duct delivers lymph into the junction b/w the right subclavian and right internal jugular veins subclavian veins
drains the skin, muscles, bones of the arms, shoulders, neck, and superior thoracic wall subclavian veins
during central line placement this vein is frequently used to administer nutrients and medication and measure venous pressure subclavian veins
arise as the brachial veins and basilic veins unites near the base of the axilla; ascend to outer borders of 1st ribs where become the subclavian veins; receive numerous tributaries in the axilla that correspond to the branches of the axillary arteries axillary veins
drain the skin, muscles, bones of the arm, axilla, shoulder, and superolateral chest wall axillary veins
accompany the brachial arteries, begin in the anterior aspect of the elbow region where radial and ulnar veins join one another; ascend through arm, the basilic veins join to form the axillary vein near distal border of teres major muscle brachial veins
drain muscles and bones of the elbow and brachial regions brachial veins
begin at superficial palmar venous arches; course along the medial aspect of the forearms, pass alongside the ulnar arteries, and join with the radial veins to form the brachial veins ulnar veins
drain the muscles, bones, and skin of the hand, and muscles of the medial aspect of the forearm ulnar veins
drain the common palmar digital veins and the proper palmar digital veins in the palms superficial palmar venous arches
begin at the deep palmar venous arches, drain lateral aspects of the forearms and pass alongside the radial arteries; unite with ulnar veins to form the brachial veins just inferior to the elbow joint radial veins
drain the muscles and bones of the lateral hand and forearm radial veins
drain the palmar metacarpal veins in the palms deep palmar venous arches
begin on the lateral aspect of the dorsal venous networks of the hands (arches); arch around the radial side of the forearms to the anterior surface and ascend through entire limbs along anterolateral surface; end where join axillary veins inf. clavicle cephalic veins
networks of veins on the dorsum of the hands formed by the dorsal metacarpal veins that drain the dorsal digital veins dorsal venous networks of the hands (dorsal venous arches)
veins that pass along the sides of the fingers dorsal digital veins
drain integument and superficial muscles of the lateral aspect of the upper limb cephalic veins
originate either from a venous plexus on the dorsum of the forearms or from the medial aspects of the dorsal venous networks of the hands, and unite with the cephalic veins just inferior to the elbow accessory cephalic veins
begin on medial aspects of the dorsal venous networks of hands and ascend along the posteromedial surface of the forearm and anteromedial surface of the arm; connected to cephalic veins ant. to elbow by medial cubital veins basilic veins
after receiving median cubital veins, continue ascending until the reach the middle of the arm; penetrate the tissues deeply and run alongside the brachial arteries until they join with brachial veins to form the axillary veins basilic veins
drain integument and superficial muscles of the medial aspect of the upper limb basilic veins
begin in the palmar venous plexuses, drain the palmar digital veins in the fingers; ascend anteriorly in the forearms to join the basilic or median cubital veins (sometimes both) median antebrachial veins (median veins of the forearm)
networks of veins on the palms palmar venous plexuses
drain the integument and superficial muscles of the palm and anterior aspect of the upper limb median antebrachial veins (median veins of the forearm)
form by the union of the subclavian and internal jugular veins and the 2 brachioencephalic veins unite to form the superior vena cava;left longer than right; right is ant. to trunk and vertical; left ant. to trunk; approaches horiz. passes left to right brachiocephalic veins
drains the head, neck, upper limbs, mammary glands, and superior thorax brachiocephalic veins
unpaired vein that is anterior to the vertebral column, to right of midline; beings at the junction of right ascending lumbar and right subcostal veins near diaphragm; arches over root of right lung at level of 4th thoracic vert. to end in sup. vena cava azygos vein
tributaries received by azygos vein right posterior intercostal hemiazygos accessory hemiazygos esophageal mediastinal pericardial bronchial veins
drains the right side of the thoracic wall, thoracic viscera, and posterior abdominal wall azygos vein
anterior to the vertebral column and slightly left of the midline; begins at the junction of the left ascending lumbar and left subcostal veins; terminates by joining the azygos vein at level of 9th thoracic vert. hemiazygos vein
tributaries received by hemizygos vein 9-11 left posterior intercostal esophageal mediastinal sometimes accessory hemiazygos veins
drains the left side of the lower thoracic wall, thoracic viscera, and left posterior abdominal wall hemiazygos vein
anterior to the vertebral column and to left of midline; begins at 4th/5th intercostal space and descends from the 5-8 thoracic vertebra or ends in the hemiazygos vein; terminates by joining azygos at ~8th thoracic vertebra accessory hemiazygos vein
tributaries received by accessory hemiazygos vein 4-8 left posterior intercostal veins left bronchial mediastinal
arise on the inferior surface of diaphragm; left inferior phrenic vein usually sends one tributary to the left suprarenal vein (empties into left renal vein + other tributary into inf. vena cava); right empties into inferior vena cava inferior phrenic veins
drains the inferior surface of the diaphragm and adjoining peritoneal tissues inferior phrenic veins
typically 2-3, drain the sinusoidal capillaries of the liver which receive from hepatic portal vein hepatic veins
sends venous blood to the liver from the GI organs hepatic portal vein
tributaries of the hepatic portal vein left gastric vein right gastric vein splenic vein superior mesenteric vein
arises from the left side of the lesser curvature of the stomach and joins left side of the hepatic portal vein in lesser omentum left gastric vein
drains the terminal esophagus, stomach, liver, gallbladder, spleen, pancreas, small intestine, and large intestine left gastric vein
arises from the right aspect of the lesser curvature of the stomach and joins the hepatic portal vein on its anterior surface with the lesser omentum right gastric vein
drains lesser curvature of stomach and abdominal portion of the esophagus, stomach and duodenum right gastric vein
arises in the spleen and crosses the abdomen transversely posterior to the stomach to anastomose with the superior mesenteric vein to form the hepatic portal vein; receives inferior mesenteric vein near junction with hepatic portal vein splenic vein
drains the spleen, funds and greater curvature of the stomach, pancreas, greater omentum, descending colon, sigmoid colon, and rectum splenic vein
arises from numerous tributaries from most of the small intestine and the first half of the large intestine and ascends to join the splenic vein to form the hepatic portal vein superior mesenteric vein
drains the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, appendix, ascending colon, and transverse colon superior mesenteric vein
usually 4 on each side; course horiz. through the post. ab. wall with the lumbar arteries; connect at right angles with the right and left ascending lumbar veins (begin (hemi)azygos vein); join ascending lumbar veins then to inferior vena cava lumbar veins
drains posterior abdominal muscle wall, lumbar vertebrae, spinal cord and spinal nerves (cauda equina) within the vertebral canal, and meninges lumbar veins
pass medially from the adrenal (suprarenal) glands; left joins left renal, right joins inferior vena cava suprarenal veins
drains the adrenal (suprarenal) glands suprarenal veins
pass anterior to the renal arteries; left is longer than right and passes anterior to the ab. aorta; receives left gonadal, left inferior phrenic, and usually left suprarenal veins; right empties into inferior vena cava posterior to duodenum renal veins
drains the kidneys renal veins
ascend with the gonadal arteries along the posterior ab. wall gonadal veins
drain the testes; left joins left renal vein, right joins inferior vena cava testicular veins
drain the testes, epididymis, ductus of deferens testicular veins
drain the ovaries; left joins the left renal vein, right joins the inferior vena cava ovarian veins
drains the ovaries and uterus ovarian veins
formed by the union of the internal and external iliac veins anterior to the sacroiliac joint and anastomose anterior to the 5th lumbar vertebra to form the inferior vena cava; right is shorter than the left and more vertical common iliac veins
drains the pelvis, external genitals, and the lower limbs common iliac veins
begin near the superior portion of the greater sciatic notch and run medial to their corresponding arteries internal iliac veins
drains muscles of the pelvic wall and gluteal region, pelvic viscera, and external genitals internal iliac veins
begin at the inguinal ligaments as the continuations of the femoral veins; end anterior to the sacroiliac joints where they join with the internal iliac veins to form the common iliac veins external iliac veins
drains the lower abdominal wall anteriorly, cremaster muscle in males, and the external genitals and lower limb external iliac veins
continuations of the popliteal veins just superior to the knee where the veins pass through an opening in the adductor magnus muscle; ascend deep to the sartorial muscle and emerge from beneath muscle in the femoral triangle at the proximal end of thigh femoral veins
receive the deep veins of the thigh and the great saphenous veins just before penetrating the abdominal wall; pass below the inguinal ligament and enter the abdominopelvic region to become the external iliac veins femoral veins
drain the skin, lymph nodes, muscles, and bones of the thigh, and the external genitals femoral veins
formed by union of anterior and posterior tibial veins at the proximal end of the leg; ascend through the popliteal fossa with the popliteal arteries and tibial nerve; terminate where pass through a window in adductor magnus muscle and pass to front knee popliteal veins
becomes the femoral veins; receive blood from the small saphenous veins and tributaries that correspond to branches of the popliteal artery popliteal veins
drain the knee joint and skin, muscles, and bones around the knee joint popliteal veins
begin posterior to the medial malleolus at the union of the medial and lateral plantar veins from the plantar surface of the foot; ascend through leg with posterior tibial artery and the tibial nerve deep to the soleus muscle; join posterior tibial veins posterior tibial veins
join the anterior tibial veins near the top of the interosseous membrane to form the popliteal veins posterior tibial veins
drains the skin, muscles, and bones on the plantar surface of the foot, and skin, muscles, and bones from the posterior and lateral aspects of the leg posterior tibial veins
formed by the uniting plantar digital veins on the plantar surface of the foot; parallel the metatarsals plantar metatarsal veins
formed by the uniting of the plantar metatarsal veins deep plantar venous arches
emerge from the deep plantar venous arches medial and lateral plantar veins
arise in dorsal venous arch and accompany anterior tibial artery; ascend deep to tibialis anterior muscle on anterior surface of interosseous mem.; pass through opening at superior end of interosseous membrane to join post. tibial veins to form pop. veins anterior tibial veins
longest veins in the body; ascend from the foot to the groin in the subcutaneous layer; begin at medial end of dorsal venous arches of foot; receive tributaries from superficial tissues and connect with deep veins too; empty into femoral veins at groin great (long) saphenous veins
drain the integumentary tissues and superficial muscles of the lower limbs, groin, and lower abdominal wall great (long) saphenous veins
more likely to be subject to variscosities than other veins in lower limbs because they support a long column of blood and are not well supported by skeletal muscles great (long) saphenous veins
begin at the lateral aspect of the dorsal venous arches of the foot; pass posterior to the lateral malleolus of the fibula and ascend deep to the skin along the post. aspect of the leg; empty into the pop. veins at pop. fossa, post to knee; 9-12 valves small saphenous veins
drain the integumentary tissues and superficial muscles of the foot and posterior aspect of the leg small saphenous veins
Created by: fvenab1