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Am. Gov. Midterm

American Government Midterm Review

QuestionAnswer
What are the four features of all states? Population, Government, Territory, Sovereignty
What is the Social Contract Theory? when the people gave up their freedom to gain protection from the Government
Who are the founders of the Contract Theory? John Locke and Thomas Hobbs
Democracy form of Government in which the supreme authority rests with the people
Federalism system of Government which powers are divided between central, national, and local Governments
What are the major ideas of the Declaration of Independence? all men are created equal and we all have natural rights
What is the structure of the Articles of Confederation? Congress is unicameral; no executive or judicial branch; has legislative branch
What is the Connecticut Compromise? with it, it was agreed that Congress should be composed of two houses and there should be equal representation of all the states
Popular Sovereignty the Government's power comes from the people
Checks and Balances each branch of Government can check the power of the other branches of Government
Separation of Powers the powers of Government are divided among three branches to prevent abusive power
How is an amendment added to the Constitution? 1st: Proposed by a 2/3 vote in both houses; or proposed by a national convention called by Congress when requested by 2/3 of state legislatures 2nd: Ratified by state legislatures in 3/4 of the States; or ratified by conventions held in 3/4 of the stat
What are the checks the Congress has on the Courts? impeach judges if they are criminal, approves amendments
What are the checks that Congress has on the Executive Branch? veto override with a 2/3 vote in both houses, impeach, control spending, ratify all treaties (ONLY IN THE SENATE!)
Expressed Powers delegated powers listed in the Constitution that come from the National Government
Implied Powers delegated powers that come from the Necessary Proper Clause (Elastic Clause)
Inherent Powers delegated natural powers that all Governments have
Reserved Powers powers that belong to the state from the 10th amendment
Full Faith and Credit Clause states must provide full faith and credit to all public acts, rewards, and judicial proceedings of every state
Extradition when states return fugitives to the state where their crime was committed
Political Party group of persons who seek to control Government through the winning of elections and holding of public office
15th Amendment rights of citizens cannot be denied on basis of race, color, or previous condition of servitude
19th Amendment right of citizens to vote cannot be denied on the basis of gender
24th Amendment citizens have the rights to vote in any primary election
26th Amendment right for people 18 and older to vote
Who could originally vote in the U.S.? adult white males over 21 that were property owners
What are the current voting requirements in America? at least 18, registered, and live in the state that you vote in
How does an open primary differ from a closed primary? in an open primary, any qualified voter can take part in an election. in a closed primary, only declared party members can vote
Interest Group private organizations whose members share certain views
Propaganda persuasion aimed at influencing particular beliefs
Lobbying activities by which group pressures are brought to bear on legislators
What are the qualifications of the Senate? 100 people in it, must be at least 30 years old, must have a nine year residency, live in state/district you govern
What are the qualifications of the House? 935 people in it, must be at least 25 years old, must have a seven year residency, live in state you govern
Constituency the people and interests than an elected official represents
17th Amendment Senate must be composed of two senators from each state
Who has the power to declare war? Congress
Which house is the lower house of Congress? the House of Representatives
How are Presidential ties resolved? the House picks the President. for Vice President, the Senate picks a new one
What is the process of Impeachment? a majority vote of the House; conviction requires a 2/3 vote in Senate
Seniority Rule provides that the most important posts, on both the formal and party organization, will be held by those party members with the longest records of service in Congress
Filibuster an attempt to "talk a bill to death"
Cloture a limiting debate procedure used to stop floor debates (needs a 3/5 vote)
What is the purpose of a Conference Committee? reconciles any differences between the two house's versions of a bill
What is the purpose of a Rules House Committee? grants the dates and times of a proposal
What are the major leadership positions of the Senate? Speaker of the House, Major/Minor Whips
What are the major leadership positions of the House? President of the Senate (Vice President), President pro tempore, Major/Minor Whips
What are the basic steps of a bill becoming a law? 1. introduced to the House/Senate 2. referred to a standing committee 3. floor action 4. conference committee 5. congressional approval 6. presidential action
What are the four actions the President can take on a bill? 1. sign the bill 2. veto 3. pocket veto 4. pass the bill without signing it
How many electoral votes are needed to win the Presidency? 270 votes
How many electors are awarded per state? each state has a number of electors equal to the states representation in Congress
22nd Amendment no person can be elected president for more than two terms (10 years)
25th Amendment in case of removal or death of the President, the VP becomes President
What are the positions in the line of succession to the Presidency down to the Secretary of State? Vice President, Speaker of the House, President pro Tempore of the Senate, Secretary of State
Which branch of Government negotiates treaties? the President, usually acting through the Secretary of State
Spoils System the practice of giving offices and other favors of Government to political supporters and friends/family
What was establised in Marbury v. Madison? judicial review
What are two types of jurisdiction that belong to the Supreme Court? original and appellate
What are the first amendment freedoms? freedom of religion, expression, news+press, assembly, petition
Free Exercise Clause guarantees each person the right to believe whatever they want in matters of religion
What is the purpose of the FCC? to regulate the public airwaves of TV and radio
Amendments 4-8 help the _______? accused
Created by: 1508611702