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Chapter 1 Review

The Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment Key Terms

QuestionAnswer
The Scientific Revolution An era associated primarily with the 16th and 17th centuries. new ideas and knowledge in physics, astronomy, biology, medicine and chemistry transformed medieval and ancient views of nature and laid the foundations for modern science.
Nicolas Copernicus was a Renaissance astronomer and the first person to formulate a comprehensive heliocentric model which displaced the Earth from the center of the universe.
William Harvey was an English physician who was the first person to describe completely and in detail the systemic circulation and properties of blood being pumped to the body by the heart.
Galileo was an Italian physicist, mathematician, astronomer and philosopher who played a major role in the Scientific Revolution. He improved the telescope and consequent astronomical observations.
Johannes Kepler was a German mathematician, astronomer and astrologer. He was a key figure in the 17th century scientific revolution. He is best known for his eponymous laws of planetary motion
Sir Francis Bacon was an English philosopher, statesman, scientist, lawyer, jurist, author and pioneer of the scientific method. His works established and popularized inductive methodologies for scientific inquiry, often called the Baconian method.
Rene Descartes was a French philosopher and writer he also published the Discourse on the Method.
Sir Isaac Newton was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher, alchemist, and theologian. Came up with the three laws of motion
The Age of Enlightenment was an elite cultural movement of intellectuals in 18th century Europe, that sought to mobilize the power of reason in order to reform society and advance knowledge.
John Locke was an English philosopher and physician regarded as one of the most influential of Enlightenment thinkers
Thomas Hobbes was an English philosopher, best known today for his work on political philosophy.
Progress the idea that the world can become increasingly better in terms of science, technology, modernization, liberty, democracy, quality of life, etc.
Deism is a theological position, concerning the relationship between "the Creator" and the natural world, which emerged during the scientific revolution of 17th century Europe and came to exert a powerful influence during the eighteenth century enlightenment.
tolerance is the practice of permitting a thing of which one disapproves
Jean Jacques Rousseau was a major Genevan philosopher, writer, and composer of 18th-century Romanticism. His political philosophy heavily influenced the French Revolution
Mary Wollstonecraft was an eighteenth-century British writer, philosopher, and advocate of women's rights
The Social Contract by Jean-Jacques Rousseau, is the book in which Rousseau theorized about the best way in which to set up a political community in the face of the problems of commercial society which he had already identified in his Discourse on Inequality
The General Will made famous by Jean-Jacques Rousseau, is a concept in political philosophy referring to the desire or interest of a people as a whole
Philosophes were the intellectuals of the 18th century Enlightenment
A Vindication of the Rights of Woman written by the 18th-century British feminist Mary Wollstonecraft, is one of the earliest works of feminist philosophy
Created by: bonibet
 

 



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