Busy. Please wait.
or

show password
Forgot Password?

Don't have an account?  Sign up 
or

Username is available taken
show password

why


Make sure to remember your password. If you forget it there is no way for StudyStack to send you a reset link. You would need to create a new account.
We do not share your email address with others. It is only used to allow you to reset your password. For details read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.


Already a StudyStack user? Log In

Reset Password
Enter the associated with your account, and we'll email you a link to reset your password.
Don't know
Know
remaining cards
Save
0:01
To flip the current card, click it or press the Spacebar key.  To move the current card to one of the three colored boxes, click on the box.  You may also press the UP ARROW key to move the card to the "Know" box, the DOWN ARROW key to move the card to the "Don't know" box, or the RIGHT ARROW key to move the card to the Remaining box.  You may also click on the card displayed in any of the three boxes to bring that card back to the center.

Pass complete!

"Know" box contains:
Time elapsed:
Retries:
restart all cards
share
Embed Code - If you would like this activity on your web page, copy the script below and paste it into your web page.

  Normal Size     Small Size show me how

Important Ppl & org.

TermDefinition
The Grange The Grange, was founded in 1867 to advance methods of agriculture, as well as to promote the social and economic needs of farmers in the United States.
Exodusters Exodusters was a name given to African Americans who migrated from states along the Mississippi River to Kansas in the late nineteenth century, as part of the Exoduster Movement or Exodus of 1879. I
Andrew Carnegie Andrew Carnegie was a Scottish-American industrialist, business magnate, and philanthropist. Carnegie led the expansion of the American steel industry in the late 19th century
John D. Rockefeller John D. Rockefeller was an American oil industry business magnate, industrialist, and philanthropist. He is widely considered the wealthiest American of all time, and the richest person in modern history.
Terence Powderly Terence Powderly was an American labor union leader, politician and attorney, best known as head of the Knights of Labor in the late 1880s.
Samuel Gompers Samuel Gompers was an English-born American labor union leader and a key figure in American labor history. Gompers founded the American Federation of Labor, and served as the organization's president from 1886 to 1894
Eugene Debs Eugene Debs was an American socialist, political activist, trade unionist, one of the founding members of the Industrial Workers of the World, and five times the candidate of the Socialist Party of America for President of the United States.
Knights of Labor The first important national labor organization in the United States, founded in 1868, it originated as a secret organization meant to protect its members from employer retaliations.
American Federation of Labor The American Federation of Labor was a national federation of labor unions in the United States founded in Columbus, Ohio, in December 1886 by an alliance of craft unions disaffected from the Knights of Labor, a national labor union.
Populist Party The Populist movement was a revolt by farmers in the South and Midwest against the Democratic and Republican Parties for ignoring their interests and difficulties.
Upton Sinclair well known and popular in the first half of the 20th century, and he won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1943 wrote The Jungle
Ida B. Wells Ida B. Wells, was an African-American investigative journalist, educator, and an early leader in the Civil Rights Movement.
Susan B Anthony DescriptionSusan B. Anthony was an American social reformer and women's rights activist who played a pivotal role in the women's suffrage movement
WEB DuBois DescriptionWilliam Edward Burghardt Du Bois was an American sociologist, historian, civil rights activist, Pan-Africanist, author, writer and editor. NAACP
William Jennings Bryan DescriptionWilliam Jennings Bryan was an American orator and politician from Nebraska. Beginning in 1896, he emerged as a dominant force in the Democratic Party, standing three times as the party's nominee for President of the United States.
Theodore Roosevelt Theodore Roosevelt Jr. was an American statesman, sportsman, conservationist and writer who served as the 26th president of the United States from 1901 to 1909.
Robert LaFollette DescriptionRobert Marion La Follette Sr. was an American lawyer and politician. He represented Wisconsin in both chambers of Congress and served as the Governor of Wisconsin. Political corruption
Jacob Riis DescriptionJacob August Riis was a Danish-American social reformer, "muckraking" journalist and social documentary photographer
Booker T. Washington DescriptionBooker Taliaferro Washington was an American educator, author, orator, and advisor to presidents of the United States. Between 1890 and 1915, Washington was the dominant leader in the African American community.
Jane Addams DescriptionJane Addams, known as the mother of social work, was a pioneer American settlement activist/reformer, social worker, public philosopher, sociologist, public administrator, protestor, author, and leader in women's suffrage and world peace.
Frances Willard DescriptionFrances Elizabeth Caroline Willard was an American educator, temperance reformer, and women's suffragist. Willard became the national president of Woman's Christian Temperance Union in 1879, and remained president until her death in 1898.
Henry Cabot Lodge DescriptionHenry Cabot Lodge was an American Republican Senator and historian from Massachusetts. A member of the prominent Lodge family, he received his PhD in history from Harvard University.
Alfred Thayer Mahan DescriptionAlfred Thayer Mahan was a United States naval officer and historian, whom John Keegan called "the most important American strategist of the nineteenth century."
Sanford B. Dole Sanford Ballard Dole was a lawyer and jurist in the Hawaiian Islands as a kingdom, protectorate, republic and territory.
Boss tweed an American politician most notable for being the "boss" of Tammany Hall, the Democratic Party political machine that played a major role in the politics of 19th century New York City and State.
NAACP the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, is a civil rights organization founded in 1909 to fight prejudice, lynching, and Jim Crow segregation, and to work for the betterment of "people of color." W. E.B.
William Taft William Howard Taft was the 27th president of the United States and the tenth chief justice of the United States, the only person to have held both offices.
Woodrow Wilson DescriptionThomas Woodrow Wilson was an American statesman, lawyer, and academic who served as the 28th president of the United States from 1913 to 1921
John J. Perishing General of the Armies John Joseph "Black Jack" Pershing (September 13, 1860 .... were nicknamed "The Three Green P's," spending their leisure time hunting and attending Hispanic
American expeditionary force On September 12, 1918, the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) under General John J. Pershing launched their first major offensive in Europe as an independent army. Their successful campaign was a major turning point in the war for the Allies.
Tuskegee Airmen the first African American soldiers to successfully complete their training and enter the Army Air Corps (Army Air Forces). Almost 1000 aviators were produced as America's first African American military pilots.
Flying Tigers American volunteer pilots recruited by Claire L. Chennault, a retired U.S. Army captain, to fight the Japanese in Burma (Myanmar) and China during 1941–42, at a time when Japan’s control over China’s ports
Navajo Code The name code talkers is strongly associated with bilingual Navajo speakers specially recruited during World War II by the US Marine Corps to serve in their standard communications units of the Pacific theater.
Talkers A chat system that people use to talk to each other over the Internet. Dating back to the 1980s, they were a predecessor of instant messaging.
Franklin Roosevelt Often referred to by his initials FDR, was an American statesman and political leader who served as the 32nd president of the United States from 1933 until his death in 1945.
League of Nations an intergovernmental organisation founded on 10 January 1920 as a result of the Paris Peace Conference that ended the First World War.
Clarence Darrow an American lawyer, a leading member of the American Civil Liberties Union, and a prominent advocate for Georgist economic reform.
KKK an American white supremacist hate group. The Klan has existed in three distinct eras at different points in time during the history of the United States.
Vernon Baker was a United States Army first lieutenant who was an infantry company platoon leader during World War II and a paratrooper during the Korean War.
Douglas MacArthur was an American five-star general and Field Marshal of the Philippine Army
Dwight Eisenhower an American army general and statesman who served as the 34th president of the United States from 1953 to 1961.
Harry Truman was the 33rd president of the United States from 1945 to 1953, succeeding upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt after serving as vice president.
American Indian Citizenship Act of 1924 Congress granted citizenship to all Native Americans born in the U.S.
21st Amendment Repeal of 18th amendment. Alcohol is legal to make, sell, and consume again.
22nd Amendment two terms only for presidents
24th Amendment no more poll taxes
26th Amendment if you’re 18 or older you can vote
Marshall Plan an American initiative passed in 1948 to aid Western Europe, in which the United States gave over $12 billion in economic assistance.
Truman Doctrine an American foreign policy whose stated purpose was to counter Soviet geopolitical expansion during the Cold War.
War Powers Act a federal law intended to check the president's power to commit the United States to an armed conflict without the consent of the U.S. Congress.
Gulf of Tonkin Resolution a joint resolution that the United States Congress passed on August 7, 1964, in response to the Gulf of Tonkin incident.
Civil Rights Act of 1964 a landmark civil rights and labor law in the United States that outlaws discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin.
Voting Rights Act of 1965 a landmark piece of federal legislation in the United States that prohibits racial discrimination in voting.
Equal Rights Amendment a proposed amendment to the US Constitution stating that civil rights may not be denied on the basis of one's sex.
USA PATRIOT Act an Act of the U.S. Congress that was signed into law by President George W. Bush on October 26, 2001.
SALT I and SALT II Amidst the Cold War, a series of treaties was issued under the Strategic Arms Limitation Treaty
Title IX (“Title Nine”) a federal civil rights law in the United States of America that was passed as part of the Education Amendments of 1972.
NAFTA an agreement signed by Canada, Mexico, and the United States, creating a trilateral trade bloc in North America.
GI Bill provided educational assistance to servicemembers, veterans, and their dependents.
Created by: Maeciray