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Reconstruction

TermDefinition
13th amendment Amendment in the United States Constitution that abolished slavery and involuntary servitude, except as punishment for a crime.
14th amendment Amendment in the U.S. Constitution, that ratified in 1868, defining national citizenship and forbidding the states to restrict the basic rights of citizens or other persons.
15th amendment Amendment in the United States Constitution that prohibits the federal and state governments from denying a citizen the right to vote based on that citizen's "race, color, or previous condition of servitude".
Freedem's Bureau Formally known as the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands, was established in 1865 by Congress to help millions of former black slaves and poor whites in the South in the aftermath of the Civil War.
Sharecropping Is a form of agriculture in which a landowner allows a tenant to use the land in return for a share of the crops produced on their portion of land.
Scalawags Were the white Southerners in the U.S who supported Reconstruction and the Republican Party, after the American Civil War.
Carpetbaggers Was any person from the Northern United States who came to the Southern states after the American Civil War and was perceived to be exploiting the local populace.
Black Codes Were laws passed by Southern states in 1865 and 1866 in the United States after the American Civil War with the intent and the effect of restricting African Americans' freedom, and of compelling them to work in a labor economy based on low wages or debt.
Jim Crow laws Were state and local laws that enforced racial segregation in the Southern United States.
Ku Klux Klan ( post civil war) Was one of a number of secret, oath-bound organizations using violence, which included the Southern Cross in New Orleans (1865) and the Knights of the White Camelia (1867) in Louisiana.
Radical Republicans Were a faction of American politicians within the Republican Party of the United States from around 1854 until the end of Reconstruction in 1877.
Literacy tests (for voting) Is a test that determines the qualification of a voter based on his/her his ability to read and write or ability to read and understand any section of the State or Federal Constitution.
Segregation The action or state of setting someone or something apart from other people or things or being set apart.
Plessy vs. Ferguson Was a landmark decision of the U.S. Supreme Court issued in 1896. It upheld the constitutionality of racial segregation laws for public facilities as long as the segregated facilities were equal in quality.
Sand Creek Massacre On November 29, 1864, seven hundred members of the Colorado Territory militia embarked on an attack of Cheyenne and Arapaho Indian villages. The militia was led by U.S. Army Col. John Chivington, a Methodist preacher, as well as a freemason.
Custer's last stand On the morning of June 25, 1876, Lieutenant Colonel George A. Custer and the 7th Cavalry charged into battle against Lakota Sioux and Northern Cheyenne Indians. ... "Custer's Last Charge."
Barbed Wire The first patent in the United States for barbed wire was issued in 1867 to Lucien B. Smith of Kent, Ohio, who is regarded as the inventor, received a patent for the modern invention in 1874 after he made his own modifications to previous versions.
Wounded Knee Located on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in southwestern South Dakota,was the site of two conflicts between North American Indians and representatives of the U.S. government.
Dawes Act Also known as the General Allotment Act or the Dawes Severalty Act of 1887, authorized the President of the United States to survey American Indian tribal land and divide it into allotments for individual Indians.
Homestead Act Signed into law by President Abraham Lincoln on May 20, 1862, the Homestead Act encouraged Western migration by providing settlers 160 acres of public land
PRA/ TRANSFER This statement of policy sets out the approach and expectations of the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA) in relation to transfers of insurance business under Part VII of the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000.
Plains Indians Interior Plains Indians or Indigenous people of the Great Plains and Canadian Prairies are the Native American tribes and First Nation band governments who have traditionally lived on the greater Interior Plains in North America.
Created by: LispyLogan17