Busy. Please wait.
or

show password
Forgot Password?

Don't have an account?  Sign up 
or

Username is available taken
show password

why


Make sure to remember your password. If you forget it there is no way for StudyStack to send you a reset link. You would need to create a new account.
We do not share your email address with others. It is only used to allow you to reset your password. For details read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.


Already a StudyStack user? Log In

Reset Password
Enter the associated with your account, and we'll email you a link to reset your password.
Don't know
Know
remaining cards
Save
0:01
To flip the current card, click it or press the Spacebar key.  To move the current card to one of the three colored boxes, click on the box.  You may also press the UP ARROW key to move the card to the "Know" box, the DOWN ARROW key to move the card to the "Don't know" box, or the RIGHT ARROW key to move the card to the Remaining box.  You may also click on the card displayed in any of the three boxes to bring that card back to the center.

Pass complete!

"Know" box contains:
Time elapsed:
Retries:
restart all cards
share
Embed Code - If you would like this activity on your web page, copy the script below and paste it into your web page.

  Normal Size     Small Size show me how

6865A US History

6865 A CP US History Final Study Guide

TermDefinition
The Compromise of 1850 Senator Henry Clay introduced a series of resolutions on January 29, 1850, in an attempt to seek a compromise and avert a crisis between North and South.
Manifest Destiny Manifest Destiny is a term for the attitude prevalent during the 19th century period of American expansion that the United States not only could, but was destined to, stretch from coast to coast.
The Gold Rush The California Gold Rush (1848–1855) was a period in American History which began on January 24, 1848, when gold was found by James W. Marshall at Sutter's Mill in Coloma, California.
Monroe Doctrine It stated that further efforts by European nations to colonize land or interfere with states in North or South America would be viewed as acts of aggression, requiring U.S. intervention.
Bill Of Rights The Bill of Rights is the collective name for the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution.
Articles of Confederation he Articles of Confederation served as the written document that established the functions of the national government of the United States after it declared independence from Great Britain.
Life in the 1800's Children as young as 6 or 8 years old might work in a mill or factory, they might run errands and make deliveries for a store keeper, they may be apprenticed to a skilled craftsman or woman, or they could be hired out as a servant.
Farm life in the 1920's During the First World War US farmers had made record profits. they had been able to supply Britain and France with food on a regular basis. And farming did not do very well at this time.
Imperialism A policy of extending a country's power and influence through diplomacy or military force.
Gilded Age The Gilded Age in United States history is the late 19th century, from the 1870's to about 1900.
Social Gospel Movement The Social Gospel was a Christian intellectual movement that was most prominent in the early 20th century United States and Canada.
Trail of Tears In 1838 and 1839, as part of Andrew Jackson's Indian removal policy, the Cherokee nation was forced to give up its lands east of the Mississippi River and to migrate to an area in present-day Oklahoma.
Tammany Hall Tammany Hall, also known as the Society of St. Tammany, the Sons of St. Tammany, or the Columbian Order, was a New York City political organization founded in 1786 and incorporated on May 12, 1789, as the Tammany Society.
Political corruption of the 1800's Political machines allowed themselves to be bribed by wealthy business owners and contractors in the late 1800s. The bribery gave away to the rise of gangs, which ruled slums. This lead to gerrymandering and cooping.
Americanization Movement The Americanization movement was a nationwide organized effort in the 1910s to bring millions of recent immigrants into the American cultural system.
Seneca Falls Convention The Seneca Falls Convention was the first women's rights convention.
Age of Enlightenment There is little consensus on the precise beginning of the Age of Enlightenment; the beginning of the 18th century (1701) or the middle of the 17th century (1650) are often used as epochs.
Industrialism An economic and social system based on the development of large-scale industries and marked by the production of large quantities of inexpensive manufactured goods and the concentration of employment in urban factories.
Fourteen Points Fourteen Points is a blueprint for world peace that was to be used for peace negotiations after World War I, elucidated in a January 8, 1918, speech on war aims and peace terms by U.S. President Woodrow Wilson.
Great Compromise The Connecticut Compromise (also known as the Great Compromise of 1787 or Sherman's Compromise) was an agreement that large and small states reached during the Constitutional Convention of 1787
Muckrackers Muckrakers Name given to US journalists and other writers who exposed corruption in politics and business in the early 20th century. The term was first used by Theodore Roosevelt in 1906.
Paparazzi Paparazzi are independent photographers who take pictures of athletes, entertainers, politicians, and other celebrities, typically while going about their usual life routines.
Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln was the 16th President of the United States, serving from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865.
John Locke John Locke was an English philosopher and physician regarded as one of the most influential of Enlightenment thinkers and known as the "Father of Classical Liberalism".
Magna Carta Magna Carta Libertatum (Latin for "the Great Charter of the Liberties"), is a charter agreed by King John of England at Runnymede, near Windsor, on 15 June 1215.
Advantages of the South in the Civil War Defending their homeland gave them a strong reason to fight...Had skills that made them good soldiers...Many of the best officers in the United States were from the South...
Advantages of the North in the Civil War Had almost 4 times as many free citizens...Had many people to grow food and to work in factories making supplies...Had more than 70% of the nation's rail lines....Had a strong navy and a large fleet of private trading ships..
Thomas Jefferson Thomas Jefferson was an American lawyer and Founding Father, and principal author of the Declaration of Independence. He was elected the second Vice President of the United States and the third President.
18th Amendment The Eighteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution effectively established the prohibition of alcoholic beverages in the United States by declaring the production, transport, and sale of alcohol is illegal.
19th Amendment The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits any United States citizen from being denied the right to vote on the basis of sex.
21st Amendment The Twenty-first Amendment to the United States Constitution repealed the Eighteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which had mandated nationwide Prohibition on alcohol on January 17, 1920.
Volstead Act The National Prohibition Act, known informally as the Volstead Act, was enacted to carry out the intent of the Eighteenth Amendment, which established prohibition in the United States.
Scopes Trial The Scopes Trial, formally known as The State of Tennessee v. John Thomas Scopes and commonly referred to as the Scopes Monkey Trial, was an American legal case in 1925.
Sugar Act On April 5, 1764, Parliament passed a modified version of the Sugar and Molasses Act (1733), which was about to expire.
Stamp Act The Stamp Act Congress or First Congress of the American Colonies was a meeting held between October 7 and 25, 1765 in New York City, consisting of representatives from some of the British colonies in North America.
Intolerable Act The Intolerable Acts were the American Patriots' term for a series of punitive laws passed by the British Parliament in 1774 after the Boston Tea party.
Boston Tea Party The Boston Tea Party (initially referred to by John Adams as "the Destruction of the Tea in Boston") was a political protest by the Sons of Liberty in Boston, on December 16, 1773.
Checks and Balances The system of checks and balances is used to keep the government from getting too powerful in one branch. For example, the Executive Branch can veto bills from the Legislative Branch, but the Legislative Branch can override the veto.
"Supreme Law of the Land" This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in pursuance thereof; and all treaties made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the United States, shall be the supreme law of the land.
Reconstruction Reconstruction generally refers to the period in United States history immediately following the Civil War in which the federal government set the conditions that would allow the rebellious Southern states back into the Union.
Rehabilitation To restore to good health or useful life, as through therapy and education: rehabilitate a patient; rehabilitate a prison inmate.
Federalism the federal principle or system of government. "the politics of federalism in Canada".
Trigger that began WW1 The assassination of Austria – Hungary’s heir of the throne, Archduke Franz Ferdinand sparked a war between Austria – Hungary and Serbia, which caused a number of other countries to get involved due to the treaty alliance system.
Music movement in the 1920's The Jazz Age was a period in the 1920s, ending with the Great Depression, in which jazz music and dance styles became popular, mainly in the United States, but also in Britain, France and elsewhere.
Progressive Movement The Progressive Era (1890 - 1920) Progressivism is the term applied to a variety of responses to the economic and social problems rapid industrialization introduced to America.
Main ideas of the Federalist The Federalist (later known as The Federalist Papers) is a collection of 85 articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay promoting the ratification of the United States Constitution.
Harlem Renaissance The Harlem Renaissance was the name given to the cultural, social, and artistic explosion that took place in Harlem between the end of World War I and the middle of the 1930s.
Allied Powers of WW1 The Allies included Britain, France, Russia, Italy and the United States. These countries fought against the Central Powers which included Germany, Austria-Hungary, Ottoman Empire and Bulgaria.
Year for women to gain vote Propertied British women over 30 had the vote in 1918, Dutch women in 1919, and American women won the vote on August 26, 1920 with the passage of the 19th Amendment.
Prohibition Movement Prohibition is the act of prohibiting the manufacturing, storage in barrels, bottles, transportation and sale of alcohol including alcoholic beverages.
Laissez Faire a policy or attitude of letting things take their own course, without interfering.
Robert E. Lee Robert Edward Lee was an American soldier known for commanding the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia in the American Civil War from 1862 until his surrender in 1865.
Created by: coco_miller