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Final Exam flashcard

Flash cards for Final exam study guide

TermDefinition
The Compromise of 1850 A set of laws, passed in the midst of fierce wrangling between groups favoring slavery and groups opposing it, that attempted to give something to both sides.
Manifest Destiny The 19th-century doctrine or belief that the expansion of the US throughout the American continents was both justified and inevitable.
The Gold Rush A rapid movement of people to a newly discovered goldfield. The first major gold rush, to California in 1848–49, was followed by others in the US, Australia (1851–53), South Africa (1884), and Canada (Klondike, 1897–98).
Monroe Doctrine a principle of US policy, originated by President James Monroe in 1823, that any intervention by external powers in the politics of the Americas is a potentially hostile act against the US.
Bill of Rights The first ten amendments to the US Constitution, ratified in 1791 and guaranteeing such rights as the freedoms of speech, assembly, and worship.
Articles of Confederations The original constitution of the US, ratified in 1781, which was replaced by the US Constitution in 1789.
Life in the 1800s A period when children worked in factories and poverty was very high
Farm life in the 1920s Farm Life was hard in the 1920s because there wasn't any electricity or indoor plumbing. Everything was done manually.
Imperialism A policy of extending a country's power and influence through diplomacy or military force.
Gilded Age Spanned the final three decades of the nineteenth century, was one of the most dynamic, contentious, and volatile periods in American history.
Social Gospel Movement The Social Gospel movement is a Protestant Christian intellectual movement that was most prominent in the early 20th century United States and Canada.
Trail of Tears The route along which the United States government forced several tribes of Native Americans, including the Cherokees, Seminoles, Chickasaws, Choctaws, and Creeks, to migrate to reservations west of the Mississippi River in the 1820s, 1830s, and 1840s.
Tammany Hall Tammany Hall, also known as the Society of St. Tammany, the Sons of St. Tammany, or the Columbian Order, was a New York City political organization founded in 1786 and incorporated on May 12, 1789, as the Tammany Society.
Political corruption of the 1800s Many of the people involved with politics were corrupted and bribing individuals for votes, or "taking care" of competition.
Americanization movement The Americanization movement was a nationwide organized effort in the 1910s to bring millions of recent immigrants into the American cultural system.
Seneca Falls Convention The Seneca Falls Convention was the first women's rights convention. It advertised itself as "a convention to discuss the social, civil, and religious condition and rights of woman".
Age of Enlightenment the era from the 1650s or earlier to around the 1776s in which cultural and intellectual forces in Western Europe emphasized reason, analysis and individualism rather than traditional lines of authority.
Industrialization The process in which a society or country (or world) transforms itself from a primarily agricultural society into one based on the manufacturing of goods and services.
Fourteen Points The "Fourteen Points" was a statement given on January 8, 1918 by United States President Woodrow Wilson declaring that World War I was being fought for a moral cause and calling for postwar peace in Europe.
Great Compromise An agreement that large and small states reached during the Constitutional Convention of 1787 that in part defined the legislative structure and representation that each state would have under the United States Constitution.
Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln was the 16th president of the United States, serving from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865.
John Locke John Locke FRS, was an English philosopher and physician regarded as one of the most influential of Enlightenment thinkers and known as the "Father of Classical Liberalism"
Magna Carta A charter of liberties to which the English barons forced King John to give his assent in June 1215 at Runnymede.
Thomas Jefferson Thomas Jefferson was an American Founding Father, the principal author of the Declaration of Independence, and the third President of the United States.
18th Amendment The 18th Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibited the manufacture, sale, transport, import, or export of alcoholic beverages.
19th Amendment 19th amendment guarantees all American women the right to vote.
21st Amendment Constitution repealed the Eighteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which had mandated nationwide Prohibition on alcohol on January 17, 1920.
Sugar Act The Sugar Act, also known as the American Revenue Act or the American Duties Act, was a revenue-raising act passed by the Parliament of Great Britain on April 5, 1764.
Stamp Act An act of the British Parliament in 1756 that exacted revenue from the American colonies by imposing a stamp duty on newspapers and legal and commercial documents.
Intolerable Acts The Intolerable Acts was the American Patriots' name for a series of punitive laws passed by the British Parliament in 1774 after the Boston Tea party.
Boston Tea Party An act of defiance toward the British government by American colonists; it took place in 1773, before the Revolutionary War
Checks and Balances A fundamental principle of American government, guaranteed by the Constitution, whereby each branch of the government
Federal vs. State Powers Based on a broad definition of a basic federalism, there are two or more levels of government that exist within an established territory and govern through common institutions with overlapping or shared powers as prescribed by a constitution.
Federalism The federal principle or system of government.
Trigger that began WWI The first world war began in August 1914. It was directly triggered by the assassination of the Austrian archduke, Franz Ferdinand and his wife, on 28th June 1914 by Bosnian revolutionary, Gavrilo Princip.
Progressive Movement A movement for reform that occurred roughly between 1900 and 1920. Progressives typically held that irresponsible actions by the rich were corrupting both public and private life.
Main ideas of the Federalists Hamilton believed that the future of the country lie in the cities and Jefferson believed that the future of the country lie in the... countryside... farming and what not.
Allied Powers of WWI Alliance between United States, France, and Great Britain during WWI
Prohibition Movement Nationwide prohibition did not begin in the United States until 1920, when the Eighteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution went into effect, and was repealed in 1933
Robert E. Lee Robert Edward Lee was an American soldier best known for commanding the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia in the American Civil War from 1862 until his surrender in 1865.
Created by: Joneszts