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CSET MULTI SUBJ III

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

QuestionAnswer
Bandura, Alber ENVIRONMENT CAUSES BEHAVIOR, BEHAVIOR CAUSES ENVIRONMENT.
Behaviorism theory of animal and human learning that focuses on observable behaviors and ignores psychological activities.
Bruner, Jerome learning is an active process where students’ constructed new ideas and concepts based upon their current/past experiences and knowledge.
Classical Conditioning suggests that behavior is somewhat controlled by association and illustrated after a neutral stimulus accepts the eliciting properties of an unconditioned stimulus through the pairing of some unconditioned stimulus with the neutral stimulus.
Connectionism theory developed by Edward Thorndike. The learning theory that represents the original S-R framework of behavioral psychology suggesting that learning is the result of associations forming between stimuli and responses. These associations or "habits" beco
Constructivism - is a general framework for instruction based upon the study of cognition. Constructivism is based on the belief that children construct meaning from their experiences, and are not just passive receivers of information. Much of the theory is linked to chil
Dewey, John was concerned with how student the classroom environment affected learning.
Erikson, Erik developed the theory of psychosocial development relative to the eight stages of progression toward self-esteem. This theory support components of both Piaget and Vygotsky stages of development theories. Erikson's development of identity continues through
Experiential Learning credited to Carl Rogers who suggested that all human beings have a natural propensity to learn. The role of the teacher is to facilitate learning via: setting a positive classroom climate for learning; clarifying the purposes and rules; organizing and pro
Equilibration mplies that individuals learn through experiences somewhat different from previous experiences. Thus, their mental structure is modified in small steps. Individuals learn best when the new incoming information is slightly different from existing informati
Gardner, Howard s credited with coining the Multiple Intelligences
Glaser, William credited with the concept control theory – a motivation theory developed by that contends that behavior is never caused by a response to an outside stimulus. Instead, the control theory states that behavior is inspired by what a person wants most at any g
Guthrie, E. all learning was a consequence of association between a particular stimulus and response. Simple contiguous (close together in time or space) association of a stimulus and response can lead to a change in behavior. Thus, the role of motivation is to creat
Kohlberg, Lawrence THEORY OF MORAL REASONING.developed the theory suggesting that children proceed through a series of stages during which they refine their concept of justice.
Maslow, Abraham Hierarchy of Human Needs describe his work in the area of self-actualization.
Operant Conditioning oined by B.F. Skinner, is based upon the premise that learning is a function of change in overt behavior. The change in behavior is a result of the student’s response to events (stimuli) occurring in one’s environment. A response produces a consequence su
Pavlov, Ivan P discovered "conditioning" and initially believed that all behavior was reflexive. Pavlov thought that all learning, whether the elicited responses in animals, or of highly conceptual behaviors in humans was due to the mechanisms of classical conditioning.
Piaget, Jean a Swiss biologist and psychologist constructed a model of child development and learning based on the idea that the developing child builds cognitive structures or mental maps, “schemes,” or networked concepts for understanding and responding to physical
Vygotsky, Levis credited with developing the Social Cultural learning model. Vygotsky pointed out that culture is the prime determinant of individual development and humans are the only species to have created culture that helps children develop in the context of its cul
Watson, John B. convinced psychologists that the real explanation of behavior was found in the nervous system, and that the study of the brain would explain the concept of conditioning as it related to behavior change.
EARLY CHILDHOOD 2-6 ARMS LEGS GROW LONGER BOYS TEND TO BE SLIGHTLY TALLER AND HEAVIR THAN GIRL
MIDDLER CHILDHOOG 7-11 GROW 2 INCHES PER YEAR UNTIL 11 FINE MOTOR SKILLS BECOME SIGNIFICANT
ADLOLESCENCE 12-18 GROWTH SPURTS ACCELERATION OF LARGE MOTOR PHYSICAL STRENGHT IN BOYS
ERIKSON STAGES BASIC TRUST VS MISTRUST, AUTONOMY VS SHAME AND DOUBT, INITIATIVE VS GUILT, INDUSTRY VS INFERIORITY, IDENTIFY VS ROLE CONFUSION
KOLBERG PRECONVENTIONAL LEVEL 4-10, CONVENTIONAL LEVER 10-13, POSTCONVERNTIONAL LEVER 12-ADULT
Created by: yessiebravo
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