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Toss Up Questions

QuestionAnswer
Werner von Siemens developed a form of this device that used a pointing needle to convey information. In another form of this device, electric pulses cause the receiver's armature to make clicking noises. What device can use a dot and dash code named for telegraph (do not accept or prompt on “telegram”)
In one story from this country's folklore, a steel-driver dies after winning a race against a steam-powered hammer. Other stories from this country describe a lumberjack who owned a giant blue ox named Babe. What country's folk heroes include John Henry United States of America or U.S.A. (accept any underlined portion)
Pope Leo I met with this ruler in an attempt to prevent him from invading Italy. At the Battle of Châlons, this man's army of nomads was defeated by a coalition of Romans and Visigoths. The “Scourge of God” was a nickname of what 5th-century barbarian, Attila the Hun
After this event, Chris Christie spoke out against John Boehner for not holding a vote on aid for its victims. It tracked from Jamaica to the mid-Atlantic and flooded seven New York City subway tunnels. Name this storm that hit the East Coast in October Hurricane Sandy (or Superstorm Sandy or Frankenstorm)
In some insects, this organ is made of ommatidia. The nautilus possesses the “pinhole” type of this organ. In vertebrates, the interior of this organ contains vitreous humor between the lens and retina. What organ connected to the brain by the optic nerv eyes (accept compound eyes or pinhole eyes)
This poet wrote about a girl's search for Gabriel Lajeunesse in an epic “Tale of Acadie.” This author of Evangeline also wrote about a man who rows “to the Charlestown shore” after arranging the signal “One if by land, and two if by sea.” Name this poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
In French, these entities are nasalized when found before the letters m or n. Gliding ones, which occur when two or more of these entities are found in the same syllable, are also called (*) diphthongs [“dip”-“thongs”]. For 10 points—name these sounds s vowels
Pencil and paper ready. Your answer must be a mixed fraction or decimal. Brenda must divide 6 and one-fifth pounds of fudge equally among 4 friends. By first converting 6 and one-fifth to an improper fraction, she computes (*) —for 10 points—how many p 1 11/20 pounds [“one and eleven-twentieths” or “one and eleven over twenty”] or 1.55 pounds [6 1/5 = 31/5; (31/5)/4 = 31/20 = 1 11/20.]
This king dismissed his finance minister Jacques Necker [zhahk neh-kayr] and called the Estates-General for the first time since 1614. Opponents of his reign stormed the (*) Bastille [bass-STEEL] and later executed his wife Marie Antoinette [ann-twah-“ne Louis XVI [“the 16th”] of France (prompt on “Louis”)
This building's crypt was first proposed in a 1793 design by William Thornton. Charles Bulfinch restored this building, whose Thomas Walter-designed dome is topped by the Statue of (*) Freedom. The National Statuary Hall lies within—for 10 points—what b United States Capitol Building (prompt on “Congress” or “Congressional building” before “Congress”)
This author wrote about a toy who melts into the shape of a heart in “The Steadfast Tin Soldier.” A mole tries to marry a small woman in this author's story (*) “Thumbelina” [“thumb”-buh-LEE-nuh]. For 10 points—what Danish author wrote about a creature Hans Christian Andersen
This is the most common notation used for chemical oxidation numbers and for major arcana cards in a Tarot [TAA-roh] deck. Regnal [REG-null] (*) numbers are expressed in this fashion, as are sporting Olympiads and the release years of movies. For 10 poi Roman numerals (accept Roman numbering and similar answers; accept Roman after “numbering”)
Illuvium accumulates in this substance's B-horizon. It forms through pedogenesis [PEE-doh-“genesis”], and it contains decaying organic matter known as humus [HYOO-muss]. Mixing through bioturbation [“bio”-tur-BAY-shun] by organisms such as (*) worms aff soil (accept topsoil, earth, or dirt)
This state was the site of Sutter's Mill, where James Marshall made an important discovery in 1848. It was where the Donner Party resorted to cannibalism, and where John C. Fremont led the (*) Bear Flag Revolt. For 10 points—name this state, whose gold California (accept California Gold Rush after “rush”)
A character on this TV series once found a “rare Indian egg,” which he sat on to hatch the monitor lizard Mrs. Kipling. Ravi [RAH-vee] Ross is (*) cared for by the title character of—for 10 points—what Disney Channel series that stars Debby Ryan as a Tex Jessie
Mars has been visited by this number of Viking probes, which is also the number of spacecraft in the Voyager program. Mars has this many moons, and there are this many inferior planets that are closer to the (*) Sun than Earth. For 10 points—give this n 2
This state capital lies near the Big Cottonwood Canyon of the Wasatch [WAH-satch] Range. The world's largest genealogical library is in this city, which hosted the 2002 Winter Olympics and was founded by (*) Brigham Young. The Mormon Tabernacle is locat Salt Lake City
In 1989 this nation elected F. W. de Klerk as its president; he went on to release this nation's most famous prisoner, and would share the 1993 Nobel Peace Prize with that man. (*) For 10 points—name this nation in which the end of apartheid [uh-PAHR-“tid (Republic of) South Africa (prompt on “RSA”)
This American city contains an Institute of Arts that houses Pieter Brueghel's [“peter” BROO-gull'z] painting The Wedding Dance. This city, which is the seat of Wayne County, has a baseball team that plays at (*) Comerica [koh-MEH-rih-kuh] Park. For 10 Detroit, Michigan
Buchanan and Fish Town are provincial capitals in this nation, where the Cavalla [kuh-VAH-luh] River forms part of a border with Côte d'Ivoire [“coat” dee-VWAHR]. This country is led by (*) Ellen Sirleaf, Africa's first female president. Monrovia [mahn- (Republic of) Liberia
This man sends a threatening message to a Ku Klux Klan leader in “The Five Orange Pips.” In another work, this man deduces that Sir Charles was frightened to death by a (*) dog painted with phosphorus. The Hound of the Baskervilles is a novel about—for Sherlock Holmes (accept either underlined name)
During this war, the battles of Lundy's Lane and Queenston Heights were fought on the Niagara frontier. Naval impressment was one cause of this war, which led to the burning of (*) Washington, D.C. For 10 points—what war between the U.S. and Britain was War of 1812
When the discriminant in this expression is negative, there are two complex results. That discriminant is the value under the square root after the “plus or minus” in the numerator of this formula. (*) For 10 points—what formula solves a namesake equatio quadratic [kwah-DRAT-ick] formula (accept quadratic equation)
In the second entry of this video game series, one antagonist spends time trapped in a potato battery. The heroine of this series is Chell, a test subject in Aperture [AP-ur-chur] Laboratories, who discovers ”the (*) cake is a lie.” For 10 points—what v Portal (accept Portal 1 or Portal 2)
Created by: praytick