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Art Appreciation voc

Midterm Vocabulary

TermDefinition
aesthetics branch of philosophy that deals with the nature, beauty and meaning of art, and our response to it.
B.C.E. Before the Common Era (B.C.)
C.E. Common Era (A.D.: Anno Domini)
Earth or Land art. Art, generally large in scale, made in a landscape from natural elements found there, such as rocks and dirt. Land art arose during the 1960s as a way to bypass conventional urban exhibition spaces and to make art that could not be sol
impasto from the Italian for “paste,” a thick application of paint.
from the Latin, “remember that you must die”); objects that remind us of our mortality.
megalith a large, massive stone.
New Stone Age
nonobjective descriptive of art that does not represent or otherwise refer to the visible world outside itself. Synonymous with nonrepresentational. Compare abstract, stylized.
Post-Impressionism: from 1885 to 1905. applied to the work of several artists—French or living in France. Although all painted in highly personal styles, the Post-Impressionists were united in rejecting the relative absence of form characteristic of Impressionism. The group included Vincent va
selective perception focusing on the visual information we need for the task at hand and relegating everything else to the background.
still life two-dimensional work in which the subject matter is an arrangement of objects—fruit, flowers, tableware, pottery, and so forth—brought together for their pleasing contrasts of shape, color, and texture. Also, the arrangement of objects itself.
trompe l’oeil French for “fool the eye,” representational art that mimics optical experience so faithfully that it may be mistaken momentarily for reality.
the latter part of the Old Stone Age
fleeting nature of earthly life and happiness
Western tradition art as it has been understood and practiced in Europe and in cultures with their roots in European thought, such as the United States.
abstract Descriptive of art in which the forms of the visual world are purposefully simplified, fragmented, or otherwise distorted. Compare representational, naturalistic, stylized, nonrepresentational.
alla prima Italian for “at first.” In oil painting, the technique of painting directly in opaque colors, as opposed to constructing the image gradually by layering underpainting, opaque colors, and glazes over a detailed drawing. “direct painting” or “wet-on-wet.”
appropriation A Postmodern practice in which one artist reproduces an image created by another artist and claims it as his or her own. In Postmodern thought, appropriation is felt to challenge traditional ideas about authenticity and individuality, the location of mea
Art created according to the belief that the essence of art resides in a motivating idea, and that any physical realization or recording of this idea is secondary. arose during the 1960s as artists tried to move away from producing objects that could be
content What a work of art is about, its meaning.
context The personal, social, cultural, and historical setting in which a work of art was created, received, and interpreted
form 1. The physical appearance of a work of art—its materials, style, and composition. 2. Any identifiable shape or mass, as a “geometric form.”
iconography The identification, description, and interpretation of subject matter in art.
installation An art form in which an entire room or similar space is treated as a work of art to be entered and experienced. More broadly, the placing of a work of art in a specific location, usually for a limited time.
nonobjective Descriptive of art that does not represent or otherwise refer to the visible world outside itself. Synonymous with nonrepresentational. Compare abstract, stylized. (2.20)
nonrepresentational Descriptive of art that does not represent or otherwise refer to the visible world outside itself. Synonymous with nonrepresentational. Compare abstract, stylized. (2.21
outsider best term for a nonprofessionally trained artist.
Italian for “pity” (sadness), the name for a standard subject in Christian art, that of Mary, the mother of Jesus, holding her son after he was taken down from the cross on which he suffered death.
Pop art An art style of the 1960s, deriving its imagery from popular, mass-produced culture. Deliberately mundane, Pop art focused on the overfamiliar objects of daily life to give them new meanings as visual emblems.
representational Descriptive of a work of art that depicts forms in the natural world.
sfumato From the Italian word for “smoke,” a technique of painting in thin glazes to achieve a hazy, cloudy atmosphere, often to represent objects or landscape meant to be perceived as distant from the picture plane.
style A characteristic, or a number of characteristics, that we can identify as constant, recurring, or coherent. In art, the sum of such characteristics associated with a particular artist, group, or culture, or with an artist's work at a specific time.
stylized Descriptive of representational art in which methods for depicting forms have become standardized, and can thus be repeated without further observation of the real-world model. Compare abstract.
subject matter In representational or abstract art, the objects or events depicted.
triptych A composition consisting of three panels side by side, generally hinged in such a way that the outer two panels can close like shutters over the central one
Restricted color scheme using no color, only black and white.
Earth art. Art, generally large in scale, made in a landscape from natural elements, such as rocks and dirt. Land art arose during the 1960s as a way to bypass conventional urban exhibition spaces and to make art that could not be sold as a commodity.
In art, representing a person on horseback.
genre The daily lives of ordinary people considered as subject matter for art. Also, genre painting, painting that takes daily life for its subject. (17.13)
Landscape Art displaying natural scenery such as mountains, valleys, trees, rivers, and forests, especially where the main subject is a wide view – with its elements arranged into a coherent composition.
open color palette The range of colors used by an artist or a group of artists, either generally or in a specific work. An open palette is one in which all colors are permitted.
afterimage An image that persists after the visual stimulus that first produced it has ceased. The mechanics of vision cause an afterimage to appear in the complementary hue of the original stimulus.
analogous harmony The juxtaposition of hues that contain the same color in differing proportions, such as red-violet, pink, and yellow-orange, all of which contain red
chiaroscuro Italian for “light-dark.” In two-dimensional, representational art, the technique of using values to record light and shadow, especially as they provide information about three-dimensional form. See model.
chroma The relative purity or brightness of a color. Also called chroma or saturation
color wheel A circular arrangement of hues used to illustrate a particular color theory or system. The most well-known color wheel uses the spectral hues of the rainbow plus the intermediary hue of red-violet.
complementary colors Hues that intensify each other when juxtaposed and dull each other when mixed (as pigment). On a color wheel, complementary hues are situated directly opposite each other.
contour The perceived edges of a three-dimensional form such as the human body. Contour lines are lines used to indicate these perceived edges in two-dimensional art. (4.4)
cool colors Colors ranged along the blue curve of the color wheel, from green through violet.
hue The “family name” of a color, independent of its particular value or saturation.
intensity The relative purity or brightness of a color. Also called chroma or saturation.
intermediate colors tertiary colors. Colors made by mixing a primary color with a secondary color adjacent to it on the color wheel (for example, yellow and orange).
mass Three-dimensional form, often implying bulk, density, and weight.
monochromatic Having only one color. Descriptive of work in which one hue—perhaps with variations of value and intensity—predominates.
saturation The relative purity or brightness of a color. Also called chroma or saturation.
secondary color A hue created by combining two primary colors, as yellow and blue mixed together yield green. In pigment, the secondary colors are orange, green, and violet.
shade A color darker than a hue's normal value. Maroon is a shade of red.
shape A two-dimensional area having identifiable boundaries, created by lines, color or value changes, or some combination of these. Broadly, form.
stippling A pattern of closely spaced dots or small marks used to create a sense of three-dimensionality on a flat surface, especially in drawing and printmaking. See also cross-hatching, hatching.
Created by: Jlewis8775