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WGU Lit. Poetry

WGU Literature Poetry terms

QuestionAnswer
It is based on both the number of stresses, or accents, and the number of syllables in each line of verse. Accentual-syllabic
A poem that recounts a story, usually a single episode, that was originally intended to be sung. Ballad
These feature simple language, dramatic action, and frequently, but not always, a tragic ending. Ballad
Amour propre: feelings of excessive pride. What is the kind of figure of speech? Conceit
This refers specifically to the choice and phrasing of words suitable to verse. Poetic diction
A long, formal narrative poem with elevated style. Epic
This narrate a story of national importance based on the life and actions of a hero. Frequently the fate of the nation depends upon the hero and his actions. Often the hero is either descended from or protected by the gods. Epic
French for "striding over" Enjambment
This occurs when the sense and/or grammatical structure of a sentence moves from one verse line to the next without a punctuated pause. Enjambment
This is connotative and conveys the richness and complexity of language. Figurative language
This uses figures of speech such as metaphor, simile, and alliteration. In contrast to literal language wherein words are taken in their primary or denotative sense. Figurative language
A unit of rhythm, created by one or more stressed syllables combined with one or more unstressed syllables that make up a line of poetry. Foot
An unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable is... iamb (iambic, adj.)
A stressed syllable followed by an unstressed syllable is... trochee (trochaic, adj.)
A stressed syllable followed by two unstressed syllables is... dactyl (dactylic, adj.)
Two unstressed syllables followed by a stressed syllable is... anapest (anapestic, adj.)
A foot of two successive syllables that are equally or almost equally stressed is... spondee (spondaic, adj.)
A foot of two successive syllables that are equally or almost equally unstressed is... pyrrhic (pyrrhic, adj.)
The basic unit of this consisting of a group of two or three syllables. Meter
What is the process of determining the prevailing foot in a line of poetry, of determining the types and sequence of different feet. Scanning or scansion
A metrical line of poetry consisting of one metrical unit, or a foot. Meter is the rhythm in poetry made by these units of sound created by accented and unaccented syllables. Monometer
A line of poetry consisting of two metrical units, or feet. Meter is the rhythm in poetry made by these units of sound created by accented and unaccented syllables. Dimeter
A metrical line of poetry consisting of three metrical units, or feet. Meter is the rhythm in poetry made by these units of sound created by accented and unaccented syllables. Trimeter
A metrical line of poetry consisting of four metrical units, or feet. Meter is the rhythm in poetry made by these units of sound created by accented and unaccented syllables. Tetrameter
A metrical line of poetry consisting of five metrical units, or feet. Meter is the rhythm in poetry made by these units of sound created by accented and unaccented syllables. Pentameter
A line of poetry consisting of six metrical units, or feet. Meter is the rhythm in poetry made by these units of sound created by accented and unaccented syllables. Hexameter
A line of poetry consisting of seven metrical units, or feet. Meter is the rhythm in poetry made by these units of sound created by accented and unaccented syllables. Heptameter
A metrical line of poetry consisting of eight metrical units, or feet. Meter is the rhythm in poetry made by these units of sound created by accented and unaccented syllables. Octameter
A metrical line of poetry consisting of nine metrical units, or feet. Meter is the rhythm in poetry made by these units of sound created by accented and unaccented syllables. Nonameter
A metrical line of poetry consisting of ten metrical units, or feet. Meter is the rhythm in poetry made by these units of sound created by accented and unaccented syllables. Decameter
The genre or the general type of a literary work (i.e., sonnet, novel, or short story) Form
The way a literary work's component parts are arranged into a shape or structure. Form
Lines of unrhymed verse, almost always in iambic pentameter. Blank Verse
This is a specific type of meter (the rhythms in poetry made by units of sound created by accented and unaccented syllables) with lines made up of ten units, or feet, of an unaccented syllable followed by an accented syllable. Iambic pentameter
This is the meter that most closely resembles the natural patterns of English speech. Blank verse
A form of verse where rhythm is not organized into regular meter. This verse also has irregular line lengths, lacks rhyme schemes, and depends on natural speech rhythms. Also known as "open form." Free Verse
The shortest form of Japanese poetry, constructed in three lines of five, seven, and five syllables respectively. Haiku
The message of this poem usually centers on some aspect of spirituality and provokes an emotional response in the reader. Haiku
This is a five-line poem with a strict form (AABBA), originally popularized in English by Edward Lear, which intends to be witty or humorous, and is sometimes obscene with humorous intent. Limerick
A fourteen line poem, usually in iambic pentameter, with a varied rhyme scheme. Sonnet
This is divided into two main sections, the octave (first eight lines) and the sestet (last six lines). The octave presents a problem or situation which is then resolved or commented on in the sestet. The Petrarchan (Italian)Sonnet
A saying that makes the speaker's point quickly and concisely. Epigram
This is a one stanza poem of eight lines. Its rhyme scheme is ABaAabAB and often all lines are in iambic tetrameter: Triolet
The first, fourth and seventh lines are identical, as are the second and final lines, thereby making the initial and final couplets identical as well. Triolet
A type of poetry, consisting of five tercets and one quatrain, with only two rhymes. Villanelle
Fixed form consisting of 6 6-line (usu. unrhymed) stanzas which the end words of 1st stanza recur as end words of following 5 stanzas in a successively rotating order & as the middle & end words of each of the lines of a concluding envoi form of tercet Sestina
Depictions of objects or qualities perceived by the five senses Imagery
The figurative language used to convey abstract ideas concretely Imagery
The depiction of visual objects or scenes. Imagery
This is what makes language and literature concrete and not abstract. Imagery
Generally, rhyme refers to the similar sound in syllables or paired groups of syllables. Internal rhyme
This, which occurs within a line of verse, is less common than end rhyme, which occurs at the end of a line of verse. Internal rhyme
In contemporary usage, this refers to a moderately short (usually 12-30 lines) poem expressing one speaker's emotions and thoughts. Lyric
These poems are not limited to a specific meter or form but are almost always about emotion, frequently concerning themes of love and grief. Lyric
The rhythms in poetry made by units of sound created by accented and unaccented syllables. Meter
Each metrical unit is called... a foot (feet, plural)
This usually consists of one or more stressed syllables with one or more unstressed syllables. a foot
To determine the meter, one first scans a poem to determine what kind of foot is used and then how many feet per line are included.
A unit of poetic meter (or foot) that involves an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable. Iambic
This make up a poem’s meter, or rhythms in poetry made by units of sound created by accented and unaccented syllables. Metrical units (feet)
A common metrical unit of poetry consisting of a stressed syllable followed by an unstressed syllable. Trochaic
A common metrical unit of poetry consisting of two unstressed syllables followed by a stressed syllable. Anapestic (anapest)
A common metrical unit of poetry consisting of a stressed syllable followed by two unstressed syllables. Dactylic (dactyl)
is a “dramatic sketch performed by one actor”. Is an extended, uninterrupted speech or poem by a single person. Monologue
A long utterance by one person (especially one that prevents others from participating in the conversation) Monologue
The narration of an event or story, stressing details of plot, incident, and action. Along with dramatic and lyric verse, it is one of the three main groups of poetry. Narrative poetry
This poem contains more detail than a ballad and is not intended to be sung. A Narrative
A type of lyric or melic verse, usually irregular rather than uniform, generally of considerable length and sometimes continuous, sometimes divided in accordance with transitions of thought and mood in a complexity of stanzaic forms. Ode
it often has varying iambic line lengths with no fixed system of rhyme schemes and is always marked by the rich, intense expression of an elevated thought, often addressed to a praised person or object. Ode
The pattern established by the arrangement of rhymes in a stanza or poem, generally described by using letters of the alphabet to denote the recurrence of rhyming lines Rhyme scheme
The ababbcc of this stanza form. Rhyme Royal
also known as perfect rhyme Exact rhyme
An exact correspondence in the vowel sound and, in words ending in consonants, the sound of the final consonant. Exact rhyme
A difference in the consonant sounds preceding the vowel Exact rhyme
A similarity of accent on the rhyming syllable(s) Exact rhyme
A rhyme in which the sounds are similar, but not exact, as in home and come or close and lose. Eye rhyme
Most near rhymes are types of ________. consonance
A rhyme occurring in the terminating word or syllable of one line of poetry with that of another line, as opposed to internal rhyme. End rhyme
approximate rhyme, off rhyme, imperfect rhyme, or half rhyme are also called... slant rhyme
Days, haze is what kind of rhyme Exact rhyme
Ribbed, robbed is what kind of rhyme Slant rhyme
Though, tough is what kind of rhyme Eye rhyme
Rhyming words that seem to rhyme when written down as text because parts of them are spelled identically, but which are pronounced differently from each other in modern English. Eye rhyme
Rhymes created out of words with similar but not identical sounds. Slant rhyme
The analysis and graphic display of a line's rhythm performed by scanning the line to determine its metrical categorization as a way of describing the rhythmical pattern of a poem. Scansion
This will also show the variations in the meter and the deviations from it, if there are any. Scansion
A type of verse distinguished primarily by the syllable count, i.e., the number of syllables in each line, rather than by the rhythmical arrangement of accents or time quantities. Syllabic verse
This has two main parts: an octave (eight lines) with a rhyme scheme of abba abba followed by a sestet (six lines) with a rhyme scheme of cde cde (or sometimes cdc cdc). Italian (Petrarchan) sonnet
This sonnet usually uses the octave to state or describe a problem and the sestet to resolve it. The Italian
This has three quatrains (4 lines) and a concluding couplet (two lines) with an abab cdcd efef gg rhyme scheme. English (Shakespearean)
The sestets describe a problem or situation that is repeated in each sestet with some variation; the remaining couplet offers a summary, usually with a turn of thought. English (Shakespearean)
This has three quatrains (4 lines) and a concluding couplet (two lines) with an offers a variant rhyme scheme of abab bcbc cdcd ee. Spenserian sonnet
A grouping of verse lines often (but not always) with a common rhyme scheme, metrical pattern, or line length. Stanza
This is determined by its number of lines, number of metrical feet per line, and the meter and rhyme. A stanza pattern (also known as Stave)
Two rhymed lines is called... Couplet
Three lines with the same rhyme. It typically rhymes in an AAA or ABA pattern. A complete poem of just three lines. It can be either rhymed or unrhymed. There is no specific meter. This is called... Tercet
Uses the rhyme scheme a,a,a with no specific meter is called... Triplet
4 lines with varying rhyme schemes is called... Quatrain
Six rhymed verse lines is called... Sestet
Eight rhymed verse lines is called... Octave
This refers to the accent or emphasis, either strong or weak, given to each syllable in a piece of writing, as determined by conventional pronunciation. Stress
Something that stands for something else or that represents something larger, such as a concept or idea. Symbol
Describe poetry in general Verse
Refer to a single poem Verse
Refer to a stanza Verse
Created by: ldepaepe