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Cinematography

Introduction to Cinematography (Camera Angles, Distances, and Movements)

TermDefinition
Long Shot A camera distance showing an entire object or subject and places it in relation to it's surroundings.
Full Shot A camera distance where the entire subject fills the screen, top to bottom.
Midshot A camera distance that shows the subject from the waist to the top of the head.
Close Up A tightly framed shot (camera distance) on a person or object.
Extreme Close Up A shot (camera distance) that shows just a small part of the subject's face.
Establishing Shot An extreme long shot which is used to convey the place, time, or environment, of a scene about to be shown.
Master Shot Recording of an entire scene from start to finish from an angle that keeps all the action in view. Used as a foundation for other cut-away shots, such as close-ups and other B-Roll footage.
Bird's Eye View A camera angle where the camera is positioned directly above a scene facing straight down. Also known as an "overhead shot."
Worm's Eye View A camera angle where the camera is positioned directly below the person or object, looking up.
Eye Level Shot A camera angle that is located at eye-level with the subject. A neutral shot used when dramatic effect (e.g. importance or strength/weakness) is not desired.
High Angle Shot A camera angle where the camera is positioned above eye level, looking down on the subject. Used to make the subject look weak/powerless or less important.
Low Angle Shot A camera angle where the camera is positioned below eye level, looking up at the subject. Used to make the subject look powerful or more important.
Dutch Tilt A camera angle where the camera is tilted so that on screen, the horizon appears to be tilted. Used to indicate stress, uneasieness, or tension in the subject (e.g. character is drugged or drunk)
Pan A camera movement where the camera swivels left to right from a fixed position (such as a tripod).
Tilt A camera movement where the camera moves up and down on a swivel or tilting device.
Zoom Changing the focal length or magnification of the lens, giving the ILLUSION of moving closer or away from the subject.
Dollying A camera movement where the camera pushes forward or away from the subject.
Tracking A camera movement where the camera moves along with the subject or action.
Crane Shot A camera movement assisted with a Crane or Jib. Used to move the camera view up and away from the actors
Over The Shoulder A camera shot where the camera is positioned behind one subject so the shoulder is visible in the foreground, and another subject is visible in the background.
Cutaway A shot which is used to show a different view of the main action in the scene (B-Roll footage). Used to make a scene more interesting. (e.g. Man walking down road, looking at his watch. Cutaway of close up of watch).
Single (Shot Population) The name of a shot with one performer visible in the frame.
Two-shot (Shot Population) The name of a shot with two performers visible in the frame.
Point-of-View A camera shot that shows what the character is looking at from his viewpoint.
Created by: dtalvi