Busy. Please wait.
or

show password
Forgot Password?

Don't have an account?  Sign up 
or

Username is available taken
show password

why


Make sure to remember your password. If you forget it there is no way for StudyStack to send you a reset link. You would need to create a new account.
We do not share your email address with others. It is only used to allow you to reset your password. For details read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.


Already a StudyStack user? Log In

Reset Password
Enter the associated with your account, and we'll email you a link to reset your password.
Don't know
Know
remaining cards
Save
0:01
To flip the current card, click it or press the Spacebar key.  To move the current card to one of the three colored boxes, click on the box.  You may also press the UP ARROW key to move the card to the "Know" box, the DOWN ARROW key to move the card to the "Don't know" box, or the RIGHT ARROW key to move the card to the Remaining box.  You may also click on the card displayed in any of the three boxes to bring that card back to the center.

Pass complete!

"Know" box contains:
Time elapsed:
Retries:
restart all cards
share
Embed Code - If you would like this activity on your web page, copy the script below and paste it into your web page.

  Normal Size     Small Size show me how

US Civil War

QuestionAnswer
Illinois Democratic Senator candidate for President in 1860. Authored the Kansas-Nebraska Act; which let people vote on the issue of slavery (popular sovereignty) Lost the 1860 elecion Stephen Douglas
Illinois Republican lawyer who was the dark horse candidate for president 1860. Won the presidency despite not being on the ballot in the South Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln's 1st Vice-President Hannibal Hamlin
1st state to secede from the US in December of 1860 South Carolina
The site of the first battle in the Civil War; though no deaths occurred. The South bombarded this US fort before the US supply ship arrived. Fort Sumter (April 12, 1861)
US Colonel had a perfect record from West Point; his father Henry Lighthorse was a general with Washington in the Revolution. He left the Union when his home state Virginia left and became the head general of the South. Robert E. Lee
1st major battle of the Civil War. The Confederacy routed the Union when Thomas Jackson's brigade held the left line at Henry House Hill. This battle proved the war would last longer than thought. 1st Battle of Bull Run (Manassas Creek; July 21, 1861)
Nickname given to Confederate General Thomas Jackson for his role at 1st Bull Run Stonewall Jackson
1st major fight between two ironclad ships. The Confederates raised an old wooden boat, the Merrimack, and fit it with ten guns and iron armor plates. Renaming the Virginia. The US ship was the Monitor. Stalemate. Hampton Roads
Confederate commander Albert Sidney Johnston led a force north from Corinth, MS Ulysses S. Grant, who had just captured Fort Donelson, brought five Union divisions to face him. More than 13,000 Union and 10,000 Confederate soldiers lost their lives. Battle of Shiloh (Pittsburgh Landing in Tennessee; April 6-7, 1862)
Union commander George McClellan devised this plan to capture the Confederate capital at Richmond by sending 110,000 men up the peninsula between the York and James rivers. The campaign was disaster for the Union. Peninsular Campaign (March - July 1862)
1st and only President of the South Jefferson Davis
1st and only Vice-President of the South Alexander Stephens
Lincoln's Secretary of State; former NY Senator who was the frontrunner for the Presidency. He was stabbed the night Lincoln was killed; but survived. He later bought Alaska William H. Seward
This resounding victory by Lee and Jackson pushed Union forces back to D.C. The Union ceded all of Virginia to the Confederacy and marking a low point in the Union effort. 2nd Battle of Bull Run (Manassas Creek, August 29-30, 1862)
Lee planned a northern invasion into Maryland hoping to end the war. Single bloodiest day in the Civil War. McClellan had a large enough force to capture the entire south but didn't use all of his troops. Lincoln soon fired him Battle of Antietam (Sharpsburg; September 17, 1862). (This battle encouraged Lincoln to write and then issue the Emancipation Proclamation)
Union commander Ambrose Burnside (who had replaced McClellan) tried to take the initiative and march toward Richmond. He met Lee's forces, which were well entrenched in the hills behind the town. With a superior position, Lee routed the Union army Battle of Fredericksburg (Marye's Heights, December 13, 1862).
This campaign was launched by Grant to take control of the Mississippi River and cut off the western Confederate states from the east. Grant laid siege to town to force a Confederate surrender. Vicksburg Campaign (April 29 - July 4, 1863)
Victory for the South, but with great cost, as Stonewall Jackson lost his life. Lincoln called on "Fighting Joe" Hooker to command the Union army. Hooker was knocked unconscious and the Union retreated. Chancellorsville (May 1-4, 1863)
This marked both the farthest northward advancement by the Confederacy and the turning point that led to its defeat. George Meade led the Union against Lee. George Pickett led his famous "charge" through open fields, where the Union mowed down 5,000 men Battle of Gettysburg (July 1-3, 1863)
Union General William Rosecrans forced Confederate commander Braxton Bragg out of the city on September 9. Well-developed railroad networks, however, allowed Grant, Hooker, and Sherman to bring reinforcements to bring a Union victory. Chattanooga Campaign (September-November 1863)
The first clash between Grant and Lee, this series of conflicts started with the Battle of the Wilderness. Grant suffered his worst lost at Cold Harbor; but with the entire campaign he severely reduced Confederate strength in a war of attrition. Wilderness Campaign (May 5 - June 12, 1864)
Union General who led a famous march to sea; a scorched earth, total war campaign. He burned Atlanta and marched to Savannah. He ordered his men to twist rails around trees; creating "neckties" William Tecumseh Sherman
After Cold Harbor, Grant moved south to lay siege to a railroad hub. He finally destroyed the Confederate right flank at Five Forks. This resounding defeat led to Lee's surrender at Appomattox Court House one week later, effectively ending the Civil War. Petersburg Campaign (June 1864 - April 1865)
Failed last minute compromise that would have protected slavery in exchange for the union to be preserved. Crittenden's Compromise
Failed peace conference where Lincoln met CSA VP Alexander Stephens on a boat to discuss the end of the war. Hampton Roads Conference
This freed slaves in areas of rebellion January 1, 1863. This did not affect slaves in border states; such as Missouri. Very few slaves were freed; but it symbolized that the North was now fighting to end slavery. Emancipation Proclamation
The regiment was one of the first official African-American units in the United States during the Civil War. 54th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment
Former slave and noted abolitionist who conferenced with Lincoln several times during the war. Frederick Douglass
Lincoln's 2nd Vice-President; a Democratic Senator from Tennessee; he remained loyal to the Union while TN left to join the CSA Andrew Johnson
Documentarian who made a critically-acclaimed documentary on the Civil War for PBS in 1993 Ken Burns
Civil War photographer who captured images from the battlefield for newspapers and also photographed Abraham Lincoln Matthew Brady
Some historians say the Civil War started in 1856 in this territory that saw border ruffians from Missouri destroy Lawrence and John Brown murder 5 slaveowners at Pottawatomie Creek Kansas (Bleeding Kansas)
Abolitionist who believed God called on him to free the slaves. In 1859 he captured the federal arsenal at Harper's Ferry, Virginia with hopes to give weapons to nearby slaves. He was captured by Col. Robert E. Lee and eventually hung for treason. John Brown
Novel that Abraham Lincoln said caused the Civil War Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
Harsh slave law that was reviled in the North. It was a part of Henry Clay's Compromise of 1850. The North received California as a free state. This law was ignored and led to the Underground Railroad Fugitive Slave Act or Law
Former slave who was the Moses for slaves. She led many slaves to freedom through the Underground Railroad Harriet Tubman
Anti-slavery editor of the Liberator. Met and befriended Frederick Douglass; he encouraged Douglass to speak publicly against the horrors of slavery William Lloyd Garrison
This Supreme Court case ruled slaves as property who couldn't sue and that the US had no right to deprive citizens of owning property; making slavery, in theory, legal everywhere. Dred Scott v. Sanford (1857) (Chief Justice was Roger B. Taney)
Assassin who killed Abraham Lincoln at Ford's Theater. He was later captured in a barn and either burned to death or shot to death. He planned a conspiracy to kill Johnson and Seward; but these plans failed. John Wilkes Booth
Lincoln Secretary of War who said upon Lincoln's death: "Now he belongs to the ages" Edwin Stanton
Amendment that officially ended slavery in the US 13th Amendment
Amendment that made former slaves citizens and guaranteed them equal protection under the law 14th Amendment
Amendment that guaranteed African-American men the right to vote 15th Amendment
Period after the war in which the Union army occupied the South Reconstruction (1865-1877)
Terror group, led by former CSA General Nathan Bedford Forrest, that sought to undermine Reconstruction and intimidate freed slaves Ku Klux Klan
1st president to be impeached by violating the Tenure of Office Act. The Radical Republicans in Congress did not like this men's cautious/reluctant views on Reconstruction and African-American rights Andrew Johnson
Nasty name given to Northerners who moved down to the South to profit or be in government during Reconstruction Carpetbaggers
Nasty name given to Southerners who went along with Reconstruction and the North Scalawags
This former Union General became the 18th President. While his presidency had many scandals, he signed many laws protecting the rights of African-Americans and went after the Ku Klux Klan Ulysses S. Grant
This controversial election of Rutherford B. Hayes led to a compromise that saw all Union forces out of the South. With the Union army gone, this unfortunately saw the rise of Jim Crow laws, poll taxes and segregation in the South. 1876 Presidential Election (Compromise of 1877)
Secretary of the Treasury and later Chief Justice appointed by Abraham Lincoln in 1864 Salmon P. Chase
Name given to pro-confederate Missourians who terrorized Union settlements. Jesse and Frank James were member of this group. Quantrill's Raiders (Named after William Quantrill)
Name given to the Civil War by the Confederates War of Northern Aggression. War Between the States
Infamous Prisoner of War camp in the South. Henry Wirz was the only prisoner charged with war crimes in the Civil War due to his running of this prison camp. Andersonville, Georgia
Both Davis and Lincoln suspended a person's right to due process during the civil war. Habeas Corpus
In order to prevent Maryland from seceding, Lincoln imposed military rule in the state. Martial Law
Lincoln's only son who survived into old age. He was, ironically, saved from death, by Edwin Booth, the brother of John Wilkes Booth Robert Todd Lincoln
Lincoln's wife who witnessed her husband's death. She was later institutionalized for her erratic behavior that may have resulted from the death of 3 her sons and her husband Mary Todd Lincoln
This was the highest cause of death in the American Civil War Disease
Government organization that sought to give freed slaves an education and to teach them job skills Freedmen's Bureau
Poet who immortalized Abraham Lincoln's death with the poem, O Captain, My Captain Walt Whitman
The Union general at Antietam; he was fired by Lincoln for failing to pursue Lee's retreating army. He later ran as a Democrat against Lincoln in the 1864 Election; he lost badly. George McClellan
He was the last Civil War veteran who served as President William McKinley
This man's successes in the Deep South led many to push for him to run for president. His response: "If drafted, I will not run; if nominated, I will not accept; if elected, I will not serve." William Tecumseh Sherman
The women that followed this Union General's soldiers around are now named after him Hookers (Joseph Hooker)
Part of Booth's conspiracy, he stabbed Secretary of State William Seward the same night of Lincoln's assassination. He was unsuccessful, though, in killing Seward. Lewis Powell
This German-born man was given the role of killing VP Andrew Johnson by Booth; but he coward out and roamed the streets of DC in a drunken stupor. He was still hung for his involvement with Booth George Atzerodt
Built on an island in 1829, the fort was one of three that the United States maintained in the harbor of Charleston, South Carolina. Fort Sumter (April 12, 1861)
In order to claim true independence from the Union, Jefferson Davis decided that the forts needed to be taken; a Confederate force under P.G.T. Beauregard ordered the small Union garrison, controlled by Major Robert Anderson, to surrender. Fort Sumter (April 12, 1861)
Anderson refused, shots were fired, and the Union commander surrendered two days later, with only one soldier killed. Fort Sumter (April 12, 1861)
The Union made two unsuccessful attempts to recapture the fort with ironclad ships in 1863, but Confederate forces finally abandoned it when they left Charleston in February 1865. Fort Sumter (April 12, 1861)
Fought at a creek near Manassas, Virginia (30 miles west of Washington D.C.), this was the first major showdown of the war. First Bull Run / First Manassas (July 21, 1861)
Beauregard led an army against Union commander Irwin McDowell and received reinforcements from Joseph Johnston's troops (whom Union General Robert Patterson failed to detain). First Bull Run / First Manassas (July 21, 1861)
The Confederacy routed the Union when Thomas Jackson's brigade held the left line at Henry House Hill; this effort earned him the nickname "Stonewall." Congressmen and reporters, who had expected to watch a Union victory, fled in panic back to D.C. First Bull Run / First Manassas (July 21, 1861)
A channel in southeastern Virginia was the site of the first major fight between two ironclad ships. The Confederates raised an old wooden boat, the Merrimack, and fit it with ten guns and iron armor plates. Hampton Roads (March 9, 1862)
Renaming the Virginia, it was captained by Franklin Buchanan. The Union countered by constructing a large oval with a rotating gun, called the Monitor and piloted by John Worden. Hampton Roads (March 9, 1862)
The Virginia tore through Union wooden ships (Cumberland, Congress, Minnesota) but when the Monitor arrived, the two ironclads fought to a stalemate - thus the Union maintained its blockade. Hampton Roads (March 9, 1862)
The South deliberately destroyed the Virginia two months later, while the Monitor sank in a storm off Cape Hatteras in December 1862. Hampton Roads (March 9, 1862)
This was named after a church in Pittsburg Landing, Tennessee (100 miles southwest of Nashville). Confederate commander Albert Sidney Johnston led a force north from Corinth, Mississippi. Shiloh / Pittsburg Landing (April 6-7, 1862)
Ulysses S. Grant, who had just captured Fort Donelson, brought five Union divisions to face him. At first, the South led the attack, but Union troops held the "Hornets' Nest" for hours, killing Johnston in the process. Shiloh / Pittsburg Landing (April 6-7, 1862)
Beauregard took over, but by the second day Northern Generals Don Carlos Buell and Lew Wallace (who wrote Ben-Hur) brought reinforcements, causing the Confederates to retreat. More than 13,000 Union and 10,000 Confederate soldiers lost their lives. Shiloh / Pittsburg Landing (April 6-7, 1862)
Union commander George McClellan devised this plan to capture the Confederate capital at Richmond, Virginia by sending 110,000 men up the peninsula between the York and James rivers. Peninsular Campaign (March - July 1862)
Advised of Northern maneuvers, Southern commander Joseph Johnston detached a force to defend the peninsula. He also sent a small unit (led by Stonewall Jackson) that crushed Union reinforcements in the West. Peninsular Campaign (March - July 1862)
After Johnston was wounded at Seven Pines (June 1), Davis replaced him with Robert E. Lee. Lee concentrated his force north of the Chickahominy River Peninsular Campaign (March - July 1862)
in the Seven Days' Battles (June 25-July 1), the Confederates broke through Union defenses, leading to McClellan's retreat down the James toward Harrison's Landing, and failure of the campaign. Peninsular Campaign (March - July 1862)
This resounding victory by Lee and Jackson pushed Union forces back to Washington, D.C. Second Bull Run / Second Manassas (August 29-30, 1862)
President Lincoln had replaced McClellan with John Pope, who would supposedly be united with the Army of the Potomac, commanded by Henry Halleck. Second Bull Run / Second Manassas (August 29-30, 1862)
Lee maneuvered Jackson's troops behind those of Pope; Jackson detained Pope's men at Manassas while Lee sent James Longstreet to crush Pope's left flank. Second Bull Run / Second Manassas (August 29-30, 1862)
Halleck's army was supposed to land at Aquia, but instead retreated to defend Washington, ceding all of Virginia to the Confederacy and marking a low point in the Union effort. Second Bull Run / Second Manassas (August 29-30, 1862)
The bloodiest day of the Civil War: 12,000 Union men lost their lives, as did 10,000 Confederates. Lee planned a northern invasion into Maryland but a Union soldier discovered those battle plans wrapped around three cigars. Antietam / Sharpsburg (September 17, 1862)
Instead, Lee marched his army toward Sharpsburg Creek. Meanwhile, Jackson's forces captured Harper's Ferry, Virginia, and rushed to reunite with Lee. Antietam / Sharpsburg (September 17, 1862)
McClellan had a large enough force to capture the entire rebel army but did not use all of his troops nor coordinate one solid attack. Antietam / Sharpsburg (September 17, 1862)
actually a series of five skirmishes; in one of them, dubbed "The Bloody Lane," 2000 Union soldiers fell in a few minutes. As it was, Union forces drove the Confederates back across the Potomac. Antietam / Sharpsburg (September 17, 1862)
At this site, about 50 miles south of Washington, Union commander Ambrose Burnside (who had replaced McClellan) tried to take the initiative and cross the Rappahannock River in a march toward Richmond. Fredericksburg / Marye's Heights (December 13, 1862)
He met Lee's forces, which were well entrenched in the hills behind the town. With a superior position, Lee routed the Union army; 13,000 Northern troops fell there, while only 5000 Confederates were killed. Fredericksburg / Marye's Heights (December 13, 1862)
After the battle, Burnside's troops were forced to make "The Mud March" up the Rappahannock, made foul by weather and dead and wounded bodies. Fredericksburg / Marye's Heights (December 13, 1862)
This campaign was launched by Grant to take control of the Mississippi River and cut off the western Confederate states from the east. Vicksburg Campaign (April 29 - July 4, 1863)
Grant ordered regiments led by James McPherson, John McClernand, and William Tecumseh Sherman through bayous west of the Mississippi to Hard Times. Vicksburg Campaign (April 29 - July 4, 1863)
They were up against rebel forces under Joseph Johnston and John Pemberton. Vicksburg Campaign (April 29 - July 4, 1863)
Sherman and McPherson drove Johnston from Jackson, Mississippi on May 14, and the Union scored a victory at Champion's Hill two days later, but could not drive the Southerners out of Vicksburg, so Grant laid siege to the town. Vicksburg Campaign (April 29 - July 4, 1863)
Outnumbered 71,000 to 20,000 and on the brink of starvation, Pemberton finally surrendered his men; Johnston withdrew east. Vicksburg Campaign (April 29 - July 4, 1863)
Victory for the South, but with great cost, as Stonewall Jackson lost his life. Lincoln called on "Fighting Joe" Hooker to command the Union army; Hooker took a force of 134,000 and provoked Lee and Jackson's 60,000 men into battle. Chancellorsville (May 1-4, 1863)
Jackson moved around Hooker and counterattacked the Union flank on May 2. That night, while Jackson was on reconnaissance, his own men mistook him for a Northerner and shot him; he died of pneumonia eight days later. Chancellorsville (May 1-4, 1863)
The following morning, a cannonball blast hit the Chancellor House, knocking Hooker unconscious; Union troops led by John Sedgwick then retreated. Casualties for the North outnumbered those of the South, 17,000 to 13,000. Chancellorsville (May 1-4, 1863)
This marked both the farthest northward advancement by the Confederacy and the turning point that led to its defeat. Lee, along with Longstreet, A.P. Hill, and Richard Ewell, led the southern Pennsylvania attack Gettysburg (July 1-3, 1863)
J.E.B. Stuart was supposed to monitor Union movement with his cavalry but strayed so far east of Gettysburg that his force did not return (exhausted) until the second day. Gettysburg (July 1-3, 1863)
Low on supplies, on the final day Lee ordered an attack on the center; George Pickett led his famous "charge" through open fields, where the Union mowed down one-third of his 15,000 men. The Confederates lost 20,000 and Lee retreated to Virginia. Gettysburg (July 1-3, 1863)
George Meade replaced Hooker as leader of the Union side; Southern forces drove Northerners through the town but could not secure key positions at Cemetery Ridge and Little and Big Round Tops. Gettysburg (July 1-3, 1863)
It began when Union General William Rosecrans forced Confederate commander Braxton Bragg out of the city on September 9. Chattanooga Campaign (September-November 1863)
Only George Thomas (the "Rock of Chickamauga") saved Rosecrans from annihilation. Chattanooga Campaign (September-November 1863)
Well-developed railroad networks, however, allowed Grant, Hooker, and Sherman to bring reinforcements. Chattanooga Campaign (September-November 1863)
On November 24, Hooker took Lookout Mountain in the southwest, in the "Battle Above the Clouds." The next day, Thomas ran right over the Southern force at Missionary Ridge, securing Tennessee for the North. Chattanooga Campaign (September-November 1863)
Ten days later, at Chickamauga (in Georgia), Bragg and Longstreet turned the tables by whipping Rosecrans, forcing him into a siege position at Chattanooga. Chattanooga Campaign (September-November 1863)
The first clash between Grant and Lee, this series of conflicts started with the Battle of the Wilderness (50 miles northwest of Richmond), where Southern leaders A.P. Hill and Ewell held the line, and over 17,000 Northerners fell. Wilderness Campaign (May 5 - June 12, 1864)
The trenches in which much of the fighting took place were similar to those later seen in World War I. Wilderness Campaign (May 5 - June 12, 1864)
At Spotsylvania Court House, Meade assaulted Lee's men, but they repelled Meade at the "Bloody Angle." Wilderness Campaign (May 5 - June 12, 1864)
Advancing within ten miles of Richmond, Grant met Lee at Cold Harbor (June 3); he lost 7,000 men to Lee's 1,500 and withdrew across the James River, but with the entire campaign he severely reduced Confederate strength in a war of attrition. Wilderness Campaign (May 5 - June 12, 1864)
After Cold Harbor, Grant moved south to lay siege to this railroad hub, 25 miles from Richmond. Petersburg Campaign (June 1864 - April 1865)
Grant finally destroyed the Confederate right flank at Five Forks (April 1-2), 14 miles southwest of Petersburg. This resounding defeat led to Lee's surrender to Grant at Appomattox Court House one week later, effectively ending the Civil War. Petersburg Campaign (June 1864 - April 1865)
On July 30, Pennsylvania coal miners detonated four tons of powder in a tunnel underneath the Confederate line; this "Battle of the Crater" killed many defenders. Although the South maintained the city, its supplies ran thin in the winter of 1865. Petersburg Campaign (June 1864 - April 1865)
Created by: Mr_Morman