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Vocab TPODG

Vocabulary on the Picture of Dorian Gray

QuestionAnswer
a figure from Greek mythology, a mortal said to represent the pinnacle of physical beauty and athletic perfection Adonis
coldness, or shivering Ague
heretical Christian belief holding that predestination frees people from morality Antinomianism
a white flower that symbolizes death, as ancient mythology holds that it covers the Elysian fields Asphodel
a priestess of Bacchus, the Roman god of wine ("Dionysus" in Greek), whose worship may take the form of drunken revelry or murderous blood lust Bacchante
a man responsible for driving game into a hunter's line of sight by beating plants and bushes with a stick Beater
a metal-based whitening powder used primarily as theatrical make-up Bismuth
a book listing the names and addresses of important people, such as government officials; like a selective telephone directory Blue-book (or "English Blue-book")
covered carriages used as cabs for the wealthy in Victorian London Broughams
the uneducated, brutish savage enslaved by Prospero in Shakespeare's The Tempest Caliban
a small chest, or strongbox Cassone
meat or fish served in gelatin; a French delicacy Chaudfroid
a broad, rounded cloak worn by priests and other members of the clergy during church processions Cope
a word used amongst members of British high society in Wilde's day to describe a fashionable young man with effeminate affectations Dandy
a figure from Greek mythology, a mortal said to represent the pinnacle of physical beauty and athletic perfection Adonis
coldness, or shivering Ague
heretical Christian belief holding that predestination frees people from morality Antinomianism
a white flower that symbolizes death, as ancient mythology holds that it covers the Elysian fields Asphodel
a priestess of Bacchus, the Roman god of wine ("Dionysus" in Greek), whose worship may take the form of drunken revelry or murderous blood lust Bacchante
a man responsible for driving game into a hunter's line of sight by beating plants and bushes with a stick Beater
a metal-based whitening powder used primarily as theatrical make-up Bismuth
a book listing the names and addresses of important people, such as government officials; like a selective telephone directory Blue-book (or "English Blue-book")
covered carriages used as cabs for the wealthy in Victorian London Broughams
a derogatory term for an intellectual who is doggedly devoted to the theories and ideas of others Doctrinaire
a rich widow Dowager
the French word for boredom Ennui
settled securely; surrounded by Ensconced
the French word for liveliness, spiritedness, or sprightliness Esprit
see "dandy" Fop
a strong, exotic perfume Frangipanni
a man employed by an estate to care for the birds and other animals that are kept for hunting purposes Gamekeeper
a figure from Greek mythology; a beautiful young boy chosen by Zeus to be the cup-bearer of the gods Ganymede
mentioned by Lord Henry in conversation with Basil, it refers to The Grosvenor Gallery, which in Wilde's day was a newer, more progressive venue for art than The Royal Academy Grosvenor
oboe Hautboy
a doctrine from ancient Greece stating that the pursuit of pleasure is life's greatest aim; Lord Henry's form of "new hedonism," a popular term during Wilde's life, was a variation on this idea, holding that the pursuit of new sensations through art takes Hedonism
high, stiff collars worn by fashionable men High Stocks
adoring something excessively, bordering on or exceeding worship Idolatrous
transgressions or sins Iniquities
nineteenth century slang for coach drivers Jarvies
nonchalant, apathetic, and lacking energy; Wilde often uses this word to describe the mannerisms of his characters, especially Lord Henry Languid
flexible; supple Lithe
an ornate style of fashion and furniture named after Louis XV of France Louis-Quinze
a pout or frown Moue
pearl, or mother-of-pearl Nacre
the love of one's own appearance; named for Narcissus, a figure from Greek mythology who fell in love with his reflection in a pond, was drowned when he tried to embrace it, and was transformed into a narcissus flower. Narcissism
a musical composition with a dark, reflective, dreamy atmosphere Nocturne
a tall, rectangular object that tapers to a point at the top Obelisk
a place, generally located in a slum, where opium is bought and smoked, usually along with other illicit activities, such as prostitution and gambling. Opium use was common among artists of the romantic period, and retained its popularity well into Wilde' Opium Den
a true statement that seems to contradict itself Paradox
a French word meaning strewn or speckled Parseme
a French word indicating a synopsis of important facts Precis
a French word referring to a person under the tutelage of a master or mentor; an apprentice Protege
a French word for "living room" that is used to denote a regular social gathering of artists and intellectuals Salon
a highly decorative, fringed ceremonial handkerchief Sudaria
mentioned by Lord Henry in the first chapter, The Academy refers to The Royal Academy of Arts, one of Britain's oldest societies of fine art. The Academy was known for its support of conservative taste at the time of the novel's publication The Academy
a fancy, expensive London hotel The Bristol
a small, covered carriage Victoria
Created by: amv3x3