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bio204.s1.d39

cava bio 204 s1.d39 3.08 Passive Transport

QuestionAnswer
Atom and molecules are always in motion, but in solids, they are held together tightly enough that they can only [...]. Atom and molecules are always in motion, but in solids, they are held together tightly enough that they can only vibrate.
When k12 says that atoms and molecules in the environment (where else would the be!?) are always in motion, it's misleading. Yes, the atoms and molecules in a [...] are technically moving, but they're really just vibrating. When k12 says that atoms and molecules in the environment (where else would the be!?) are always in motion, it's misleading. Yes, the atoms and molecules in a solid are technically moving, but they're really just vibrating.
Because cells are a liquid environment, the particles inside of cells are in constant [...]. Because cells are a liquid environment, the particles inside of cells are in constant motion.
Here's an example of the kind of misleading wording they use in bio texts: "Diffusion is random movement down a concentration gradient". Answer me this. If it's in a direction (down a concentration gradient), then how is it [...]!? Here's an example of the kind of misleading wording they use in bio texts: "Diffusion is random movement down a concentration gradient". Answer me this. If it's in a direction (down a concentration gradient), then how is it random!?
Diffusion is the random movement of particles that *eventually causes them to become diffuse* (evenly spread out). This *looks* like molecules moving in certain [...] (down a concentration gradient), but **that's an illusion**. Diffusion is the random movement of particles that *eventually causes them to become diffuse* (evenly spread out). This *looks* like molecules moving in certain direction (down a concentration gradient), but **that's an illusion**.
Forget the definition K12 gives you for diffusion! Diffusion is when something [...]... that's all! Forget the definition K12 gives you for diffusion! Diffusion is when something spreads out evenly... that's all!
[...] Transport = Any time anything crosses the cell membrane without requiring the cell to do anything (i.e. to expend any energy). Passive Transport = Any time anything crosses the cell membrane without requiring the cell to do anything (i.e. to expend any energy).
If a molecule [-es] (randomly moves) across the membrane of a cell, that's an example of passive transport because the cell didn't have to do anything (it was passive); the molecule just randomly moved on its own. If a molecule diffuses (randomly moves) across the membrane of a cell, that's an example of passive transport because the cell didn't have to do anything (it was passive); the molecule just randomly moved on its own.
Small molecules can usually pass through cell membranes on their own, so they tend to just move in and out of cells [-ly] (diffusion), and since the cell doesn't need to do anything to make this happen, it's a form of passive transport. Small molecules can usually pass through cell membranes on their own, so they tend to just move in and out of cells randomly (diffusion), and since the cell doesn't need to do anything to make this happen, it's a form of passive transport.
Proteins embedded in the cell membrane may help molecules pass through that membrane without requiring any energy from the cell. That process, which relies on proteins but doesn't require any energy from the cell, is called [...] (helped) diffusion. Proteins embedded in the cell membrane may help molecules pass through that membrane without requiring any energy from the cell. That process, which relies on proteins but doesn't require any energy from the cell, is called facilitated (helped) diffusion.
To Facilitate = to [...]. (literally, it means something like to make facile (easy)) To Facilitate = to help. (literally, it means something like to make facile (easy))
in facilitated diffusion sometimes a [...] protein bonds with molecules outside a cell membrane and releases them inside the cell. in facilitated diffusion sometimes a carrier protein bonds with molecules outside a cell membrane and releases them inside the cell.
Another type of membrane protein is an ion channel, It's exactly what it sounds like; a channel (or tunnel) through the cell membrane that certain [-s] can pass through. (K12 over-complicates this for some reason) Another type of membrane protein is an ion channel, It's exactly what it sounds like; a channel (or tunnel) through the cell membrane that certain ions can pass through. (K12 over-complicates this for some reason)
Osmosis is an unnecessary term for the diffusion of [...] across a membrane. Seriously. Why do we need a cryptic term for this? Why can't we just call it what it is: diffusion of [...] through a membrane!? Osmosis is an unnecessary term for the diffusion of water across a membrane. Seriously. Why do we need a cryptic term for this? Why can't we just call it what it is: diffusion of water through a membrane!?
Their small size makes water molecules one of the few types of molecules that can [-ly] move through the phospholipid bilayer, without the aid of carrier proteins or ion channels. Their small size makes water molecules one of the few types of molecules that can passively move through the phospholipid bilayer, without the aid of carrier proteins or ion channels.
For particles that can pass through the cell membrane, its like the cell membrane doesn't even [...]. If they're more concentrated outside the cell, they'll spread out randomly and end up increasing the concentration in the cell. For particles that can pass through the cell membrane, its like the cell membrane doesn't even exist. If they're more concentrated outside the cell, they'll spread out randomly and end up increasing the concentration in the cell.
Created by: mr.shapard