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bio204.s1.d34

cava bio 204 s1.d34 3.02 Cell Structure

QuestionAnswer
In 1665, an English scientist named [...] fashioned his own version of a microscope. With it he examined the bark of a cork tree and saw the remains of a group of cells. In 1665, an English scientist named Robert Hooke fashioned his own version of a microscope. With it he examined the bark of a cork tree and saw the remains of a group of cells.
Hooke called the structures [...] because they reminded him of the small rooms that monks occupy in a monastery... and we still call them that today. Hooke called the structures cells because they reminded him of the small rooms that monks occupy in a monastery... and we still call them that today.
While Hooke was examining cork bark with his microscope, a Dutch scientist named [...] was trying to improve the quality of microscope lenses. In 1674, using a more powerful microscope, [...] observed organisms in pond water. While Hooke was examining cork bark with his microscope, a Dutch scientist named Anton van Leeuwenhoek was trying to improve the quality of microscope lenses. In 1674, using a more powerful microscope, Leeuwenhoek observed organisms in pond water.
Leeuwenhoek drew detailed images of the organisms he observed, which he called "[...]" (at least that's the English translation). It was now clear that cells were far from being the "empty rooms" that Hooke had first observed. Leeuwenhoek drew detailed images of the organisms he observed, which he called "wee beasties" (at least that's the English translation). It was now clear that cells were far from being the "empty rooms" that Hooke had first observed.
Modern cell theory states: 1. All organisms are made of [...] cells. 2. The cell is the basic structure and function of living things. 3. Cells come from other cells. (there's more, but the first 3 are the most important) Modern cell theory states: 1. All organisms are made of one or more cells. 2. The cell is the basic structure and function of living things. 3. Cells come from other cells. (there's more, but the first 3 are the most important)
Modern cell theory states: 1. All organisms are made of one or more cells. 2. The cell is the [...] structure and function of living things. 3. Cells come from other cells. (there's more, but the first 3 are the most important) Modern cell theory states: 1. All organisms are made of one or more cells. 2. The cell is the basic structure and function of living things. 3. Cells come from other cells. (there's more, but the first 3 are the most important)
Modern cell theory states: 1. All organisms are made of one or more cells. 2. The cell is the basic structure and function of living things. 3. Cells come from [...]. (there's more, but the first 3 are the most important) Modern cell theory states: 1. All organisms are made of one or more cells. 2. The cell is the basic structure and function of living things. 3. Cells come from other cells. (there's more, but the first 3 are the most important)
Biologists took the Greek word for 'nucleus' (karyon=nut) and created two categories: 1. [...] cell: (eu= good; karyon=nut) cells that have a nucleus. 2. [...] cells: (pro=before; karyon=nut) cells from before the nucleus; i.e. no nucleus Biologists took the Greek word for 'nucleus' (karyon=nut) and created two categories: 1. Eukaryotic cell: (eu= good; karyon=nut) cells that have a nucleus. 2. Prokaryotic cells: (pro=before; karyon=nut) cells from before the nucleus; i.e. no nucleus
Multicellular organisms are made of [-ic] cells. Multicellular organisms are made of eukaryotic cells.
Bacteria, which are [-ic] cells, have a cell membrane and some interior structures, but they do not have a nucleus or the organelles present in [-ic] cells. Bacteria, which are prokaryotic cells, have a cell membrane and some interior structures, but they do not have a nucleus or the organelles present in eukaryotic cells.
All cells have the same general layout, but [-ic] cells are small and simple. All cells have the same general layout, but prokaryotic cells are small and simple.
The fluid inside a cell is called the [...]. The fluid inside a cell is called the cytosol. (cyto=cell, sol=solution; things dissolved in water)
The cytosol and organelles floating around in the cytosol (but not the nucleus for some reason) make up the cell's [...]. The cytosol and organelles floating around in the cytosol (but not the nucleus for some reason) make up the cell's cytoplasm. (cyto=cell, plasm=mixture).
Most cellular activities occur in the [...]—either in the cytosol or in organelles.... because, DUH!, that's almost the entire cell! The only things that **aren't** part of the [...] are the cell membrane and the nucleus. Most cellular activities occur in the cytoplasm—either in the cytosol or in organelles.... because, DUH!, that's almost the entire cell! The only things that **aren't** part of the cytoplasm are the cell membrane and the nucleus.
Common eukaryotic cell structures: 1. [...] (duh!, 'eukaryotic' means it has a [...]) 2. Endoplasmic Reticulum 3. Ribosomes 4. Mitochondria 5. Chloroplasts (found in plants) Common eukaryotic cell structures: 1. Nucleus (duh!, 'eukaryotic' means it has a nucleus) 2. Endoplasmic Reticulum 3. Ribosomes 4. Mitochondria 5. Chloroplasts (found in plants)
Common eukaryotic cell structures: 1. Nucleus (duh!, 'eukaryotic' means it has a nucleus) 2. [E-] [R-] 3. Ribosomes 4. Mitochondria 5. Chloroplasts (found in plants) Common eukaryotic cell structures: 1. Nucleus (duh!, 'eukaryotic' means it has a nucleus) 2. Endoplasmic Reticulum 3. Ribosomes 4. Mitochondria 5. Chloroplasts (found in plants)
Common eukaryotic cell structures: 1. Nucleus (duh!, 'eukaryotic' means it has a nucleus) 2. Endoplasmic Reticulum 3. [R-] 4. Mitochondria 5. Chloroplasts (found in plants) Common eukaryotic cell structures: 1. Nucleus (duh!, 'eukaryotic' means it has a nucleus) 2. Endoplasmic Reticulum 3. Ribosomes 4. Mitochondria 5. Chloroplasts (found in plants)
Common eukaryotic cell structures: 1. Nucleus (duh!, 'eukaryotic' means it has a nucleus) 2. Endoplasmic Reticulum 3. Ribosomes 4. [M-] 5. Chloroplasts (found in plants) Common eukaryotic cell structures: 1. Nucleus (duh!, 'eukaryotic' means it has a nucleus) 2. Endoplasmic Reticulum 3. Ribosomes 4. Mitochondria 5. Chloroplasts (found in plants)
Common eukaryotic cell structures: 1. Nucleus (duh!, 'eukaryotic' means it has a nucleus) 2. Endoplasmic Reticulum 3. Ribosomes 4. Mitochondria 5. [Ch-] (found in plants) Common eukaryotic cell structures: 1. Nucleus (duh!, 'eukaryotic' means it has a nucleus) 2. Endoplasmic Reticulum 3. Ribosomes 4. Mitochondria 5. Chloroplasts (found in plants)
The nucleus is where the [...] is stored; it's the vault where the master plans are kept. Inside the nucleus, blueprints are printed on RNA and sent out to the Ribosomes. The nucleus is where the DNA is stored; it's the vault where the master plans are kept. Inside the nucleus, blueprints are printed on RNA and sent out to the Ribosomes.
[-s] are sructures made of RNA and protein; they read the blueprints that the messenger RNA brings them and build the proteins out of amino acids. Ribosomes are sructures made of RNA and protein; they read the blueprints that the messenger RNA brings them and build the proteins out of amino acids.
The endoplasmic reticulum is basically a big warehouse where the [...] assemble [...]. The endoplasmic reticulum is basically a big warehouse where the ribosomes assemble proteins.
Mitochondria are specialized organelles that convert energy-storage chemicals such as glucose and fatty acids into [...]. Mitochondria are specialized organelles that convert energy-storage chemicals such as glucose and fatty acids into ATP.
[-s] are special solar-powered organelles found in plants. They turn carbon dioxide and water into small sugars which plants then convert to glucose, fructose, starches, or fats. Chloroplasts are special solar-powered organelles found in plants. They turn carbon dioxide and water into small sugars which plants then convert to glucose, fructose, starches, or fats.
Even though eukaryotic cells share the same overall layout and organelles, they take very different forms because they are structured to perform different functions. Scientists refer to this varied structure as [...] (=made different). Even though eukaryotic cells share the same overall layout and organelles, they take very different forms because they are structured to perform different functions. Scientists refer to this varied structure as differentiated (=made different).
A muscle cell, for example, is packed with [...] because adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is generated in [...] and a muscle needs a lot of ATP to move the bones and body. Fat-storage cells (adipose cells), however, have very few [...]). A muscle cell, for example, is packed with mitochondria because adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is generated in mitochondria and a muscle needs a lot of ATP to move the bones and body. Fat-storage cells (adipose cells), however, have very few mitochondria).
Created by: mr.shapard