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bio204.s1.d13

cava bio 204 s1.d13 2.02 Chemical Bonds

QuestionAnswer
Atoms form bonds by losing, gaining, or sharing [-s]. Atoms form bonds by losing, gaining, or sharing electrons.
When two or more atoms bond together, they form molecules or [-s]. Compounds
Electrons move around the nucleus of an atom in different levels. The electrons in the outer level of an atom are called [...] electrons . Electrons move around the nucleus of an atom in different levels. The electrons in the outer level of an atom are called valence electrons .
Positive and [...] electrical charges attract. Positive and Negative electrical charges attract.
Like electrical charges (positive and positive; negative and negative) [...]. Like electrical charges (positive and positive; negative and negative) repel.
Ionic bonds form between positively and [-ly] charged atoms (Which as we've learned are not called atoms! They're called Ions!). Ionic bonds form between positively and negatively charged atoms (Which as we've learned are not called atoms! They're called Ions!).
Some atoms will play 'tug-of-war' with a pair of electrons. This bonds them together in what we call a '[...]' bond. Some atoms will play 'tug-of-war' with a pair of electrons. This bonds them together in what we call a 'covalent' bond.
Atoms bonded together with covalent bonds are called [-s]. Atoms bonded together with covalent bonds are called molecules.
Ions bonded together with ionic bonds are called [-s]. Ions bonded together with ionic bonds are called salts.
[covalent/ionic] bonds are stronger than [covalent/ionic] bonds. Covalent bonds are stronger than ionic bonds.
In most covalent bonds, the electrons are shared [-ly]... this is famously true in the hydrogen/oxygen bond. In most covalent bonds, the electrons are shared unevenly... this is famously true in the hydrogen/oxygen bond.
[...] bonds are forces of attraction between molecules; not atoms. Hydrogen bonds are forces of attraction between molecules; not atoms. (despite the name, they aren't real bonds)
Hydrogen bonds are weaker than the bonds that hold atoms or ions together, but they are the strongest of the inter-[...] bonds; the bonds between molecules. Hydrogen bonds are weaker than the bonds that hold atoms or ions together, but they are the strongest of the inter-molecular bonds; the bonds between molecules.
Over time, all organized matter—such as the butterfly, tree, car, and jeans—tends to become unorganized. This concept is called [...]... well not REALLY, but it's a good enough analogy for our purposes. Over time, all organized matter—such as the butterfly, tree, car, and jeans—tends to become unorganized. This concept is called entropy... well not REALLY, but it's a good enough analogy for our purposes.
Entropy is NOT ACTUALLY [dis-], but that's a good-enough analogy for our purposes in high-school biology. Entropy is very difficult to understand until you've mastered more chemistry. Entropy is NOT ACTUALLY disorder, but that's a good-enough analogy for our purposes in high-school biology. Entropy is very difficult to understand until you've mastered more chemistry.
A better definition of entropy is the energy of a system that cannot be used to do [...]... a sort of lost, useless energy. A better definition of entropy is the energy of a system that cannot be used to do work... a sort of lost, useless energy.
The second law of thermodynamics states that the [...] of any isolated system always increases... the usable energy (energy available to do work) decreases as energy becomes unusable ([...]). The second law of thermodynamics states that the entropy of any isolated system always increases... the usable energy (energy available to do work) decreases as energy becomes unusable (entropy).
Because of [...], living things require on a ready supply of energy which, on Earth, ultimately comes from either the Sun, or from the heat of hydrothermal vents. Because of entropy, living things requre on a ready supply of energy which, on Earth, ultimately comes from either the Sun, or from the heat of hydrothermal vents.
Created by: mr.shapard