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Circulation (ZG)

SLS Bio12 Circulation (ZG)

TermDefinition
Inferior Vena Cava a large vein carrying deoxygenated blood into the heart. There are two in humans, the inferior vena cava (carrying blood from the lower body)
antibody An antibody, also known as an immunoglobulin, is a large, Y-shaped protein produced mainly by plasma cells that is used by the immune system to neutralize pathogens such as bacteria and viruses.
antigen a toxin or other foreign substance that induces an immune response in the body, especially the production of antibodies.
aorta The aorta is the largest artery in the body. The aorta begins at the top of the left ventricle, the heart's muscular pumping chamber.
arterial duct atrioventricular valve either of two heart valves through which blood flows from the atria to the ventricles; prevents return of blood to the atrium
autonomic nervous system the part of the nervous system responsible for control of the bodily functions not consciously directed, such as breathing, the heartbeat, and digestive processes.
atrioventricular (AV) node The atrioventricular (AV) node is a part of the electrical conduction system of the heart that coordinates the top of the heart. It electrically connects the right atrium and right ventricle.
blood pressure The top number is your systolic blood pressure. (The highest pressure when your heart beats and pushes the blood round your body.)
capillary-tissue fluid exchange Fluid Exchange in Tissues. Blood plasma contains water, ions, nutrient molecules (glucose, amino acids, protein, lipids), and waste molecules.
chordae tendineae The chordae tendineae (tendinous chords), colloquially known as the heart strings, are cord-like tendons that connect the papillary muscles to the tricuspid valve and the mitral valve in the heart.
coronary artery The aorta (the main blood supplier to the body) branches off into two main coronary blood vessels (also called arteries).
coronary vein arises from a union of veins from both surfaces of the cardia of the stomach and an esophageal tributary from the cardiac portion of the esophagus; it runs in the lesser omentum and empties into the portal vein.
diastolic pressure The top number refers to the amount of pressure in your arteries during contraction of your heart muscle.
fetal circulation In animals that give live birth, the fetal circulation is the circulatory system of a fetus.
heart rate A normal resting heart rate for adults ranges from 60 to 100 beats a minute. Generally, a lower heart rate at rest implies more efficient heart function and better cardiovascular fitness.
hypertension abnormally high blood pressure.
iliac artery In human anatomy, the iliac arteries are three arteries located in the region of the ilium in the pelvis:
left atrium Oxygen-rich blood from the lungs enters the left atrium through the pulmonary vein. The blood is then pumped into the left ventricle chamber of the heart through the mitral valve.
left ventricle The left ventricle is one of four chambers of the heart. It is located in the bottom left portion of the heart below the left atrium, separated by the mitral valve.
mesenteric artery arises from the anterior surface of the abdominal aorta, just inferior to the origin of the celiac trunk, and supplies the intestine from the lower part of the duodenum through two-thirds of the transverse colon, as well as the pancreas.
plasma Plasma is the clear, straw-colored liquid portion of blood that remains after red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets and other cellular components are removed.
platelets a small colorless disk-shaped cell fragment without a nucleus, found in large numbers in blood and involved in clotting.
red blood cell Hemoglobin is the protein inside red blood cells that carries oxygen. Red blood cells also remove carbon dioxide from your body, transporting it to the lungs for you to exhale.
renal artery The renal arteries normally arise off the side of the abdominal aorta, immediately below the superior mesenteric artery, and supply the kidneys with blood.
right atrium The right atrium is one of the four chambers of the heart. The heart is comprised of two atria and two ventricles.
right ventricle The right ventricle is the chamber within the heart that is responsible for pumping oxygen-depleted blood to the lungs.
semi-lunar valve The semilunar valves are pocketlike structures attached at the point at which the pulmonary artery and the aorta leave the ventricles.
septum That portion of the septum that separates the two upper chambers (the right and left atria) of the heart is termed the atrial (or interatrial) septum while the portion of the septum that lies between the two lower chambers.
systemic circulation Systemic circulation is the part of the cardiovascular system which carries oxygenated blood away from the heart to the body, and returns deoxygenated blood back to the heart.
systolic pressure The top number refers to the amount of pressure in your arteries during contraction of your heart muscle. This is called systolic pressure.
valve A heart valve normally allows blood to flow in only one direction through the heart.
veins any of the tubes forming part of the blood circulation system of the body, carrying in most cases oxygen-depleted blood toward the heart.
white blood cell White blood cells (WBCs), also called leukocytes or leucocytes, are the cells of the immune system that are involved in protecting the body against both infectious disease and foreign invaders.
Created by: gauvreau