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Principles of Myofac

WVSOM Class of 2012 Principles of Myofascial Release

QuestionAnswer
the continuing palpatory feedback in myofascial release is what? the unwinding that is palpated
what are evoked by the abnormal depolarization of motor end-plates? trigger points
in what method does the operator apply biomechanical loading of soft tissues. Neural reflex modifications are made by stimulation of mechanoreceptors in the fascia: myofascial release
resistant barrier engaged directly with tissue stretching: direct myofascial release
loading occurs in the direction away from restrictive barrier: indirect myofasical release
what is the goal of myofascial release? normalize activity at the motor end-plate
what is the primary structure of collagen? a series of insoluble helical isoproteins with glycine cores
what is the quaternary structure of collagen? the tropocollagen molecule- a helix composed of three collagen monomers
what is the structure of elastin? random coil elastin monomers form extensive networks of lysine cross-linked fibers
what is the function of elastin? Interwoven in varying amounts with collagen fibers to increase tissue flexibility and prevent tissue tearing
what is the structure of ground substance? composed of mucopolysaccharides and glycoproteins
ground substances behaves in what manner? colloidal
what is the function of ground substance? maintains distance between fibers preventing microadhesions, controls access to fibroblast, cushions fibers, maintains extensibility
what is the gross structure of collagen? lysine and hydroxylysine crosslinked rope-like fibers of tropocollagen units
Forms fibrous tissues of high tensile strength Varying isocollagen content provides varying flexibility and fiber composition at different developmental stages is the function of what? collagen
fibroblasts are under what control? neuroendocrine control
what do fibroblasts produce? collagen and ground substance
under pressure, fibroblasts produce and organize collagen how? along the same stress lines as the direction of force
how does dascia adapt to external forces? cross linking of collagen
what are the three substructures of fascia? superficial, deep, and subserous fascia
NEED TO MAKE SLIDES FOR DEEP, SUPERFICIAL, AND SUBSEROUS FASCIA!!!! NEED TO MAKE SLIDES FOR DEEP, SUPERFICIAL, AND SUBSEROUS FASCIA!!!!
NEED TO MAKE SLIDES FOR FASCIA FUNCTION SLIDES 24-26!!! NEED TO MAKE SLIDES FOR FASCIA FUNCTION SLIDES 24-26!!!
a restrictive barrier is engaged for the myofascial tissues; the tissue is loaded with a constant force until tissue release occurs: direct myofascial release
dysfunctional tissues are guided along the path of least resistance (away from the barrier) until free movement is achieved: indirect myofascial release
the limit to motion is what? barrier
limit imposed by anatomic structure (passive) anatomic
limit of active motion? physiologic
functional limit within anatomic range of motion, which abnormally diminishes the physiologic range? restrictive barrier
NEED TO MAKE A SLIDE FOR SLIDE 32!!! NEED TO MAKE A SLIDE FOR SLIDE 32!!!
when a muscle receives an nerve impulse to contract, its antagonists receive, simultaneously, an impulse to relax is what law? sherrington's law
how can you diagnose fascia? myofascial drag
NEED TO DO SLIDES FOR EVERYTHING UP TO SLIDE 25 ON SECOND POWERPOINT!!! NEED TO DO SLIDES FOR EVERYTHING UP TO SLIDE 25 ON SECOND POWERPOINT!!!
Created by: mhassan