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Phil

QuestionAnswer
Paradox of free Will 1. Every action is either free or determined 2. If an action is determined then it is not a free action 3. If your action was not determined then it was not a free action so No action of yours is free
Paradox of free will 2a if an action of yours was determined then things outside of your control- the state of the universe at the first moment of time and the laws of nature guaranteed that you would perform that action
Paradox of free will 2b if things outside of your control guaranteed that you would perform an action, then you were not able to refrain from performing that action
Paradox of free will 2c If you were not able to refrain from performing an action, then you did not have a sufficient amount of control over that action ie it was not a free action
Paradox of free will 2 conclusion if an action of yours was determined then it is not a free action
Paradox of free will 3a of an action of yours was not determined, then there is no explanation for that action
Paradox of free will 3b Paradox of free will 3b If there is no explanation for an action of yours, then that action was just a random occurrence
Paradox of free will 3c If an action of yours was just a random occurrence, then you did not have a suffcient amount of control over that action. ie it was not a free action
Paradox of free will 3 conclusion if an action of yours was not determined then it was not a free action
Paradox an apparently cogent argument for an apparently false conclusion
Free action an action that you have sufficient control over
determinism the thesis that the state of the universe at the first moment of time with the laws of nature there is only one way the future could go
reasons to care about free will without free will there is no responsibility. people might think it's moral intrinsically valuable to make free choice
Darrows response to free will there is no free will therefor the paradox of free will is correct
Compatibilism The thesis that an action can be free and determined at the same time
Libertarianism That some actions are free but none are determined
Can you be libertarian and compatible at the same time? No, because .....
Walter stace compatiblist
Campbell libertarian
Stace's free action acts whose immediate cause are psychological states in the agent
Stace's hard determinist free action free action is determined
Campbell free will only applies to inner acts, moral freedom applies to inner acts
Three things for moral responsibility sole authorship must be an inner act could have acted otherwise
implication for sole author ship no one has control over their heredity and very little control over their environment
If an argument is fallacious, then it has either an unreasonable premise or a weak inference
An intermediate conclusion of an argument, X: A. is offered in support of another statement in X. and B. has another statement in X offered in support of it.
If a statement, S, of an argument, X, has something offered in support of it within X, then S cannot be: a premise
If it is not possible for an argument’s premises to be true and its main conclusion false, then that argument must be: deductively valid
According to the Memory Criterion of personal identity, a person is numerically identical with: memories
Frank Jackson’s thought experiment about Mary is offered in support of: C. the possibility of a person knowing all the physical facts about color vision and not knowing what it’s like to see red.
If property dualism is true, then: mental properties are non-physical/immatetial properties
According to the symmetry property of numerical identity: if a=b the b=a
Which of the following is the main conclusion of the Duplication Objection? the memory criterion is false
X and Y can be qualitatively identical even if X and Y are not numerically identical. true
One and the same thing can be qualitatively different at different times. true
if substance dualism is true, then the soul criterion is also true true
When criticizing arguments for dualism, Paul Churchland is thereby arguing for the falsity of dualism false
According to Cartesian Substance Dualism, souls and bodies can causally interact true
The Memory Criterion implies that you must have one and the same brain over time in order to survive from one time to another false
Paul Churchland rejects both substance dualism and property dualism true
According to the Principle of Bivalence: every statement is true or false
Which of the following sets of words contain premise-indicators? since because for given that
An argument with reasonable premises is guaranteed to be cogent false
fallacy of equivocation when a word's meaning is misunderstood in an argument
Created by: 543707438