Busy. Please wait.
or

show password
Forgot Password?

Don't have an account?  Sign up 
or

Username is available taken
show password

why

Make sure to remember your password. If you forget it there is no way for StudyStack to send you a reset link. You would need to create a new account.

By signing up, I agree to StudyStack's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.


Already a StudyStack user? Log In

Reset Password
Enter the associated with your account, and we'll email you a link to reset your password.

Remove ads
Don't know
Know
remaining cards
Save
0:01
To flip the current card, click it or press the Spacebar key.  To move the current card to one of the three colored boxes, click on the box.  You may also press the UP ARROW key to move the card to the "Know" box, the DOWN ARROW key to move the card to the "Don't know" box, or the RIGHT ARROW key to move the card to the Remaining box.  You may also click on the card displayed in any of the three boxes to bring that card back to the center.

Pass complete!

"Know" box contains:
Time elapsed:
Retries:
restart all cards




share
Embed Code - If you would like this activity on your web page, copy the script below and paste it into your web page.

  Normal Size     Small Size show me how

Columbia Astronomy

Earth, Moon, and Planets

QuestionAnswer
North Celestial Pole (NCP) Point on the celestial sphere defined by the projection of the earth's axis of rotation onto the sky due north. (axis of rotation projected onto celestial sphere due north)
South Celestial Pole (SCP) Point on the celestial sphere defined by the projection of the earth's axis of rotation onto the sky due south (axis of rotation projected onto celestial sphere due south)
celestial equator The great circle on the celestial sphere defined by the projection of the earth's equatorial plane onto the sky
zenith Point directly overhead for any observer
meridian arc of a great circle which intersects the horizon due north, passes through the zenith, and intersects the horizon due south
ecliptic great circle on the celestial sphere defined by the projection of the earth's orbital plane onto the sky (also the path of the sun through the stars as seen by observers on earth)
Describe the rotation of the Earth The earth rotates about an axis which is fixed in space. Sense of rotation given by right-hand rule.
Right-hand rule Place the thumb of your right hand along the axis of rotation with your thumb pointing north. The fingers of your right hand curl in the direction of the earth's rotation
Describe North, South, East, and West as defined by planetary rotation. North = direction of NCP South = direction of SCP East = direction of earth's rotation West = opposite direction of earth's rotation
"North and South are fixed directions in space, East and West are not." North and South are fixed - defined by pointing along the earth's axis of rotation. East and west = in the direction of the earth's rotation and opposite to it. Two observers facing East on opposite sides of the earth, opposite in physical direction.
Apparent motion of the stars as seen from the North Pole. Where are the NCP, SCP, and Celestial Equator? Which stars are always above the horizon? Which are never? Which rise and set? Observer @ north pole will see NCP@ zenith. SCP@ the nadir. Celestial equator on the horizon. Stars north of the c.e. (in the southern c.e.) are always below the horizon. No stars rise and set. Stars above horizon - counter-cl circles about the NCP
Apparent motion of the stars as seen from the South Pole. Where are the NCP, SCP, and Celestial Equator? Which stars are always above the horizon? Which are never? Which rise and set? Observer on S.Pole sees SCP@zenith. NCP invisible (planet in the way)@nadir. C.E. on horizon. Stars in sch are always above horizon. Stars in nch are always below. No stars rise and set. Stars above horizon make clockwise circles around SCP
Apparent motion of the stars as seen from Kyoto, Japan (latitude 35 deg North). Where are the NCP, SCP, and Celestial Equator? Which stars are always above the horizon? Which are never? Which rise and set? Observer in Kyoto will see NCP at elevation of 35deg above horizon due N. SCP@35 deg below horizon due S. C.e intersects horizon due E. crosses meridian at elevation 55 above horizon due S. intersects hroizon due w.
Apparent motion of the stars as seen from the equator. Where are the NCP, SCP, and Celestial Equator? Which stars are always above the horizon? Which are never? Which rise and set? @equator sees NCP on horizon due N.& SCP on horizon due S. CE intersects horizon due E., crosses meridian at zenith, and intersects horizon due W. No stars are always above/below horizon. All stars rise/set. Stars c.wise around SCP, counter around NCP.
Apparent motion of the sun throughout the year from the North Pole NCP directly overhead @zenith at north pole, stars make counter circles around it. Nch is always above the horizon, southern below. CE@horizon. 1/2 ecliptic N of CE is always above, 1/2 S is always below. No rise/set
Apparent motion of the sun throughout the year as seen from the Arctic Circle
Created by: queenofbabble