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NEURO

CCRN

QuestionAnswerRational
What is Kernig's sign? Resistance to leg extension with the hip flexed Indicative of meningeal irritation
What is Chovtek's sign? It is facial spasm caused by tapping the origin of the facial nerve. Indicative of hypocalemia
CISTERNOGRAM SHOWS CSF FLOW
What is triple H therapy? HYPERTENSION, HYPERVOLEMIA, HEMODILUTION To reduce the potention for cerebral artery vasospasm.
What is Cushing triad or reflex? Pt. present with an increase in systolic BP, a drecrease in diastolic BP (WIDENING PULSE PRESSURE)and bradycardia. It is a late sign of increase intracranial pressure.
What range should cerebral perfusion pressure be maintained for autoregulation? 50 - 150 mmHg
What is Broca's aphasia? It is the inability to express oneself (Motor or expressive aphasia) Caused by a problem in the Broca area of the frontal lobe.
What is Wernicke's aphasia? Sensory or receptive aphasia Caused by problem in the Wernicke's area of the temporal lobe.
What is dysprosody? The lack of inflection during speech
Where is the Broca area located? It is in the frontal lobe The frontal lobe controls voluntary motor functions.
Where is the Wernicke's area located? It is in the temporal lobe. The temporal lobe controls hearing
SUBDURAL HEMATOMA VENOUS BLEED
EPIDURAL HEMATOMA ARTERIAL BLEED
What are A waves in ICP waveforms Spontaneous,Rapid increases in pressure between 50 - 200 mm Hg. That last 5 minutes or more. A waves can cause cerebral ischemia. They are the most clinical significant wave form. Immediate intervention is necessary.
What is racoon eyes? Indication of basilar skull fracture involving the anterior fossa
What is the first sign of UNCAL HERNIATION? unilateral (ipsilateral) pupil dilation with sluggish reaction. A result of pressure on cranial nerve III
Extracerebral stuctures. Use mnemonic SCALP 1. SKIN 2. CUTANEOUS TISSUE 3. ADIPOSE TISSUE 4. LIGAMENT 5.PERICRANIUM
CRANIAL LAYERS MNEMONIC: ED'S A Super Pizza Man 1. EPIDURAL SPACE 2. DURA MATER 3. SUBDURAL SPACE 4. ARACHNOID 5. SUBARACHNOID SPACE 6. PIA MATER 7. MENINGEAL LAYERS
CEREBRUM governs all sensory and motor and learning; analyzes, associates, integrates, and stores information.
FRONTAL LOBE motor function; motor speech area; controls morals, values, emotions, and judgment
PARIETAL LOBE integrates general sensation; governs discrimination; interprets pain, touch, temperature, and pressure.
What are the four lobes of the CEREBRAL CORTEX FRONTAL LOBE, PARIETAL LOBE, TEMPORAL LOBE, OCCIPITAL LOBE
TEMPORAL LOBE Auditory center; sensory speech center
OCCIPITAL LOBE visual area
BASAL GANGLIA CENTRAL MOTOR MOVEMENT
DIENCEPHALON is composed of: THALAMUS, EPITHALAMUS, SUBTHALAMUS, HYPOTHALAMUS
Central cord syndrome (CCS) It is marked by a disproportionately greater impairment of motor function in the upper extremities than in the lower ones, as well as by bladder dysfunction and a variable amount of sensory loss below the level of injury. Central cord syndrome (CCS) most often occurs after a hyperextension injury in an individual with long-standing cervical spondylosis.
Brown Sequard Syndrome Ipsilateral motor loss Contralateral loss of pain and temperature HEMISECTION OF CORD CUT
What is battle sign? bruising of the mastoid Indicative of Basal skull fracture
Created by: nerdismart