Busy. Please wait.
or

show password
Forgot Password?

Don't have an account?  Sign up 
or

Username is available taken
show password

why


Make sure to remember your password. If you forget it there is no way for StudyStack to send you a reset link. You would need to create a new account.
We do not share your email address with others. It is only used to allow you to reset your password. For details read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.


Already a StudyStack user? Log In

Reset Password
Enter the associated with your account, and we'll email you a link to reset your password.
Don't know
Know
remaining cards
Save
0:01
To flip the current card, click it or press the Spacebar key.  To move the current card to one of the three colored boxes, click on the box.  You may also press the UP ARROW key to move the card to the "Know" box, the DOWN ARROW key to move the card to the "Don't know" box, or the RIGHT ARROW key to move the card to the Remaining box.  You may also click on the card displayed in any of the three boxes to bring that card back to the center.

Pass complete!

"Know" box contains:
Time elapsed:
Retries:
restart all cards
share
Embed Code - If you would like this activity on your web page, copy the script below and paste it into your web page.

  Normal Size     Small Size show me how

Senac_L4_Grammar

Grammar of Senac Intensive Intermediate

TopicDefinitionComplement
[1.1] Question Forms (1/3): Yes/No Questions (structure & exemple) auxiliary verb + subject + verb Does he smoke? // Did we win? // Have they arrived
[1.1] Question Forms (2/3): Object Questions (structure & exemple) question word + auxiliary verb + subject + verb Where do you work? // What did she say? // when are they coming?
[1.1] Question Forms (3/3): Subject Questions (structure & exemple) question word + verb + object who wants ice cream? what happened? // who ate the cheese?
[1.2] Simple Present # Present Continuous (1) Something is always or generally true, habits, routines. // E.g. He looks happy // He doesn't look happy // Does he look happy? (2) An active happening at the time of speaking or a temporary activity happening around now. // E.g. We're staying here // We aren't staying here // Are we staying here?
[1.2] Simple Past # Past Continuous (1) Finished actions, events ou situations in the past (2) An action or a situation in progress at a particular time in the past
[1.2] State Verbs They are not usually used in the continuous forms. (1) ATTITUDE VERBS: love, like, want, prefer (2) THINKING VERBS: believe, know, remember, understand, mean, imagine (3) SENSE VERBS: see, hear, sound, seem, appear [...] [...] (4) BELONGING VERBS: own, possess, belong to, have, contain, include. //// Some of them can be used in the continuous forms when they describe actions. E.g. I'm seeing Phil tonight, we're having a party, 'm thinking of going to college.
[1.3] Talking about yourself: Introducing a question # Introducing an option Introducing a question: Could I ask a question? // There are a couple of things I'd like to ask about. // Can I ask you about that? // I have a question. Introducing an option: For me, (the most important thing is)... // I'd have to say... // In my opinion... // One thing I'd like to say is the...
[2.1] Present Perfect # Simple Past (1) TIME UP TO NOW. Actions that happened in your life before now. // These are often general experiences. // It isn't importante exactly when these happened. // We often use "ever" and "never". // [...] [...] To talk about events which happened a short time ago. We often use the adverbs "just", "yet", "already". (2) To talk about a specific event that happened at a specific time.
[2.2] Narrative Tenses (1/3): Simple Past (1) States and actions in the past, often at a specific time. // [...] [...] // When BEFORE or AFTER is used, it's already clear which action comes before the other, so we can use the Simple Past instead of the Past Perfect: She lived in London for 5 years before she moved to NY.
[2.2] Narrative Tenses (2/3): Past Continuous Use Past Continuous to Background information for a story and use Simple Past to main events). // Often the past continuous is interrupted by another action (simple past): I was talking WHEN the phone rang. // We can use conjunctions like AS and WHILE to talk about two actions that were happening at the same time: WHILE I was reading the paper, I watched the women buying vegetables.
[2.2] Narrative Tenses (3/3): Past Perfect Use to make it clear that one action happened before the other.: I didn't have money because i had lost my wallet. // Often use with "thinking verbs": When I got to the school, I realized I'd left my books at home. // [...] [...] // When BEFORE or AFTER is used, it's already clear which action comes before the other, so we can use the Simple Past instead of the Past Perfect: She lived in London for 5 years before she moved to NY.
[2.3] Telling a story (1/2): Beginning the Story # Describing what happened # Ending the Story (1) This happened when... // In the beginning... (3) In the end, ... // Finally, ... (2) Well, ... // Anyway, ... // Before long, ... // So, ... // And, then, all of sudden, ... // The next thing I knew, ...
[2.3] Telling a story (2/2): Questions to keep a story going # Responses to show interest (1) So, what happened? // What did you do? // What happened next? // Really? (2) I don't believe it! // Oh, no. // Oh, dear. // How embarrassing! // That's really funny. // You must be joking. // Yes, I know.
[3.1] The Future (Plans) (1) Present Continuous (2) Be going to (3) Will (4) May/might (1) When arrangements have already been made (2) future plans or intention (3) there is no plan or arrangement (4) you are unsure what the plan is
[3.2] The Future (Predictions) (1) Be going to (2) Will (3) May/might (4) Be likely to (5) Could (1) There is an evidence (2) You usually use "I think" or "I hope" (3) less certain (4) negative: be unlikely to
[3.3] Dealing with Misunderstanding (1/2): Saying (1) Saying you didn't hear something: I didn't catch any of that (2) Saying you didn't understanding someone's question: You've lost me / I don't get what you're saying
[3.3] Dealing with Misunderstanding (2/2): Asking (3) Asking someone to explain something more clearly: What exactly do you mean? / Do you mean to say ...? (4) Asking someone to repeat something: Can you say that again? / Could you repeat the last part/name/thing you said?
[4.1] Obligation: Have to # Don't have to # Must # Mustn't # Should # Shouldn't # May # Mayn't (1) strong external obligation (2) not necessary (3) obligation as personal opinion (4) prohibition (5) advice, suggestion (6) negative advice, suggestion (7) permission (8) negative permission
[4.2] Past habits: Use to & Would When we talk about things that happened in the past but don’t happen anymore we can do it in different ways.: (1) "Used to" + infinitive (2) "would" + active verbs. It's not possible to use with state verbs. (3) past simples - about things that happened only once or for a specific number of time/length of time.
[2.1] Preposition of time: in # on # at (1) IN: bigger, time periods - season, year, month, century, etc. (2) ON: make it smaller: day, week. (3) AT: much more specific: hours, night. (1) morning, 2010, (2) Christmas Day, Easter Day, the 4th of July (3) 12 o'clock, Christmas (the long holiday),
[1.2] Colocattions: do # get # go # take (1) execute (2) becoming, idea of change (3) exercise, becoming (4) transportation, receiving, responsibility
Time Linkers: as soon as # while # during # until # by the time happened (1) immediately after the other thing (2) at the same time (3) at some point in a period of time (4) continuous up to that point and then stops (5) happened previously
[4.2] Extreme adjetives (1/4) (diference with Gradable adjetives) (1) you can have different degrees or levels of that quality. For example, the weather can be a little cold, rather cold, very cold, or extremely cold. (2) is no gradable. The weather can’t be “a little bit freezing” or “very freezing”
[5.1] Comparative: one-syllable adj # two-syllable adj ending in -y # two syllable & longer adj (1.1) +er = cheaper, faster (1.2) ending with CVC double final C = bigger (1.3) ending with -e add -r = larger (2)-y changes to -i +er = easier, friendlier (3) +more/less <adj> than = more important than
[5.1] Superlative: one-syllable adj # two-syllable adj ending in -y # two syllable & longer adj (1.1)the +est = the cheapest, the fastest (1.2) ending with CVC double final C = the biggest (1.3) ending with -e add -st = the largest (2)-y changes to -i + the -est = the easiest, the friendliest (3) +the most/least = the most important
[5.1] Comparative/Superlative: irregular adjetives (1) good - better - the best (2) bad - worse - the worst (3) far - farther/further - the farthest/furthest
[5.1] Ways of Comparing (common expressions): Similar # big difference # small difference (1) It's EXACTLY THE SAME AS the one we had // It's VERY SIMILAR somewhere I lived // He's NOT AS tall AS I expected. (2) It's A LOT/MUCH/FAR MORE beautiful than I imagine (3) It's A LITTLE/A LITTLE BIT/SLIGHTLY smaller than the last apartment I lived in.
[5.1] Using Superlatives (common expressions) (1) It's BY FAR THE MOST delicious meal I've ever eaten (2) t's ONE OF THE MOST beautiful place in the world (3) It's THE THIRD MOST expensive bag on the table (4) (we often use superlatives with a phase begging with IN THE...) She's by far the best student IN THE CLASS.
[5.2] Question tags: rules (1) Affirmative or negative (2) verb to be or other verb (3) verb tense (4) pronoun (5) (1) use the opposite (2) use to be or auxiliary verb according to the item (3) on simple present the verb changes no 3rd of singular (4) use the pronoun in the end of question (5) // Use contractions
[5.3] Polite Requests (1) Could you... carry this bag for me? (2) Could you tell me... the way of the hotel? (3) Do you know... what time the stores open? (4) Would you mind... comING a little bit earlier? __No, of course not, I'm happy to help you.
[5.3] Response to Polite Requests (1) (+) Yes, of course. (2) (depends on) Let me have a look. // I'm not sure (3) (-) I'm afraid, I can't // I'm sorry, I can't (4) (would you mind...) (+) No, of Course not. (+) Yes, I'm sorry. // sure
[5.2] Word Building: Adjetives (1/4) (1) pain (2) mess (3) profit (4) poet (5) use (1)painful (2) messy (3) profitable (4) poetic (5) useless / useful
[5.2] Word Building: Adjetives (2/4) (1) quick (2) biology (3) hope (4) create (5) peace (1) quickly (2) biological (3) hopeful / hopeless(4) creative (5) peaceful /peaceless (6)
[5.2] Word Building: Adjetives (3/4) (1) response (2) thank (3) effect (4) hair (5) homeless (1) responsible (2) thankful / thankless (3) effective (4) hairy (5) home
[5.2] Word Building: Adjetives (4/4) (1) explode (2) love (3) main (4) carre (5) knowledge (1) explosive (2) lovable (3) mainly (4) careless / careful (5) knowledgeable
[5.2] Word Building: Nouns (1/6) (1) compete (2) run (3) employ (4) immigrate (5) weak (6) creative (1) competition (2) running (3) employment (4) immigration (5) weakness (6) creativity
[5.2] Word Building: Nouns (2/6) (1) educate (2) lonely (3) smoke (4) pollute (5) stupid (6) agree (1) education (2) loneliness (3) smoking (4) pollution (5) stupidity (6) agreement
[5.2] Word Building: Nouns (3/6) (1) happy (2) relax (3) instruct (4) sensitive (5) improve (6) laugh (1) happiness (2) relaxation (3) instruction (4) sensitivity (5) improvement (6) laughing
[5.2] Word Building: Nouns (4/6) (1) response (2) depress (3) imagine (4) kind (5) eat (6) entertain (1) responsibility (2) depression (3) imagination (4) kindness (5) eating (6) entertainment
[5.2] Word Building: Nouns (5/6) (1) pay (2) imitate (3) heavy (4) skate (5) informal (6) direct (1) payment (2) imitation (3) heavyness (4) skating (5) informality (6) direction
[5.2] Word Building: Nouns (6/6) (1) achieve (2) quote (3) dance (4) fit (5) promote (6) secure (1)achievement (2) quotation (3) dancing (4) fitness (5) promotion(6) securityn
[6.1] Word Building: Adjetives II (+ed / +ing) (1/5) (1) annoy (2) relax (3) frighten (4) worry (5) embarrasse (1) annoyed / annoying (2) relaxed relaxing (3) frightened / frighting (4) worried / worrying (5) embarrassed / embarrassing
[6.1] Word Building: Adjetives II (+ed / +ing) (2/5) (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (1) (2) (3) (4) (5)
[6.1] Word Building: Adjetives II (+ed / +ing) (3/5) (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (1) (2) (3) (4) (5)
[6.1] Word Building: Adjetives II (+ed / +ing) (4/5) (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (1) (2) (3) (4) (5)
[6.1] Word Building: Adjetives II (+ed / +ing) (5/5) (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (1) (2) (3) (4) (5)
[4.2] Extreme adjetives (2/4) (1) good (2) big (3) tasty (4) cold (1) wonderful, amazing, great (2) enormous, giant, huge (3) delicious (4) freezing
[4.2] Extreme adjetives (3/4) (1) bad (2) small (3) hot (4) tired (1) awful, terrible (2) tiny (3) bolied (4) exausted
[4.2] Extreme adjetives (4/4) (1) angry (2) interesting (3) pretty (4) difficult (1) starving (2) fascinating (3) gourgeous (4) impossible
[6.1] Multi-word verbos (1/X)
[6.1] Real Conditionals: Zero (1/3) Always true, real conditions, general situations. // Form: if/when + simple presente + "," + simple present. // IF & WHEN have the same meaning (1) If plants don't have water, they die. (2) Ice melts when You heat it.
[6.1] Conditionals: 1st (2/3) Real conditional of possible situation. // Form: if/when + simple presente + "," + will/could/might + verb. // Use IF when you are not sure. Use WHEN for situations which you know will happen. // UNLESS is "if not" (1) If I pass my exam, I'll have a party # When I pass my exam, I'll have a party. (2) I'll go straight to the restaurant unless you call me first.
[6.1] Conditionals: Zero # 1st (3/3) (1) If you sit in the sun, you get a sunburn. => A general situation. "You" means anyone or people in general (2) If you sit in the sun, you'll get a sunburn => I'm talking to you (personally) about will happen today.
[6.2] Hypothetical Conditionals: 2nd Unreal or imaginary situation and its consequences. // Form: If + subjunctive + "," + would/could/should clause. // Is common to use expressions "would be able to", "would need" and "would have to". (1) If I were a boy, I'd be a better a man. (2) If she were the President, she'd make a lot of changes. (3) If you passed the test, would you go to the college? (4) Would you help me if I paid you?
[7.1] Presente Perfect: Simple vs Continuous (1/2): Common meanings (1) & (2) for actions/activities that started in the past and continues until now. Ex.: I've studied German for 6 years / I've been studying German for 6 years. // Use FOR, SINCE and HOW LONG HAVE YOU...? with both Often, A little diference (especially for verbs such as live, work, teach, study). Ex.: I've lived here for years (maybe I'm not here anymore) # I've been living here for years (I still live here)
[7.1] Presente Perfect: Simple vs Continuous (2/2): Emphase (1) enphasize the result. // Use with STATE VERBS (2) enphasize the lenght or duration of an activity. // Don't use with STATE VERBS.
[7.2] Present & Past Ability (1/2): Present vs Past (1) Present: Can / am/is/are able to (2) Past: Could / was/were able to
[7.2] Present & Past Ability (2/2); Particular Moment (3) Particular moment: To be able to: She didn't answer her phone, so I was't able to speak to her. (4) Use MANAGE to show that an action is/was difficult: I usually manage to finish my work on time // Do you manage to see the grandchildren regularly?
[Cicle 2] Another / Other / Others (1) Singular. One other. + noun Plural: (2) + noun (3) the complement was said before
Created by: joaonicodemos