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Definitions

QuestionAnswer
EEG frequency band of 8-13 Hz alpha
EEG pattern characterized by alpha frequency activity whic is monotonous and widespread and shows no response to stimulation in a comatose pt alpha coma
EEG pattern characterized by alpha frequency and theta frequency activity which i s monotonous and widespread and shows no response to stimulation in a comatose pt alpha / theta coma
rhythm at 8-13 hz occurring during wakefulness over the posterior regions of the head, generally with higher voltage of the occiptal areas alpha rhythm
the voltage of the EEG waveform or waveform complex measure din mircrovolts amplitude
any waveform in the EEG recording that is not of cerebral origin artifact
EEG activity that is decreased or increased in one hemisphere when compared to the same region in the opposite hemisphere asymmetry
independent or non-simultaneous occurrence in time of EEG waveforms over the two hemispheres asynchrony
reduction of the amplitude of EEG activity resulting from decreased voltage; may be seen on the EEG of a comatose patient during painful stimulation attenuation
the underlying activity of the brain background activity
frequency of the activity seen in the occipital electrodes when the patient is alert background rhythm or background pattern
EEG frequency band of 14 -30 Hz beta
EEG waveforms occurring over both hemispheres bilateral
EEG waveforms that occur at fixed intervals asynchrounsously over both hemispheres BiPDs - bilateral periodic discharges
represents the difference between two EEG scalp electrodes in each channel bipolar montage
EEG waveforms occurring bilaterally at the same time bisynchronous
higher amplitude EEG waveforms seen over a skull defect breach rhythm
a group of EEG waveforms that appears and disappear abruptly and are distinguished from the background activity by difference in frequency, form, and /or amplitude burst
and EEG pattern characterized by bursts of theta and / or delta often intermixed with faster frequencies with intervening periods of relative quiescence or flattening. burst suppression
prolonged (hours, days, or weeks), continuously recorded digital EEG in critically ill patients with altered mental status or with a significant risk for acute brain ischemia cEEG (continuous EEG)
arising from the area of the brain around the central sulcus central
a sequence of two or more EEG waveforms with a distinct form or pattern different from the background activity complex
a focal seizure associated with diminished consciousness or responsiveness complex partial sz
any values/interpretations where delays in reporting may result in serious adverse outcomes for patients; also known as: critical values critical test results
any values/interpretations where delays in reporting may result in serious adverse outcomes for patients; also known as: critical test results critical values
EEG frequency band of less than 4 hertz delta
EEG activity that is widespread and occurring over large areas of the head diffuse
any EEG waves that are below 8 hertz that are widespread and occurring over large areas of the head diffuse slowing
the frequency of the EEG activity that occupies the greatest part of the recording dominant frequency
no EEG activity over 2 microvolts when recorded from scalp electrode pairs 10 or more centimeters apart with electrode impedances under 10,000 Ohms. ECI - electrocerebral inactivity
no EEG activity over 2 microvolts when recorded from scalp electrode pairs 10 or more centimeters apart with electrode impedances under 10,000 Ohms ECS - electrocerebral silence
a measure of the how well the EEG electrode has been applied. High impedances can help to identify problem electrodes. Generally EEG electrode impedances are under 5,000 Ohms. electrode impedance
waveforms characteristic of a seizure are seen on the EEG recording and are not associated with any demonstrable clinical changes in the patient; also known as: nonconvulsive seizure electrographic seizure
distinctive EEG waves or complexes, distinguished from the BG activity, and resembling those recorded in a proportion of human subjects suffering from epileptic disorders, rendered epileptic experimentally. Epileptiform is the preferred term. epileptic discharges
distinctive EEG waves or complexes, distinguished from the background activity, and resembling those recorded in a proportion of human subjects suffering from epileptic disorders and in animals rendered epileptic experimentally epileptiform discharges
distinctive EEG waves or complexes, distinguished from the background activity, and resembling those recorded in a proportion of human subjects suffering from epileptic disorders, rendered epileptic experimentally. Epileptiform is the preferred term. epileptic spikes
distinctive EEG waves or complexes, distinguished from the background activity, and resembling those recorded in a proportion of human subjects suffering from epileptic disorders and in animals rendered epileptic experimentally. epileptiform activity
any EEG activity that is faster than 13 hertz – beta (13 to 30 Hz) and gamma (30 Hz and above Fast activity/fast frequencies
intermittent, rhythmic trains of delta activity in the frontal regions; is a non-specific finding in adult patients FIRDA - frontal intermittent rhythmic delta activity
EEG waveforms seen in a clearly delineated area of the brain usually in a tightly clustered group of electrodes. For example: focal right temporal spike, focal slow wave. focal
how often a changing signal repeats itself. The unit is hertz (Hz) or cycles per second (cps).` frequency
EEG activity that is coming from these electrodes (Fp1, Fp2, F3, F4, F7, F8) frontal
EEG activity that has its highest amplitude in the frontal electrodes. For example: frontally dominant spike and wave activity, frontally dominant delt frontally dominant
EEG frequency band of greater than 30 hertz gamma
EEG waveforms occurring simultaneously in all recording electrodes generalized
EEG waveforms in the theta and/or delta frequency ranges occurring simultaneously in all recording electrodes generalized slowing
spike and wave EEG waveforms occurring simultaneously in all recording electrodes generalized spike and wave
caused by tongue movement; glossokinetic artifacts can be seen on the EEG recording when the patient talks and swallows glossokinetic
EEG pattern characterized by generalized and synchronous discharges usually with a relative paucity of intervening background activity. This pattern usually reflects a severe, diffuse cerebral insult as in seen with anoxia. GPEDs - generalized periodic epileptiform discharges
the unit of frequency equal to one cycle per second; abbreviated Hz. For example: 8 hertz alpha activity hertz
a non-specific term indicating that the amplitude seen on the EEG is higher than expected; usually greater than 50 microvolts high amplitude
a non-specific term indicating that the voltage seen on the EEG is higher than expected; usually greater than 50 microvolts high voltage
having the same relative position or structure. For example: C3 and C4 are homologous electrodes. homologous
during the seizure ictal
between seizures interictal
in EEG refers to a measure of the how well the EEG electrode has been applied. High impedances can help to identify problem electrodes. Generally EEG electrode impedances are under 5,000 Ohms. impedance
EEG waves or complexes that occur between seizures and are distinguished from the background activity, and resembling those recorded in a proportion of human subjects suffering from epileptic disorders and in animals rendered epileptic experimentally. interictal epileptiform discharges
an EEG waveform that has no predictability of cadence/rhythm irregular
a normal component of sleep; sharply contoured, high amplitude EEG waveforms followed by a slower component occurring spontaneously and with stimulation. k-complex
occurring only over one hemisphere lateralized
a non-specific term indicating that the amplitude seen on the EEG is lower than expected; usually less than 20 microvolts low amplitude
a non-specific term indicating that the voltage seen on the EEG is lower than expected; usually less than 20 microvolts low voltage
a non-specific term indicating the frequencies on the EEG are slightly slower than expected mild slowing
EEG waveforms that are composed of delta, theta, alpha, and beta frequencies superimposed on each othe mixed frequency activity
combinations of multiple pairs of electrodes using available channels which allow for simultaneous recording of EEG activity over the entire scalp montage
7 to 11 Hz arch-shaped waveform seen unilaterally or bilaterally over the central regions, maximal at the C3 and/or C4 electrodes. Mu blocks (attenuates) with movement of the contralateral hand. mu
two or more independent foci are present in the EEG recording electrodes multi focal
waveforms characteristic of a seizure are seen on the EEG recording and are not associated with any demonstrable clinical changes in the patient; also known as: electrographic seizure, subclinical seizure non convulsive seizure
continuous, evolving epileptiform activity, such as spikes, sharp waves, rhythmic frequencies, during which the patient has no apparent clinical symptoms. NCSE can be caused by many different entities and can be difficult to diagnose. NCSE - non convulsive status epilepticus
continuous EEG recording done in real-time with video monitoring and constant observation by an EEG technologist neurotelemetry
EEG waveforms with abrupt onset, rapid attainment of maximum amplitude, and sudden termination that are easily distinguished from the background paroxysmal
theta and delta frequency waveforms with abrupt onset, rapid attainment of maximum amplitude, and sudden termination that are easily distinguished from the background paroxysmal slowing
spike and wave complexes with abrupt onset, rapid attainment of maximum amplitude, and sudden termination that are easily distinguished from the background paroxysmal spike and wave
– EEG pattern characterized by sharp waves or spikes occurring at a regular rate PEDs - periodic epileptiform discharges
EEG waveform or complex of waves that appears at a consistent rate, for example: one every 1 to 4 seconds periodic
EEG patterns that appear at a consistent rate, for example: generalized periodic epileptiform discharges (GPEDs), periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges (PLEDs) periodic patterns
high amplitude, generalized, irregular spike and wave or multiple spike and wave bursts seen during photic stimulation photoparoxysmal response
EEG pattern characterized by sharp waves or spikes occurring at a regular rate; most often seen in acute neurologic conditions, especially cerebral infarctions PLED's - periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges
having multiple shapes; multiple EEG frequencies combine creating complex waveforms polymorphic
a sequence of two or more spikes polyspikes
after a seizure. For example, focal right temporal postictal delta. post ictal
a normal component of sleep seen predominantly in the occipital regions POSTS - possitive occipital sharp transients of sleep
frequency of the activity seen in the occipital electrodes when the patient is alert; also known as background rhythm PDR - posterior dominant rhythm
a distinctive EEG pattern characterized by marked attenuation of all frequencies including delta activity in the ischemic hemisphere RAWOD - regional attenuation without delta
change in the EEG activity following stimulation reactivity
compares the EEG scalp electrode with a reference point somewhere else on the body, perhaps still on the scalp, which is hoped will be neutral or indifferent referential montage
EEG activity consisting of waves of a constant frequency. For example: rhythmic 11 hertz alpha activity. rhythmic
generalized discharges arising from a unilateral cortical focus secondary bilateral synchrony
a clinically bilateral tonic-clonic seizure that on EEG starts in a focal area and quickly spreads to all EEG recording electrodes secondary generalized sz
waves or complexes, distinguished from the background activity, and resembling those recorded in a proportion of human subjects suffering from epileptic disorders and in animals rendered epileptic experimentally. Epileptiform is the preferred term. seizure discharges
EEG waveforms with a duration of greater than 70 milliseconds but less than 200 milliseconds. Another term for sharp wave. sharp transients
an EEG waveform with a duration of greater than 70 milliseconds but less than 200 milliseconds sharp wave
a sharp wave followed by a delta wave sharp wave complex
a localized seizure (isolated to a small area of the brain) with no changes in cognition simple partial seizure
12 to 14 Hz EEG waveforms with maximal amplitude over the central regions seen during sleep sleep spindles
EEG waves that are below 8 hertz – theta (4 to 8 Hz) and delta (less than 4 Hz) slow activity
any EEG waves that are below 8 hertz – theta (4 to 8 Hz) and delta (less than 4 Hz) slowing
EEG waveform with a duration of less than 70 milliseconds but greater than 20 milliseconds spike
EEG waveform consisting of a spike followed by a slow wave. Can be focal, lateralized, or generalized. Sometimes called spike and wave complex (AKA - spike and wave patterns)
EEG waveforms consisting of a spike followed by a slow wave. Can be focal, lateralized, or generalized. spike and wave discharge
sleep patterns including sleep spindles, vertex sharp waves and/or K-complexes mixed with theta and delta in a patient who is comatose and not arousable. spindle coma
used to refer to nonconvulsive seizures during which there are no clinical manifestations, i.e., no jerking movements subclinical
attenuation of EEG waveforms. Can be focal, lateralized, or generalized. suppression
an EEG pattern characterized by bursts of theta and/or delta often intermixed with faster frequencies with intervening periods of relative quiescence or flattening suppression burs or burst suppression
EEG waveforms that are equal in frequency and amplitude over homologous (corresponding) regions of the head symmetric
simultaneous occurrence in time of EEG waveforms over homologous head regions synchronous
EEG frequency band of 4 hertz to less than 8 hertz theta
EEG pattern characterized by theta frequency activity which is monotonous and widespread and shows no response to stimulation in a comatose patient theta coma
intermittent, rhythmic trains of delta activity in either temporal lobe that have been associated with temporal lobe epilepsy TIRDA - temporal intermittent rhythmic delta activity
isolated EEG waves or patterns that are distinctly different from the background transient
EEG waveforms that have 3 phases triphasic waves
occurring on one side unilateral
a normal component of sleep; vertex sharp transient maximal at Cz occurring; may be single or repetitive V-wave (vertex wave)
Created by: LTM