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bio204.s1.d36

cava bio 204 s1.d36 3.04 Two Types of Cells

QuestionAnswer
The earliest life-forms on earth were [-karyotic] cells The earliest life-forms on earth were prokaryotic cells
In 1993 J. William Schopf discovered fossilized bacteria in Western Australia. Schopf dated the rocks to 3.5 [...] years old. In 1993 J. William Schopf discovered fossilized bacteria in Western Australia. Schopf dated the rocks to 3.5 billion years old.
Fossil evidence shows that for the first 1.5 billion years, all life on Earth was in the form of single-cell [-karyotes]. Fossil evidence shows that for the first 1.5 billion years, all life on Earth was in the form of single-cell prokaryotes.
All life on Earth originates from the first prokaryotic cells which seem to date back to around [...] billion years ago. All life on Earth originates from the first prokaryotic cells which seem to date back to around 3.5 billion years ago.
In prokaryotes, DNA usually exists as a big [...] (or several [...]), while in eukaryotes, it's in long chains. In prokaryotes, DNA usually exists as a big loop (or several loops), while in eukaryotes, it's in long chains.
In many members of the Domain Archaea, the cell membrane consists of a phospholipid [-layer]. That feature sets them apart from bacteria and eukaryotic cells. In many members of the Domain Archaea, the cell membrane consists of a phospholipid monolayer, or only one layer of lipid molecules. That feature sets them apart from bacteria and eukaryotic cells.
[...]: One-celled eukaryotes that can change the shape of their cells sort of like Aquaman in the Spiderman comics. One kind of [...] causes a disease called [-ic] dysentery Amoeba: One-celled eukaryotes that can change the shape of their cells sort of like Aquaman in the Spiderman comics. One kind of amoeba causes a disease called amoebic dysentery
Paramecium: A kind of one-celled eukaryote that travels through water by [...] Paramecium: A kind of one-celled eukaryote that travels through water by beating tiny little hairs on its surface (called cilia) like the oars of one of those Greek war ships.
[D-s]: One-celled eukaryotic algae (plant-like organisms) that cloak themselves in a hard cell wall made of silica (the tough mineral found in sand). These tiny 'shells' remain long after the cells within them have died. Diatoms: One-celled eukaryotic algae (plant-like organisms) that cloak themselves in a hard cell wall made of silica (the tough mineral found in sand). These tiny 'shells' remain long after the cells within them have died.
Most scientists suggest that eukaryotes arose from [...]. Most scientists suggest that eukaryotes arose from prokaryotes.
More than 30 years ago, biologist Lynn Margulis championed the idea that organelles originated as [...] and were engulfed by other prokaryotic cells. (this idea became endosymbiotic theory) More than 30 years ago, biologist Lynn Margulis championed the idea that organelles originated as independent prokaryotic cells and were engulfed by other prokaryotic cells. (this idea became endosymbiotic theory)
Both mitochondria and chloroplasts contain their own [...], which is separate from the DNA in the cell's nucleus. Both mitochondria and chloroplasts contain their own DNA, which is separate from the DNA in the cell's nucleus.
organelle DNA shares many more traits with [...] DNA than with the eukaryotic DNA found in the nucleus. organelle DNA shares many more traits with bacterial DNA than with the eukaryotic DNA found in the nucleus.
Created by: mr.shapard