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bio204.s1.d30

cava bio 204 s1.d30 2.19 ATP

QuestionAnswer
Although energy can come from many molecules, ATP is the the molecule that [-ly] powers most of the things that cells do. Although energy can come from many molecules, ATP is the the molecule that directly powers most of the things that cells do.
ATP stands for [...] triphosphate. ATP stands for adenosine triphosphate.
ATP stands for adenosine [-phosphate]. ATP stands for adenosine triphosphate.
ATP stands for adenosine [tri-]. ATP stands for adenosine triphosphate.
The molecule ATP consists of the nitrogenous base [...], the sugar ribose, and three additional phosphate groups, or units made of a phosphorus atom (P) surrounded by four oxygen atoms (O). The molecule ATP consists of the nitrogenous base adenine, the sugar ribose, and three additional phosphate groups, or units made of a phosphorus atom (P) surrounded by four oxygen atoms (O).
The molecule ATP consists of the nitrogenous base adenine, the sugar [...], and three additional phosphate groups, or units made of a phosphorus atom (P) surrounded by four oxygen atoms (O). The molecule ATP consists of the nitrogenous base adenine, the sugar ribose, and three additional phosphate groups, or units made of a phosphorus atom (P) surrounded by four oxygen atoms (O).
The molecule ATP consists of the nitrogenous base adenine, the sugar ribose, and three additional [...] groups, or units made of a phosphorus atom (P) surrounded by four oxygen atoms (O). The molecule ATP consists of the nitrogenous base adenine, the sugar ribose, and three additional phosphate groups, or units made of a phosphorus atom (P) surrounded by four oxygen atoms (O).
Let's break down the name adenosine triphosphate: (adeno = [...]) + (ose = sugar) + (tri = 3) + (phosphate = PO4) Let's break down the name adenosine triphosphate: (adeno = adenine) + (ose = sugar) + (tri = 3) + (phosphate = PO4)
Let's break down the name adenosine triphosphate: (adeno = adenine) + (ose = [...]) + (tri = 3) + (phosphate = PO4) Let's break down the name adenosine triphosphate: (adeno = adenine) + (ose = sugar) + (tri = 3) + (phosphate = PO4)
Let's break down the name adenosine triphosphate: (adeno = adenine) + (ose = sugar) + (tri = 3) + ([-ate] = PO4) Let's break down the name adenosine triphosphate: (adeno = adenine) + (ose = sugar) + (tri = 3) + (phosphate = PO4)
Guess which sugar is in Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP)? Yep, [...], just like RNA... so ATP has the sugar and phosphate from RNA bonded to one of the bases in RNA... it's a tiny one-base piece of RNA with an extra couple phosphates attached! Guess which sugar is in Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP)? Yep, ribose, just like RNA... so ATP has the sugar and phosphate from RNA bonded to one of the bases in RNA... it's a tiny one-base piece of RNA with an extra couple phosphates attached!
Remember that the side chains of DNA and RNA are made of sugars bonded to each other with [-ate] groups. Remember that the side chains of DNA and RNA are made of sugars bonded to each other with phosphate groups.
Remember that the side chains of [...] and [...] are made of sugars bonded to each other with phosphate groups. Remember that the side chains of DNA and RNA are made of sugars bonded to each other with phosphate groups.
[...] works as the cheap blueprints for constructing proteins ([...] is the master copy). RNA works as the cheap blueprints for constructing proteins (DNA is the master copy).
[...] also acts as construction workers that collect amino acids, read the blueprints, and put the amino acids together to build proteins RNA also acts as construction workers that collect amino acids, read the blueprints, and put the amino acids together to build proteins
Tiny pieces of [...] with two extra phosphate groups (ATP) act as the batteries that power pretty much everything. Tiny pieces of RNA with two extra phosphate groups (ATP) act as the batteries that power pretty much everything.
From what we've learned so far, it seems like RNA does all the work and [...] gets all the credit. From what we've learned so far, it seems like RNA does all the work and DNA gets all the credit.
The triphosphate tail of ATP is where the usable [...] is (technically, it's in the electrons of the phosphates). The triphosphate tail of ATP is where the usable energy is (technically, it's in the electrons of the phosphates).
ATP is very reactive (because of the high-energy electrons), so it doesn't [...] nicely... it tends to find something to react with. ATP is very reactive (because of the high-energy electrons), so it doesn't store nicely... it tends to find something to react with.
ATP may be the motor of the cell, but there appear to be no organisms on earth that make ATP [-ly]. ATP must be made from other high-energy molecules (and NO K12, glucose is NOT the only option!) ATP may be the motor of the cell, but there appear to be no organisms on earth that make ATP directly. ATP must be made from other high-energy molecules (and NO K12, glucose is NOT the only option!)
When ATP breaks down into ADP (adenosine [...] = two-phosphate), it is eventually built back up to ATP in a process that recycles the molecules in your body over and over. When ATP breaks down into ADP (adenosine diphosphate = two-phosphate), it is eventually built back up to ATP in a process that recycles the molecules in your body over and over.
Created by: mr.shapard