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bio204.s1.d25

cava bio 204 s1.d25 2.14 Lipids

QuestionAnswer
Lipids are organic molecules that do not mix with [...] to form solutions. Lipids are organic molecules that do not mix with water to form solutions.
Ducks, loons, swans, and other water-fowl produce an [...] from a special gland near the base of their tail. If you watch ducks, you'll see them rub their beaks against this gland and then rub the [...] into their feathers. Ducks, loons, swans, and other water-fowl produce an oil from a special gland near the base of their tail. If you watch ducks, you'll see them rub their beaks against this gland and then rub the oil into their feathers.
Birds must keep their feathers is good condition in order to fly, and birds cannot fly with [...] feathers Birds must keep their feathers is good condition in order to fly, and birds cannot fly with wet feathers
Lipids are [-s] , a class of organic molecules that are made *almost* entirely of hydrogen and carbon Lipids are hydrocarbons , a class of organic molecules that are made *almost* entirely of hydrogen and carbon
Loons are aquatic birds similar to ducks and geese. Loons have a pointy beak that they use to [...] their prey. Loons are aquatic birds similar to ducks and geese. Loons have a pointy beak that they use to stab their prey.
Loony tunes are not named after loons. Loony is short for '[...]' in American English. Loony tunes are not named after loons. Loony is short for 'lunatic' in American English.
[-ic]: (hydro- = water) + (-phob- = fear) water-fearing; We use this word for anything that doesn't dissolve in water. Hydrophobic: (hydro- = water) + (-phob- = fear) water-fearing; We use this word for anything that doesn't dissolve in water.
Lipids are mainly [non-] and hydrophobic. Lipids are mainly nonpolar and hydrophobic.
Non-polar molecules do not dissolve in water because water molecules (which are polar) are more attracted to [...] than they are to non-polar molecules... the two won't mix. Non-polar molecules do not dissolve in water because water molecules (which are polar) are more attracted to other water molecules than they are to non-polar molecules... the two won't mix.
Soap molecules have both a [...] and [non-] region... therefore, they can bond to grease and oil, but also dissolve in water... dragging the grease and oil with them. That's how soaps get you cleaner than plain water can. Soap molecules have both a polar and nonpolar region... therefore, they can bond to grease and oil, but also dissolve in water... dragging the grease and oil with them. That's how soaps get you cleaner than plain water can.
Fats and oils are [...]-storage lipids. Fats and oils are energy-storage lipids.
Birds and other animals keep most of their energy stores as fat rather than carbohydrates because for the same amount of calories, fats are smaller and [...] less than half as much as carbohydrates. Birds and other animals keep most of their energy stores as fat rather than carbohydrates because for the same amount of calories, fats are smaller and weight less than half as much as carbohydrates.
Despite what k12 says, fat is generally NOT converted to [...]. Despite what k12 says, fat is generally NOT converted to glucose.
Within biology, if they talk about oils, they're talking about [-s] that are liquid at room temperature. Outside of biology, what we call 'oil' (mineral oil, motor oil, etc.) can be a very different kind of compound. Within biology, if they talk about oils, they're talking about fats (triglycerides) that are liquid at room temperature. Outside of biology, what we call 'oil' (mineral oil, motor oil, etc.) can be a very different kind of compound.
Fats (like butter, lard, and olive oil) are types of lipids called [-s]. [-s] are made of a 3-carbon glycerol molecule and three fatty acid molecules. Fats (like butter, lard, and olive oil) are types of lipids called triglycerides. Triglycerides are made of a 3-carbon glycerol molecule and three fatty acid molecules.
A fatty acid is a [...] of carbon and hydrogen atoms that has a cluster of carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen at one end (a carboxyl group). A fatty acid is a chain of carbon and hydrogen atoms that has a cluster of carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen at one end (a carboxyl group).
Fats are triglycerides that are [...] *at room temperature*, while oils are triglycerides that are [...] at room temperature. The distinction between the two is insignificant. Fats are triglycerides that are solid *at room temperature*, while oils are triglycerides that are liquid at room temperature. The distinction between the two is insignificant.
Chemistry Corner: It's meaningless to say that some substance is a solid, a liquid, or a gas. All matter can be any of those states; it just depends on the [...]. Chemistry Corner: It's meaningless to say that some substance is a solid, a liquid, or a gas. All matter can be any of those states; it just depends on the temperature.
[facepalm] K12 is incorrect when they say that fats are all converted to [...] first; although they *can* be used to produce [...], it is *far more common* for fats to be metabolized in a way that doesn't involve [...] at all. [facepalm] K12 is incorrect when they say that fats are all converted to glucose first; although they *can* be used to produce glucose, it is *far more common* for fats to be metabolized in a way that doesn't involve glucose at all.
Saturated fats have [...] bonds between carbon atoms. All of the carbons are 'saturated' with hydrogen atoms and they can't make any double or triple bonds with other carbon atoms. Saturated fats have single bonds between carbon atoms. All of the carbons are 'saturated' with hydrogen atoms and they can't make any double or triple bonds with other carbon atoms.
Unsaturated fats have [...] bonds between some carbon atoms. Some of their carbons are not saturated with hydrogen, so they form multiple bonds with another carbon atom. Unsaturated fats have double bonds between some carbon atoms. Some of their carbons are not saturated with hydrogen, so they form multiple bonds with another carbon atom.
Technically, an unsaturated fat could contain triple bonds between carbons as well as [...] bonds, but your teacher is unaware of any such fatty acids; they all seem to be [...] bonds. Technically, an unsaturated fat could contain triple bonds between carbons as well as double bonds, but your teacher is unaware of any such fatty acids; they all seem to be double bonds.
Saturated fats stick to each other a little more than unsaturated fats do... this causes saturated fats to be [...] at higher temperatures. Saturated fats stick to each other a little more than unsaturated fats do... this causes saturated fats to be solid at higher temperatures.
At low temperatures, saturated fats are [-er] than unsaturated fats. At low temperatures, saturated fats are stiffer than unsaturated fats.
Cold-water fish tend to have a higher percentage of [-ed] fats because these fats are less stiff in cold water, and this help the fish remain flexible. Cold-water fish tend to have a higher percentage of unsaturated fats because these fats are less stiff in cold water, and this help the fish remain flexible.
The K12 lessons refer to animal fats as 'saturated fats' and corn and olive oil as 'unsaturated fats'.... this is a common misconception. The fats of animals, corn, and oil *[...] contain some amount of saturated and unsaturated fats*. The K12 lessons refer to animal fats as 'saturated fats' and corn and olive oil as 'unsaturated fats'.... this is a common misconception. The fats of animals, corn, and oil *all contain some amount of saturated and unsaturated fats*.
Animal fats tend to have a higher percentage of [...] fats (human fat is about 30% [...]) than seed oils (such as corn) do (corn is about 13% [...] and olive is similar). Animal fats tend to have a higher percentage of saturated fats (human fat is about 30% saturated) than seed oils (such as corn) do (corn is about 13% saturated and olive is similar).
Cell membranes are formed from a special lipid called a [...]. Cell membranes are formed from a special lipid called a phospholipid.
How do organisms like the tenebrionid beetle maintain the [-ous] environment required for metabolism? By containing that environment inside its cells. How do organisms like the tenebrionid beetle maintain the aqueous environment required for metabolism? By containing that environment inside its cells. (just as ALL organisms do!)
The outer membrane of a cell is made of a dual layer of lipids. These lipids are [-lipids]. The outer membrane of a cell is made of a dual layer of lipids. These lipids are phospholipids.
A phospholipid is a [...] with a phosphate group instead of one of its fatty acids. A phospholipid is a triglyceride with a phosphate group instead of one of its fatty acids.
A phosphate group gives one end of a phospholipid a negative electrical charge—that is, this end of the chain is [hydro-] because it's charge attracts water molecules. A phosphate group gives one end of a phospholipid a negative electrical charge—that is, this end of the chain is hydrophilic because it's charge attracts water molecules.
[-ic]: (hydro-, water) + (phil, love) = water loving hydrophilic: (hydro-, water) + (phil, love) = water loving
Phospholipids naturally arrange themselves into [-es] much as when you blow soap bubbles, the water and soap naturally form a bubble. Phospholipids naturally arrange themselves into membranes much as when you blow soap bubbles, the water and soap naturally form a bubble.
The phospholipid bilayer is not only the key to the membrane around all of your cells, it's also the key to the membranes that separate all the little [-s] inside cells (such as the nucleus, the mitochondria, the endoplasmic reticulum, etc.) The phospholipid bilayer is not only the key to the membrane around all of your cells, it's also the key to the membranes that separate all the little organelles inside cells (such as the nucleus, the mitochondria, the endoplasmic reticulum, etc.)
The [...] bilayer is a HUGE deal in biology... it make a LOT of stuff possible, including cells themselves. The phospholipid bilayer is a HUGE deal in biology... it make a LOT of stuff possible, including cells themselves.
Steroids are special lipids that include carbon [-s]. Steroids are special lipids that include carbon rings.
Testosterone and estrogen are probably the most familiar steroids to you, but not all steroids are [...]. Testosterone and estrogen are probably the most familiar steroids to you, but not all steroids are hormones.
[...] are chemicals that the body uses to send signals to other parts of the body (like nervous signals, but slower; in fact many [...] are also used as neurotransmitters). Hormones are chemicals that the body uses to send signals to other parts of the body (like nervous signals, but slower; in fact many hormones are also used as neurotransmitters).
[-s] are another type of lipid. They are the largest of the lipid and this large size makes their molecules stick to each other more than any other lipid molecules do. This makes [-s] much stiffer than other lipids at room temperature. Waxes are another type of lipid. They are the largest of the lipid and this large size makes their molecules stick to each other more than any other lipid molecules do. This makes waxes much stiffer than other lipids at room temperature.
Waxes are commonly used by plants as a sort of protective coating for their [...] and as a way to lock moisture in. We use some waxes to polish floors, furniture, and cars. Waxes are commonly used by plants as a sort of protective coating for their leaves and as a way to lock moisture in. We use some waxes to polish floors, furniture, and cars.
The main classes of lipids are: 1. [...] 2. phospholipids 3. steroids 4. waxes The main classes of lipids are: 1. triglycerides (fats) 2. phospholipids 3. steroids 4. waxes
The main classes of lipids are: 1. triglycerides (fats) 2. [...] 3. steroids 4. waxes The main classes of lipids are: 1. triglycerides (fats) 2. phospholipids 3. steroids 4. waxes
The main classes of lipids are: 1. triglycerides (fats) 2. phospholipids 3. [...] 4. waxes The main classes of lipids are: 1. triglycerides (fats) 2. phospholipids 3. steroids 4. waxes
The main classes of lipids are: 1. triglycerides (fats) 2. phospholipids 3. steroids 4. [...] The main classes of lipids are: 1. triglycerides (fats) 2. phospholipids 3. steroids 4. waxes
Created by: mr.shapard