Busy. Please wait.
or

show password
Forgot Password?

Don't have an account?  Sign up 
or

Username is available taken
show password

why


Make sure to remember your password. If you forget it there is no way for StudyStack to send you a reset link. You would need to create a new account.
We do not share your email address with others. It is only used to allow you to reset your password. For details read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.


Already a StudyStack user? Log In

Reset Password
Enter the associated with your account, and we'll email you a link to reset your password.

Remove Ads
Don't know
Know
remaining cards
Save
0:01
To flip the current card, click it or press the Spacebar key.  To move the current card to one of the three colored boxes, click on the box.  You may also press the UP ARROW key to move the card to the "Know" box, the DOWN ARROW key to move the card to the "Don't know" box, or the RIGHT ARROW key to move the card to the Remaining box.  You may also click on the card displayed in any of the three boxes to bring that card back to the center.

Pass complete!

"Know" box contains:
Time elapsed:
Retries:
restart all cards




share
Embed Code - If you would like this activity on your web page, copy the script below and paste it into your web page.

  Normal Size     Small Size show me how

bio204.s1.d14

cava bio 204 s1.d14 2.03 Carbon and Life

QuestionAnswer
Organic compounds contain [...]. Organic compounds contain carbon.
[...] atoms are the building blocks of every molecule that is essential to life. Carbon atoms are the building blocks of every molecule that is essential to life.
An atom is not stable until its outer level contains the [...] number of electrons. An atom is not stable until its outer level contains the maximum number of electrons.
Hydrogen (H) and helium (He) can hold a maximum of 2 electrons in their outer level. Most other atoms can hold up to [...]. Hydrogen (H) and helium (He) can hold a maximum of 2 electrons in their outer level. Most other atoms can hold up to 8.
A full outer level of electrons is called an '[...]' because for most atoms, a full outer level is 8 electrons. (octet means a group of 8) A full outer level of electrons is called an 'octet' because for most atoms, a full outer level is 8 electrons. (octet means a group of 8)
Carbon has 4 valence electrons, so it has [...] available spaces in its outer level for bonding. Carbon can easily form 4 covalent bonds with other atoms, including other carbon atoms. Carbon has 4 valence electrons, so it has 4 available spaces in its outer level for bonding. Carbon can easily form 4 covalent bonds with other atoms, including other carbon atoms.
Hydrogen, with one electron, has only [...] empty space for valence electrons. Therefore, it can form only one covalent bond. Hydrogen, with one electron, has only one empty space for valence electrons. Therefore, it can form only one covalent bond.
In the line-drawing of methane, each black line between carbon and hydrogen represents a [...] that are shared between the central carbon atom (C) and the hydrogen atoms (H). In the line-drawing of methane, each black line between carbon and hydrogen represents a pair of electrons that are shared between the central carbon atom (C) and the hydrogen atoms (H).
[...] chain = carbon atoms all in a row. Straight chain = carbon atoms all in a row.
[-ed] chain = carbon atoms in a row, but with at least one 'branch' Branched chain = carbon atoms in a row, but with at least one 'branch'
Ring = carbon atoms form a [...] Ring = carbon atoms form a ring
macro- = Greek prefix meaning '[...]' macro- = Greek prefix meaning 'large'
[...] = a large (macro-) molecule macromolecule = a large (macro-) molecule
Carbohydrates are made of: 1. [...] (carbo-) 2. Hydrogen 3. Oxygen Note: (hydro = water: hydrogen and oxygen) Carbohydrates are made of: 1. Carbon (carbo-) 2. Hydrogen 3. Oxygen Note: (hydro = water: hydrogen and oxygen)
Carbohydrates are made of: 1. Carbon (carbo-) 2. [...] 3. Oxygen Note: (hydro = water: hydrogen and oxygen) Carbohydrates are made of: 1. Carbon (carbo-) 2. Hydrogen 3. Oxygen Note: (hydro = water: hydrogen and oxygen)
Carbohydrates are made of: 1. Carbon (carbo-) 2. Hydrogen 3. [...] Note: (hydro = water: hydrogen and oxygen) Carbohydrates are made of: 1. Carbon (carbo-) 2. Hydrogen 3. Oxygen Note: (hydro = water: hydrogen and oxygen)
Potatoes are loaded with a carbohydrate called starch. Each starch molecule is made up of many smaller carbohydrates, each of which is a sugar called [...]. Potatoes are loaded with a carbohydrate called starch. Each starch molecule is made up of many smaller carbohydrates, each of which is a sugar called glucose.
Carbohydrates are often abbreviated as [...] because they are made from only carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. Carbohydrates are often abbreviated as CHO because they are made from only carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen.
[...] is the word we use for fats and oils, but also for many other similar compounds found in living things. Lipid is the word we use for fats and oils, but also for many other similar compounds found in living things.
We tend to call lipids that are liquid at room temperature '[...]' and lipids that are solid at room temperature '[...]'. We tend to call lipids that are liquid at room temperature 'oils' and lipids that are solid at room temperature 'fats'.
We also use the word 'oil' for things such as motor oil and mineral oil, which are not lipids. Lipids are [...] compounds and we'll learn about how they are different from motor oil later. We also use the word 'oil' for things such as motor oil and mineral oil, which are not lipids. Lipids are biological compounds and we'll learn about how they are different from motor oil later.
The words 'fat', and 'oil' are much, much [-er] than the study of chemistry, which is why they cause some problems in chemistry class. It also explains why we haven't gotten rid of these words in favor of 'lipid'. The words 'fat', and 'oil' are much, much older than the study of chemistry, which is why they cause some problems in chemistry class. It also explains why we haven't gotten rid of these words in favor of 'lipid'.
One of the common components of lipids is [-ol]; a 3-carbon-chain alcohol that can bond to three other molecules.... sort of like that plastic thing that holds a six-pack together... but only 3. One of the common components of lipids is glycerol; a 3-carbon-chain alcohol that can bond to three other molecules.... sort of like that plastic thing that holds a six-pack together... but only 3.
One of the most important lipid molecules to know is the [tri-]: a glycerol molecule bonded to three molecules called fatty acids. One of the most important lipid molecules to know is the triglyceride: a glycerol molecule bonded to three molecules called fatty acids.
Perhaps the most common component of lipids is the '[...]', a long chain of carbon and hydrogen with a little acidic tail that lets it bond to a glycerol molecule. Perhaps the most common component of lipids is the 'fatty acid', a long chain of carbon and hydrogen with a little acidic tail that lets it bond to a glycerol molecule.
The membranes that make cells and organelles possible are made of molecules called [-s]. The membranes that make cells and organelles possible are made of molecules called phospholipids.
[-s] are lipids that include a phosphate group in their structure. phospholipids are lipids that include a phosphate group in their structure.
A phospholipid is like a triglyceride (1 glycerol + 3 fatty acids), but where one of the fatty acids is replaced with a [...] group (1 glycerol + 2 fatty acids + 1 [...] group). A phospholipid is like a triglyceride (1 glycerol + 3 fatty acids), but where one of the fatty acids is replaced with a phosphate group (1 glycerol + 2 fatty acids + 1 phosphate group).
The significance of the phosphate group in the phospholipid is that the phosphate group is attracted to [...], while fatty acids are not. This is the key to the structure of cell membranes. The significance of the phosphate group in the phospholipid is that the phosphate group is attracted to water, while fatty acids are not. This is the key to the structure of cell membranes.
Many structures in your body are made of or contain proteins , and proteins are made of molecules called [...] acids . Many structures in your body are made of or contain proteins , and proteins are made of molecules called amino acids .
It's difficult to explain to students what proteins are and what their significance is because they do so many many things. Although they can have other functions, perhaps the most important is that many proteins act like little tiny molecular [...] It's difficult to explain to students what proteins are and what their significance is because they do so many many things. Although they can have other functions, perhaps the most important is that many proteins act like little tiny molecular machines
A good example of proteins in action would be the large protein molecules in your muscles. When these proteins are powered by [...], they pull on each other, squeezing your muscles into a smaller shape, thus pulling on your bones. A good example of proteins in action would be the large protein molecules in your muscles. When these proteins are powered by ATP, they pull on each other, squeezing your muscles into a smaller shape, thus pulling on your bones.
Muscles are a good example of proteins in action because it's an example you can see with the naked eye, but there are many many other proteins that work like tiny machines powered by [...]. Muscles are a good example of proteins in action because it's an example you can see with the naked eye, but there are many many other proteins that work like tiny machines powered by ATP.
Your genetic material—the material in your body that determines the color of your eyes and hair, your bone structure, and so forth—is made of molecules called [...] acids Your genetic material—the material in your body that determines the color of your eyes and hair, your bone structure, and so forth—is made of molecules called nucleic acids
There are two basic types of nucleic acids—[...] acid (DNA) and [...] acid (RNA). There are two basic types of nucleic acids—deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA).
For historical reasons, a few types of carbon-containing compounds (such as carbon dioxide) are not considered '[...]' by most chemists For historical reasons, a few types of carbon-containing compounds (such as carbon dioxide) are not considered 'organic' by most chemists
A diamond is made of pure [...]. A diamond is made of pure carbon.
Carbon has 4 valence electrons, but it needs [#] to be stable. Carbon has 4 valence electrons, but it needs 8 to be stable.
The four classes of biological molecules we learn about in Unit 2 are: 1. [...] 2. fats 3. carbohydrates 4. nucleic acids The four classes of biological molecules we learn about in Unit 2 are: 1. protein 2. fats 3. carbohydrates 4. nucleic acids
The four classes of biological molecules we learn about in Unit 2 are: 1. protein 2. [...] 3. carbohydrates 4. nucleic acids The four classes of biological molecules we learn about in Unit 2 are: 1. protein 2. fats 3. carbohydrates 4. nucleic acids
The four classes of biological molecules we learn about in Unit 2 are: 1. protein 2. fats 3. [...] 4. nucleic acids The four classes of biological molecules we learn about in Unit 2 are: 1. protein 2. fats 3. carbohydrates 4. nucleic acids
The four classes of biological molecules we learn about in Unit 2 are: 1. protein 2. fats 3. carbohydrates 4. [...] The four classes of biological molecules we learn about in Unit 2 are: 1. protein 2. fats 3. carbohydrates 4. nucleic acids
Created by: mr.shapard