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AJ 5 Test Ch 5 and 6

Adm Justice 5 Test 3

QuestionAnswer
What does CODIS stand for Combined DNA Index System
Name 4 ways a person can be identified Biometically Retinal Scan, Iris Scan, Fingerprints, DNA
Which is most used nowadays, the retinal scan or the Iris scan and why. The IRIS scan, unlike the retinal, can be imaged from a distance, and are not impacted by contact lenses or glasses and it is much quicker to scan vs the Retinal scan. No two eyes are alike and patterns are stable.
What is the most popular biometric technology Fingerprinting
They are found on the soles of the feet and palms of the hands. When reading a fingerprint, in actuality, you are reading the ___________ _____________. Friction Ridges
A close examination of friction ridges reveals that the surface is broken in an irregular fashion by these. Sweat Pores
The identifiable aspects of a fingerprint (that which makes every print unique) are called what? ...aka? Minutia aka Ridge Characteristics
True or False. As the fingers grow and age , the fingerprint will begin to change noticeably. False. Fingers will grow and the print will enlarge, but the ridge characteristic remains unchanged.
Name the 3 types of of prints found at a crime scene (straight quiz question here) Latent, Patent, Plastic.
Name the three types of fingerprint patterns. Loop, Whorl and Arch
What is the difference between a Latent print and a Patent print? Latent prints are invisible to the eye but Patent prints are easily identifiable.
What is a Plastic Print? Print left if fingers or hands come in contact with a soft material like putty , wet cement, dust, plaster, etc.
What is the most common chemical used for developing latent prints? Ninhydrin
This method is widely accepted method for developing fingerprints from surfaces like plastic bags, gun handles, Bodies or Formica. Superglue fuming
This is used to develop prints on paper Silver Nitrate
What is the best way to raise a print from a decomposed body? What is the limitation on ths method? Heat water to the boiling point and immerse the hand. Should not be repeated more that 3 times.
Name the three possible conclusions that can be drawn from a print analysis. 1. The Identification match is made. 2. The print eliminates the person as a subject or, 3. Insufficient ridge detail to form a conclusion
What does AFIS stand for? Automated Fingerprint Identification System
This is a ready supply of photographs for witnesses to leaf through. Rogues Gallery
Name the three Identification methods discussed in class. Fingerprint Comparison, DNA Comparison, or Composite Drawing
In which two areas of business are Biometric ID systems being mostly used. Banking and Government Agencies
In managing crime scenes, this is the most important aspect of any investigation. The preliminary investigation
What is a solvability factor? Set of factors that determine the likelihood that a case can be solved and whether resources should be invested towards doing so.
Give an 4 - 5 examples of questions that factor into the solvability of a case. 1. Were there any witnesses, 2. Do we have a description of the suspect, 3. Any MO, 4. Any prints or physical evidence, 5. Was a vehicle used and identified.
Subsequent to the initial investigation should be the what? Follow up investigation
What does MCI stand for Managing Criminal Investigations
This is used to organize and coordinate field level operations for emergencies on a small or large scale. The Incident Command System (ICS)
Like the ICS, this system is used to facilitate the management of crime scenes that require a multijurisdictional response. The National Incident Management Systems (NIMS)
What can be concluded when the witness and victim statement are identical? Why? Statements are generally the product of fabrication because no two people experience the same event in the same way.
What case determined that "any type of wiretapping that violated a persons reasonable expectation of privacy was a search under the 4th Amendment"? Katz vs. United States
True or false, a car parked in a KFC parking lot cannot have a tracking device attached unless a warrant is secured either before or after the device is placed. FALSE..Warrant not required if the car is parked in a public place
What is the difference between an interview and an interrogation? You interview witnesses or persons with information, you interrogate suspects. The goal of interviewing is to gather info, the goal of interrogation is to establish the truth.
If a homicide investigation does not have a suspect within 24 hours, the probability of solving (Increases/Decreases) over time. Decreases
Multiple murderers fall into three categories. What are they? 1. Serial, Mass, and Spree killers.
What is the difference between a serial killer, mass, killer, and spree killer? Serial Killer (Murders on at least 3 occasions with cooling off periods between each killing), Mass Killer (Conducts 4+killings in one incident), Spree Killer (Kills at two or more locations all part of same incident)
Another name for a killers signature that makes his/her crime distinguishable as one he/she committed is... Modus Operandi (MO)
What is meant by FLIRs Forward Looking Infra-Red
What is the goal of investigating a crime? Conviction
Created by: JeromeG