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Bio Final Review

Study for final

QuestionAnswer
What invention led to the discovery of cells? What is the Microscope?
What are the parts of the cell theory? A... C... N... 1) All living things are made up of cells 2) Cells are the basic units of structure and function of cells 3) New cells are produced from existing cells - Rudolf Virchow is what theory?
What is are the Vacuoles? (in a cell What store materials like water, salts, proteins and carbohydrates, produce proteins by following coded instructions that come from DNA?
What is an Endoplasmic Reticulum? (in a cell) Where are lipid components of the cell membrane assembled?
What is the Lysosome? (in a cell) What breaks down lipids (or fats), carbohydrates, and proteins into smaller molecules that can be used by the rest of the cell?
What is the Golgi Apparatus? (in a cell) What modifies, sorts, and packages proteins and other materials from the endoplasmic reticulum for storage in the cell or release outside the cell?
What are the Chloroplasts? (in a plant cell) What captures the energy from the sunlight to convert it into food that contains chemicals energy in a process called photosynthesis?
What is the Cell Membrane? (in a cell) What regulates what enters and leaves the cell and also protects and supports the cell?
What is the Cell Wall? (in a cell) What is the strong supporting layer around the cell membrane in some cells?
What is the Cytoplasm? (in a cell) What contains the cytosol (or gel like substance that fills the cell) and all other organelles outside of the nucleus?
What is A Nucleus? (in a cell) What contains the cell's DNA, and coded instructions for making proteins and other important molecules?
Definition of a Phospholipid? What is a part of a class of lipids that are major components of a cell's membrane?
What is a Hydrophilic head? What Loves water and protects the Hydrophobic tails from the water?
What is a Hydrophobic tail? What Hates water and gets protected by the Hydrophilic heads?
What is the Definition of a Phospholipid Bilayer? What is a double layered sheet structure of a cell membrane that goes around the entire outside of a cell and is made up of phospholipids.
What is the Definition of a Fluid Mosaic Model? What model describes the structure of cell membranes. In this model, a flexible layer made of lipid molecules is interspersed with large protein molecules that act as channels through which other molecules enter and leave the cell?
What is the Definition of Passive Transfusion What is the movement of materials across the cell membrane without the use of energy?
What is the Definition of Simple Diffusion? What is the process by which molecules of a substance move from an area of higher concentration to an area of lower concentration?
What is the Definition of Selectively Permeable? What means to selectively let things in or through something?
What is the Mitochondria? (in a cell) What converts the chemical energy stored in food into compounds that are more convenient for the cell to use
What are the Ribosomes? (in a cell) What produces proteins by following coded instructions that come from DNA?
What are located in the center of the Nuclei? (in a cell) Where is the Nucleolus located in the cell?
What is the Definition of Facilitated Diffusion? What is the process in which molecules pass through the cell membrane?
What is Osmosis? What is the movement of water in cells and outside of cells?
What is an Aquaporin? And Why is it important? What is located in a cell membrane and allows water to pass right through them?
What is called Isotonic? What is it called when there is a concentration of solutes are the same inside and outside of the cell?
What is called Hypotonic? What is it called when on the outside, there is a lower solute concentration than the inside of a cell?
When it is called Hypotonic what goes into the cell causing it to swell? The water moves into the cell causing it to swell.
What is called Hypertonic What is it called when the outside of the cell has a higher solute concentration than inside the cell.
True or false? When it is called Hypertonic all of the water moves out of the cell. True! When it is called Hypertonic some of the water will move out of the cell causing it to shrink.
What is the Definition of Active Transport? What is the movement of materials against a concentration gradient that requires the use of energy?
How does the Protein Pump work? What does it use to let the proteins through? What is a change in the shape of cell membrane proteins that allows substances to bind on one side of the membrane and be released on the other side? A key is used to let the proteins through its actual name is ATP it fits into the side of the Pump.
What is the difference between Endocytosis and Exocytosis? In En. the membrane forms a pocket around a particle(s) that needs to move into the cell. In Ex. the membrane of a vesicle forms around a particle(s) that need to be moved out of the cell
Definition of Theory... A collection of hypotheses that have been proven many times.
Definition of Control... A part of an experiment that does not change
What does the Arm of a microscope do? Supports the microscope and you carry the microscope by holding this part of it.
What does the Ocular of a microscope do? Is the lens closest to the viewer's eye and magnifies 10 time.
What does the Nosepiece of a microscope do? it is used to switch from low to high power
what does the Scanning power on a microscope do? it magnifies 4 times and is the smallest lens.
What does the Low power on a microscope do? It magnifies 10 times and is the middle lens.
What does the High power on a microscope do? It magnifies 40 times and is the longest lens.
What does the Course adjustment knob on a microscope do? It is used to move the stage quickly.
What does the Fine adjustment knob on a microscope do? It is used to focus on a specimen.
What does the Coverslip of a microscope do? It covers the specimen and keeps it in its place.
What does the Slide of a microscope do? It is the place of a specimen and holds it where the lens can see it.
What does the Stage of a microscope do? It is the platform for the slide to go on.
What does the Stage Clips on a microscope do? They keep the slide in place.
What does the Diaphragm on a microscope do? It regulates the amount of light that shines on a specimen.
What does the Base on a microscope do? It supports the microscope you put your hand under it to carry it.
What does the Mirror/Light of a microscope do? It shines light on the specimen.
Six steps of the scientific method are? Identify the problem, Collect observations, Form a hypothesis, Perform a controlled experiment, Record and analyze data, and Form a conclusion.
What are the 5 properties of life? Cellular organization, Metabolism, Homeostasis, Reproduction, Growth and development.
Define homeostasis. Is a stable internal environment.
Magnifications is... How big something appears.
Resolution is... How clear something is.
A dependent variable is... The variable that changes in an experiment.
A independent variable is... The variable that doesn't change in an experiment.
Define Equilibrium. An equal concentration of solute throughout the solution.
ATP is... The energy that fuels the activities of life in a cell.
Organelles...
Nucleotides...
RNA... Instructions in genes to build proteins Ribonucleic Acid.
Created by: RubyRose99