Busy. Please wait.
or

show password
Forgot Password?

Don't have an account?  Sign up 
or

Username is available taken
show password

why


Make sure to remember your password. If you forget it there is no way for StudyStack to send you a reset link. You would need to create a new account.
We do not share your email address with others. It is only used to allow you to reset your password. For details read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.


Already a StudyStack user? Log In

Reset Password
Enter the associated with your account, and we'll email you a link to reset your password.

Remove Ads
Don't know
Know
remaining cards
Save
0:01
To flip the current card, click it or press the Spacebar key.  To move the current card to one of the three colored boxes, click on the box.  You may also press the UP ARROW key to move the card to the "Know" box, the DOWN ARROW key to move the card to the "Don't know" box, or the RIGHT ARROW key to move the card to the Remaining box.  You may also click on the card displayed in any of the three boxes to bring that card back to the center.

Pass complete!

"Know" box contains:
Time elapsed:
Retries:
restart all cards




share
Embed Code - If you would like this activity on your web page, copy the script below and paste it into your web page.

  Normal Size     Small Size show me how

Nurs 334 - Quiz 1

Behavioral Health Nursing: Psycho-pharmocology Quiz

QuestionAnswer
Name the four monamines from Table 4-2 (p. 55-56), and their functions. Dopamine (DA), Norepinephrine (NE), Serotonin (5-HT), and Histamine. All are excitatory (BTW, all make you crazy, but will less depressed...except histamine...just crazy)
Name the two amino acids from Table 4-2 (p.55-56) Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid or GABA (inhibitory), and Glutamate (excitatory)
Name a cholinergic from Table 4-2 (p.55-56) Acetylcholine (ACh)
Name the three peptides from Table 4-2 (p. 55-56) Substance P (SP), Somatostatin (SRIF), and Neurotensin (NT)
What is the function and clinical relevance of Dopamine? (DA) Excitatory: Fine muscle movement, Integration of emotions and thoughts, decision making, increase in sex/thyroid/adrenal hormones. Increases mania, schizo; decreases Parkinson's, depression
What is the function and clinical relevance of Norepinephrine? (NE) Excitatory: Mood, attention and arousal, fight or flight. Increases mania, anxiety, schizo; decreases depression.
What is the function and clinical relevance of Serotonin? (5-HT) Excitatory: Mood, sleep regulation, hunger, pain, aggression, hormones. Increases anxiety; decreases depression.
What is the function and clinical relevance of Histamine? Excitatory: Alertness, inflammation, gastric secretion. Increases hyperactivity, compulsivity, suicidal depression; decreases sedation, weight gain, and hypotension.
What is the function and clinical relevance of Gamma-aminobutryric Acid? (GABA) Inhibitory: reduces anxiety, excitation, aggresion; maybe pain perception. Anticonvulsant and muscle relaxant. Increases anxiety REDUCTION; decreases mania, anxiety (wtf?), and schizo.
What is the function and clinical relevance of Glutamate? Excitatory. Two receptors: NMDA and AMPA. Upside: AMPA plays a role in learning and memory. Downside: prolonged excitation of NMDA kills neurons. Upside: NMDA can decrease psychosis. So, you will be dumb and sane, and will remember being smart and crazy.
What is the function and clinical relevance of Acetylcholine? Learning, memory, mood, sexual aggression, parasympathetic nervous system. Down with alz, hunt chor, and park's, up with depression. Bummer.
What is the function and clinical relevance of Substance P? Substance P, or Sub P is a rapper from Garden City. OK, no, it;s really an antidepressant, and anti-anxiety med; promotes memory and PAIN.
What is the function and clinical relevance of Somatostatin? (SRIF) Altered levels associated with cognitive disease. Thus decreases alz, and SRIF in CSF. Increases hunt chor.
What is the function and clinical relevance of Neurotensin? (NT) Antipsychotic-like properties. Decreases NT found in CSF of schizos.
What happens as an adverse effect of blocking GABA transmission? Lowers the threshold for seizures.
What happens as an adverse effect of blocking Alpha-2 receptors? Sexual dysfunction. Priapsim (WTF?)
What happens as an adverse effect of blocking Alpha-1 receptors? Orthostatic hypotension, dizziness, antipsychotic, reflux tachycardia, and failure to ejaculate.
What happens as an adverse effect of blocking Muscarnic cholenergic (ACh) receptors? Dry mouth, blurred vision, urinary retention, constipation, tachycardia (like being in the desert).
What happens as an adverse effect of blocking D-2 receptors? Anti-psychosis, EPS, increase prolatctin, amenorrhea...like being pregnant, save the anti-psychosis.
What happens as an adverse effect of blocking H-1 receptors? Sedation, substantial weight gain, orthostasis.
What happens as an adverse effect of blocking 5-H2 receptors? Anti-psychosis, weight gain, hypotension, ejaculatory dysfunction.
What are the common side effects of Clozapine? Suppresses bone marrow; neutropenia / agranulocytosis. Also, weight gain (as with brother drug olanzapine)
What are the common side effects of Olanzapine? Bascially, worry about getting diabetes. Since it blocks seritonin (and dopamine receptors, one is likely to gain weight, metabolic issues, insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia, etc. Think Olanzo, the fat diabetic, and his fat older sister Clozapine.
What are the common side-effects for Risperidone? EPS, orthostatic hypertension (also blocks some A-1)
What are the common side effects for Quetiapine? Orthostatic hypotension (from A-1, and A-2 inhibition)
What are the common side effects of Ziprasidone? Hypotension and sedation. Like Quetiapine, it has more than just antagonist effect on D's and 5-HT's, in that it inhibits some As (hypotension), and H-1 (alertness) as well.
Aripiprazole (abilify) Seems to be a wonder drug with fewer side effects, as it both inhibits abnormally high dopamine levels, it excites them where it needs to.
Lithium...downsides...go! 1) Cardiac dysrhythmias 2) Seizures 3) Tremors / extreme motor dysfunction 4) Polyuria, edema
Lithium...therapeutic index...go! Uhhh, the book only refers to it being the lowest of all anti-psychotic drugs. Found around 1.5 online...which is awful BTW.
Side effects of MAOIs...such as marplan, parnate, nardil (all of the arrrrr sound...like a pirate) These pirates sail into the liver to prevent destruction of their friends the MAOs, thus causing intense vasoconstriction, thus high BP.
What is EMSAM? Think I am Sam, the pirate. It's an MAOI (pirate) PATCH. Yup, a pirate patch! The first anti-depressant patch.
What are the side effects of TCAs? (Elavil, Pamelor) Unlike SSRIs, these block the re-uptake of NE (and some 5-HT, but not as much as SSRIs); causes diziness, and hypotension which I don't get at all; sedation and weight gain, however, make total sense.
What are the side effects of SSRI's? (Prozac, Celexa, Paxil, Zoloft) Anxiety, insomnia, sexual disfunction, and GI disturbances.
What are the features of benzos? (Valium, Klonopin, Xanax, Adivan, Dalcion) Dalmane, Halcion are hypnotic, where Xanax, and Ativan are non-sleep producing. W/ alcohol can cause respiratory failure. Falls,
Buspirone, unlike benzos, lacks what major side-efect of anti-anxiety medication? The sedative-hypnotic effect. Also, not a CNS depressant, so you can still get loaded. Word.
Created by: scottheadrick