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Ortho1 tests

Ortho 1 special tests

QuestionAnswer
Apprehension test for anterior shoulder dislocation The patient is positioned in supine with the arm in 90 degrees of abduction. The therapist laterally rotates the patientʼs shoulder. A positive test is indicated by a look of apprehension or a facial grimace prior to reaching an end point.
Speedʼs test The patient is positioned in sitting or standing with the elbow extended and the forearm supinated.
Speedʼs test The therapist places one hand over the bicipital groove and the other hand on the volar surface of the forearm. The therapist resists active shoulder flexion.
Speedʼs test A positive test is indicated by pain or tenderness in the bicipital groove region and may be indicative of bicipital tendonitis.
Yergasonʼs test The patient is positioned in sitting with 90 degrees of elbow flexion and the forearm pronated. The humerus is stabilized against the patientʼs thorax.
Yergasonʼs test The therapist places one hand on the patientʼs forearm and the other hand over the bicipital groove. The patient is directed to actively supinate and laterally rotate against resistance.
Yergasonʼs test A positive test is indicated by pain or tenderness in the bicipital groove and may be indicative of bicipital tendonitis.
Drop arm test The patient is positioned in sitting or standing with the arm in 90 degrees of abduction. The patient is asked to slowly lower the arm to their side.
Drop arm test A positive test is indicated by the patient failing to slowly lower the arm to their side or by the presence of severe pain and may be indicative of a tear in the rotator cuff.
Supraspinatus test The patient is positioned with the arm in 90 degrees of abduction followed by 30 degrees of horizontal adduction with the thumb pointing downward. The therapist resists the patientʼs attempt to abduct the arm.
Supraspinatus test A positive test is indicated by weakness or pain and may be indicative of a tear of the supraspinatus tendon, impingement or suprascapular nerve involvement.
Valgus stress test nThe patient is positioned in sitting with the elbow in 20 to 30 degrees of flexion.
Medial epicondylitis test The therapist palpates the medial epicondyle and supinates the patientʼs forearm, extends the wrist, and extends the elbow.
Medial epicondylitis test A positive test is indicated by pain in the medial epicondyle region and may be indicative of medial epicondylitis.
Tinelʼs sign The patient is positioned in sitting with the elbow in slight flexion. The therapist taps with the index finger between the olecranon process and the medial epicondyle.
Tinelʼs sign A positive test is indicated by a tingling sensation in the ulnar nerve distribution of the forearm, hand, and fingers. A positive test may be indicative of ulnar nerve compression or compromise.
Capillary refill test A positive test is indicated by a delayed or muted response (greater than two seconds) and may be indicative of arterial insufficiency.
Phalenʼs test .The therapist flexes the patientʼs wrists . maximally and asks the patient to hold the position for 60 seconds
Phalenʼs test A positive test is indicated by tingling in the thumb, index finger, middle finger, and lateral half of the ring finger and may be indicative of carpal tunnel syndrome due to median nerve compression.
Tinelʼs sign The therapist taps over the volar aspect of the patientʼs wrist. A positive test is indicated by tingling in the thumb, index finger, middle finger, and lateral half of the ring finger distal to the contact site at the wrist.
Tinelʼs sign A positive test may be indicative of carpal tunnel syndrome due to median nerve compression.
Lachman test The patient is positioned in supine with the knee flexed to 20-30 degrees. The therapist stabilizes the distal femur with one hand and places the other hand on the proximal tibia. The therapist applies an anterior directed force to the tibia on the femur.
Lachman test A positive test is indicated by excessive anterior translation of the tibia on the femur with a diminished or absent end-point and may be indicative of an anterior cruciate ligament injury.
Lateral pivot shift test The patient is positioned in supine with the hip flexed and abducted to 30 degrees with slight medial rotation. The therapist medially rotates the tibia and applies a valgus force to the knee while the knee is slowly flexed.
Lateral pivot shift test A positive test is indicated by a palpable shift or clunk occurring between 20 and 40 degrees of flexion and is indicative of anterolateral rotary instability. The shift or clunk results from the reduction of the tibia on the femur.
Valgus stress test The patient is positioned in supine with the knee flexed to 20-30 degrees.
Valgus stress test A positive test is indicated by excessive valgus movement and may be indicative of a medial collateral ligament sprain.
Varus stress test The patient is positioned in supine with the knee flexed to 20-30 degrees..
Varus stress test A positive test with the knee in full extension may be indicative of damage to the lateral collateral ligament, posterior cruciate ligament, arcuate complex, and posterolateral capsule.
Apleyʼs compression test The patient is positioned in prone with the knee flexed to 90 degrees.. The therapist medially and laterally rotates the tibia while applying a compressive force through the tibia.
Apleyʼs compression test A positive test is indicated by pain or clicking and may be indicative of a meniscal lesion.
McMurray test supine With the knee fully flexed the therapist medially rotates the tibia and extends the knee.
McMurray test A positive test is indicated by a click or pronounced crepitation felt over the joint line and may be indicative of a posterior meniscal lesion.
Created by: micah10