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S&PR7

lifting

QuestionAnswer
Body Mechanics and Lifting Guidelines A therapist must consistently use proper body mechanics when treating patients and avoid unnecessary stress and strain by maintaining proper alignment within the musculoskeletal system.
Principles of Proper Body Mechanics Use the shortest lever arm possible
Principles of Proper Body Mechanics Stay close to the patient when possible
Principles of Proper Body Mechanics Use larger muscles to perform heavy work
Principles of Proper Body Mechanics Maintain a wide base of support
Principles of Proper Body Mechanics Avoid any rotary movement when lifting
Principles of Proper Body Mechanics Attempt to maintain the center of gravity of the therapist and patient within the base of support
Lifting Guidelines Always attempt to increase your base of support
Lifting Guidelines Maintain a proper lumbar curve as you lift
Lifting Guidelines Pivot your feet when lifting; do not twist your back to turn
Lifting Guidelines Maintain a slow and consistent speed while lifting
Lifting Guidelines Only lift an object as a last resort
Pushing or Pulling an Object Use a semi-squat position to push or pull
Pushing or Pulling an Object Apply the force parallel to the surface that the object should be moved upon
Pushing or Pulling an Object Exert an initial force that is adequate to overcome the counter force of inertia and friction
Pushing or Pulling an Object Attempt to push, pull, slide or roll the object prior to lifting or carrying an object
Deep Squat Lift Begin with hips below the level of the knees
Deep Squat Lift Assume a wide base of support
Deep Squat Lift Straddle the object
Deep Squat Lift Grasp the object from each side or from beneath
Deep Squat Lift The trunk should remain vertical
Deep Squat Lift Maintain a lumbar lordosis and anterior pelvic tilt
Half-Kneeling Lift Begin in a half-kneel position
Half-Kneeling Lift The bottom leg should be positioned behind and to the side of the object
Half-Kneeling Lift Maintain a normal lumbar lordosis
Half-Kneeling Lift Lift the object onto the knee and draw it closer to the trunk
Half-Kneeling Lift Continue the lift by holding the object close as you assume a standing position
One Leg Stance Lift Used for lifting light objects that can be lifted with one extremity
One Leg Stance Lift Face the object in a lunge position
One Leg Stance Lift Shift weight onto the forward extremity
One Leg Stance Lift Flex the forward extremity and lower to reach the object
One Leg Stance Lift The hind leg rises off the ground to counterbalance the shift in weight
One Leg Stance Lift Maintain a neutral spine throughout the lift
Power Lift Begin with the hips above the level of the knees
Power Lift Assume a wide base of support behind the object with the feet parallel to each other
Power Lift Grasp the object from each side or from underneath
Power Lift The trunk should remain in a vertical position
Power Lift Maintain a lumbar lordosis and anterior pelvic tilt
Traditional Lift Begin with the lower extremities in a full squat facing the object
Traditional Lift The feet should be positioned in an anterior-posterior manner on each side of the object
Traditional Lift Grasp the object and flex the upper extremities to initiate the lift
Traditional Lift Use bilateral lower extremities to provide the work of the lift
Traditional Lift Keep the object close to the trunk during the lift
Traditional Lift Maintain normal lumbar lordosis
Traditional Lift Do not lift with the back
Created by: micah10