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orbit

orbit comp

QuestionAnswer
What bones make up the orbit? frontal, ethmoid, sphenoid, lacrimal, palatine, maxillary and zygomatic
How is the orbit situated in relation to the MSP? the long axis is angled 37 degrees obliquely, posteriorly and medially
What basic anatomy does the orbit have? roof, floor, base, medial and lateral walls, apex, fissures
What bones bake up the orbit? frontal, ethmoid, sphenoid, lacrimal, palatine, maxillary, zygomatic
What is the purpose of the orbit? bony socket for eyes, transmission of blood vessels and nerves
How does the orbit sit in relation to the OML? 30 degrees superiorly
The apex of the orbit corresponds to: the optic foramen
“blow out fracture” pressure directed to the eyeball forces the eye into the orbit and breaks the bony floor
Positioning and QC considerations for orbit imaging: smallest OID, close collimation, reduce motion, clean IS
Alternate name for Rhese method parietoorbital oblique projection
What is used for the “3 point landing” in a Rhese? zygoma, nose and chin
Pt. position for Rhese AML perpendicular to bucky, MSP 53 degrees to IR
CR entry for Rhese perpendicular, entering 1” superior, 1” posterior to TEA
When positioning for a Rhese, which orbit is of interest? side down
Eval criteria for orbit Rhese method optic foramina projected into inferior lateral quadrant of orbit imaged
If the optic foramina is projected to far superior on a Rhese… the AML was not correctly angulated
If the optic foramina is projected to far medially on a Rhese… patient rotation was off
Pt position for waters nose and forehead on bucky, crosshares ¾” distal to nasion, MSP and OML perpendicular to IR
CR entry for waters 30 degrees caudad exiting the orbits
Eval criteria for waters petrous pyramids below the orbital shadows, no rotation
What piece of anatomy is found at the apex of the orbit? the optic foramen
How does the orbit sit in relation to the MSP? 37 degrees
The apex of the orbit corresponds to: the optic foramen
What can happen if a blowout fracture is not diagnosed? vision can be jeopardized
What does the optic nerve do? connect the eye to the brain
Conjunctiva thin mucous membrane covering the eye
Rods and cones are found on what part of the eye? the retina
Rods are responsible for what type of vison? night
Cones are responsible for what type of vision? daylight
Created by: annaluz87