Busy. Please wait.
or

show password
Forgot Password?

Don't have an account?  Sign up 
or

Username is available taken
show password

why


Make sure to remember your password. If you forget it there is no way for StudyStack to send you a reset link. You would need to create a new account.
We do not share your email address with others. It is only used to allow you to reset your password. For details read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.


Already a StudyStack user? Log In

Reset Password
Enter the associated with your account, and we'll email you a link to reset your password.
Don't know
Know
remaining cards
Save
0:01
To flip the current card, click it or press the Spacebar key.  To move the current card to one of the three colored boxes, click on the box.  You may also press the UP ARROW key to move the card to the "Know" box, the DOWN ARROW key to move the card to the "Don't know" box, or the RIGHT ARROW key to move the card to the Remaining box.  You may also click on the card displayed in any of the three boxes to bring that card back to the center.

Pass complete!

"Know" box contains:
Time elapsed:
Retries:
restart all cards
share
Embed Code - If you would like this activity on your web page, copy the script below and paste it into your web page.

  Normal Size     Small Size show me how

Psychology 11

Chapter 11

TermDefinition
Personality The unique collection of attitudes, emotions, thoughts, habits, impulses, and behaviors that define how a person typically behaves across situations.
Psychoanalytic perspective A personality approach developed by Freud that sees personality as the product of driving forces within a person that are often conflicting and sometimes unconscious.
Conscious level The level consciousness that holds all the thoughts, perceptions, and impulses, of which we are aware.
Preconscious level The level of consciousness that holds thoughts, perceptions, and impulses, of which we could potentially be aware.
Unconscious level The level of awareness that contains all the thoughts, perceptions, and impulses, of which we are unaware.
Id The unconscious part of the personality that seeks pleasure and gratification.
Pleasure principle The basis on which the id operates; to feel good and maximize gratification.
Ego The conscious part of the personality that attempts to meet the demands of the id in a socially appropriate way.
Reality principle The basis on which the ego operates; finding socially appropriate means to fulfill id demands.
Superego The part of the personality that represents your moral conscience.
Oral stage Freud's first psychosexual stage of development, which occurs during the first year of life, in which the handling of the child's feeding experiences affects personality differences.
Anal stage Freud's second psychosexual stage, which occurs from approximately 18 months to 3 years of age, in which the parents' regulation of the child's biological urge to expel or retain feces affects personality development.
Phallic stage Freud;s third psychosexual stage of development, which occurs between ages 3 and 6, in which the boys experience the Oedipus complex and little girls the Electra complex.
Oedipus complex In the male, an unconscious sexual urge for the mother that develops during the phallic stage.
Electra complex In the female, an unconscious sexual urge for the father that develops during the phallic psychosexual stage.
Latency stage Freud's fourth psychosexual stage of development, which occurs from around age of 6 to puberty, in which the child's sexuality is suppressed due to widening social contacts with school, peers, and family.
Genital stage Freud's final psychosexual stage of development, which occurs during puberty, in which sexual energy is transferred toward peers of the other sex or same sex.
Personal unconscious According to Jung, the part of the unconscious that consists of forgotten memories and repressed experiences from one's past.
Collective unconscious According to Jung, the part of the unconscious that contains images and material universal to people all time periods and cultures.
Archetypes According to Jung, mental representations of symbols themes and predispositions to respond to the world in a certain way that are contained in the collective unconscious.
Basic anxiety According to Horney, the feeling of helplessness that develops in children from early relationships.
Trait approach A personality perceptive that attempts to describe personality by emphasizing internal, biological aspects of personality called traits.
Trait Tendency to behave in a certain way across most situations.
Central traits According to Allport, those tendencies we have to behave in a certain way across most situations.
Secondary traits According to Allport, the tendencies we have that are less consistent and describe how we behave in certain situations.
Cardinal traits According to Allport, those dominant elements of our personality that drive all of our behaviors.
Surface traits According to Cattell, basic traits that describe people's personalities.
Source traits According to Cattell, universal tendencies that underlie and are at the core of surface traits.
Introversion Personality traits that involve energy directed inward, such as being calm or peaceful.
Extraversion Personality traits that involve energy directed outward, such as being easygoing, lively, or excitable.
Neuroticism The degree to which one is emotionally unstable.
Psychoticism The degree to which one is hostile, nonconforming, impulsive, and aggressive.
Five factor theory Costa and McCrae's trait theory that proposes five core dimensions to personality: openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism.
PEN According to Eysenck, there are only three basic traits: psychoticism, extraversion, and neuroticism.
Person-situation interaction The influence of the situation on the stability of traits; when in the same situation, we display similar behavior, but when the situation is different, behavior may change.
Social cognitive approach A personality perspective that emphasizes the influence of one's thoughts and social experiences in formulating personality.
Reciprocal determinism According to Bandura, the constant interaction among one's behavior, thoughts, and environment determines personality.
Self-efficacy The expectation that one has for success in a given situation.
Locus of control The expectation of control we have over the outcome of an event; an internal locus expects some degree of personal control, whereas an external locus expects little personal control.
Humanistic approach A personality perspective that emphasizes the individual, personal choice, and free will in shaping personality; assumes that humans have a built-in drive toward fulfilling their own natural potential.
Self-actualization The fulfillment of one's natural potential.
Actualizing tendency According to Rogers, the natural drive in humans to strive for fulfillment and enhancement.
Self-concept One's perception or image of his or her abilities and uniqueness.
Unconditional positive regard Acceptance and love of another's thought and feelings without expecting anything in return.
Reliability The degree to which a test yields consist measurements of a trait.
Validity The degree to which a test measures the trait that it was designed to measure.
Personality inventory Objective paper-and-pencil self-report form that measures personality on several dimensions.
Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-2) A personality inventory that is designed to identify problem areas of functioning in a person's personality
Projective test A less structured and subjective personality test in which an individual is shown an ambiguous stimulus and is asked to describe what he or she sees.
Rorschach inkblot test A projective personality test consisting of 10 ambiguous inkblots in which a person is asked to describe what he or she sees; the person's responses are then coded for consistent themes and issues.
Thematic Apperception Test (TAT) A projective test consisting of a series of pictures in which the respondent is asked to tell a story about each scene; the responses are then coded for consistent themes and issues.
Clinical interview The initial meeting between a client and a clinician asks to identify the difficulty in functioning that the person is experiencing.
Created by: cpruett8